Video Title: 
Judging Talent
Video Length: 
53 Minutes
Video Format: 
DVD/VHS
Video Price: 
$95.00
Wednesday, May 20, 2009
7:30am - 9:00am, 9:30am - 12:30pm
Main Dining Room, Stanford Faculty Club, 439 Lagunita Dr, Stanford, CA.
  • What hiring tools are the best predictors of job performance?
  • How gut instincts and flawed memories bias evaluations.
  • Critical features of successful appraisal systems.

Our ability to accurately judge talent is hampered by unconscious and subjective distractions. Hiring decisions are affected by common biases such as favoring tall or attractive candidates or by superficial first impressions of likability. In fact, according to Professor Flynn standard hiring interviews are only slightly more reliable than handwriting analysis in predicting on-the-job performance!

Far superior are work sample tests and intelligence tests which provide us with objective diagnostic data needed to make fair assessments. Evaluating performance over time is also affected by simple biases. We may not be able to shake off our first impressions what psychologists refer to as anchoring and insufficient adjustment.

We may subtly communicate our expectations and thus encourage the behavior we expect. Or we may assess performance; but not the level of difficulty of the assignment. Successful appraisal practices according to Dr. Flynn require clear evaluation criteria manager training on how to conduct performance reviews and as much objective data as possible.

Frank Flynn is Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior; Co-director of the High-Potentials Executive Program; Director of the Center for Leadership Development and Research at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. A graduate of the University of Notre Dame he received his PhD in Organizational Behavior from the University of California Berkeley.

Speaker: 

Frank Flynn - Director of the Center for Leadership Development and Research and Co-director of the High Potentials Program at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business

Frank Flynn - Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior; Co-director of the High-Potentials Executive Program; Director of the Center for Leadership Development and Research at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business.

Professor Flynn's research investigates issues of employee cooperation diversity in work groups and leadership in organizations. His recent work considers how employees can develop healthy patterns of cooperation and whether the influence of gender stereotypes on workplace dynamics can be mitigated. His scholarly articles appear in more than a dozen publications that span the fields of management and social psychology. He currently sits on the editorial boards of Administrative Science Quarterly and Academy of Management Journal. A winner of multiple teaching awards Professor Flynn's courses focus on leadership issues particularly how young managers can learn to navigate complex political environments and build interpersonal influence. In addition to MBA courses Professor Flynn teaches in Executive Education's Stanford Executive Program Human Resources for Strategic Advantage Managing Teams for Innovation and Success Executive Program in Strategy and Organization Executive Program for Women Leaders and the Stanford-National University of Singapore Executive Program in International Management.

Professor Flynn has worked for the Department of Commerce in the International Trade Administration the Institute for Business and Economic Development and the Institute for Urban and Regional Development. He has provided executive education for various companies including Cisco Johnson & Johnson Standard & Poor's Ixis Financial and M&T Bank providing training that focuses on improving employee decision making and interpersonal leadership skills.

Professor Flynn received his PhD in Organizational Behavior from the University of California Berkeley. From 2000-06 he served as an Assistant and then as an Associate Professor at Columbia Business School recently joining the GSB in September 2006. Frank is also a graduate of the University of Notre Dame. He lives in San Francisco with his wife Christina and his three children.