Science and Medicine

TOTAL ACCESS DESPITE DISABILITIES
Breakthrough Technology from Project Archimedes

By David Salisbury


SETTLED SECURELY IN his wheelchair before a bank of computers, J.B. Galan rattles off a sentence: “Please ask Mrs. Wright to write to me right away.”

As he speaks, the correctly spelled words appear instantaneously in thick black characters on a computer screen projected on the wall.

With a twitch of his head and a few terse commands, he next loads an Internet browser on one of the computers and brings up a home page.

Galan, injured in a diving accident six years ago, is paralyzed from the shoulders down. But thanks to Project Archimedes, he excels at using computers for complex tasks. Writing letters, designing Web pages, and using telephones and electronic mail are part of his everyday routine.

Project Archimedes, a research program at Stanford’s Center for the Study of Language and Information, aims to ensure that disabled individuals like Galan are not left behind in the computer revolution.

Named for the ancient Greek mathematician and inventor who said, “Give me a place to stand on, and I will move the earth,” the project was set up to devise a system that will permit disabled people to use ordinary computers and software without costly modifications.

Total Access (Plain text)

Previous | Next


MARCH/APRIL 1996

 In This Issue

DEPARTMENTS
 Editor’s Note
 President’s Letter

NEWS
 Campus News
 21st Century Lab
 Campus News

 Sci & Med
 Total Access
 Sci & Med News

FEATURES
 Forum
 About the Sixties

 Essay
 Continents Apart

 Creative Writing
 The Big X
 Stegner's Legacy
 Short Story

HOME
GUEST SERVICES
SEARCHING
ST COLLECTION
NEWS SERVICE
ALUMNI
EMAIL THE EDITOR
COMING UP