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Master of Science in Energy Resources Engineering

The objective of the M.S. degree in Energy Resources Engineering is to prepare the student either for a professional career or for doctoral studies.

Students in the M.S. degree program must fulfill the following:

  1. Complete a 45-unit program of study. The degree has two options:
    1. a course work degree, requiring 45 units of course work
    2. a research degree, of which a minimum of 39 units must be course work, with the remainder consisting of no more than 6 research units.
  2. Course work units must be divided among two or more scientific and/or engineering disciplines and can include the core courses required for the Ph.D. degree.
  3. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.
  4. The program of study must be approved by the academic adviser and the department graduate program committee.
  5. Students taking the research-option degree are required to complete an M.S. thesis, approved by the student's thesis committee.

RECOMMENDED COURSES AND SEQUENCES

The following list is recommended for most students. With the prior consent of the student's adviser, courses listed under technical electives may be substituted based on interest or background.

CORE SEQUENCE

Subject and Catalog Number

Units

ENERGY 221. Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow

3

ENERGY 246. Reservoir Characterization and Flow Modeling

3

CME 200. Linear Algebra with Application to Engineering Computations

3

CME 204. Partial Differential Equations in Engineering

3

CS 106X. Programming Methodology and Abstractions

3

EE 293A. Fundamentals of Energy Processes

3-4

EE 293B. Fundamentals of Energy Processes

3-4

MS&E 248. Economics of Natural Resources

3-4

Total

24-27

SUBJECT SEQUENCE ALTERNATIVES

Geothermal:

ENERGY 223. Reservoir Simulation

3

ENERGY 269. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

3

CHEMENG 120B. Energy and Mass Transport

4

GES 217. Faults, Fractures, and Fluid Flow

3

ME 131. Heat Transfer

3

ME 370. Energy Systems I

3

Total

15

Oil and Gas:

ENERGY 104. Technology in the Greenhouse

3

ENERGY 222. Advanced Reservoir Engineering

3

ENERGY 223. Reservoir Engineering

3

ENERGY 240. Geostatistics for Spatial Phenomena

3

ENERGY 251. Thermodynamics of Equilibria

3

Total

15

Natural Resource Characterization

ENERGY 240. Geostatistics

3

ENERGY 241. Practice of Geostatistics

3

ENERGY 244. Modeling of 3D Geological Objects

3

GEOPHYS 262. Rock Physics

3

GES 144. Geographic Information Systems

3

Total

15

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

ENERGY 23. Reservoir Simulation

ENERGY 102. Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes

ENERGY 104. Technology in the Greenhouse

ENERGY 120. Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering

ENERGY 260. Groundwater Pollution and Oil Spills

ENERGY 284. Optimization

ENERGY 301. The Energy Seminar

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

EARTHSYS 145/245. Energy Flow and Policy: The Pacific Rim

EARTHSYS 147/247. Controlling Climate Change in the 21st Century

ECON 250A. Natural Resource and Energy Economics

ECON 250B. Environmental Economics

GES 138. Urbanization, Global Change, and Sustainability

GES 230. Physical Hydrogeology

GES 231. Contaminant Hydrogeology

MATSCI 316. Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology

ME 131A. Heat Transfer

ME 150. Internal Combustion Engines

ME 260. Fuel Cell Science Technology

ME 370B. Energy Systems II: Modeling and Advanced Concepts

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