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General History Track

In addition to completing the requirements for all History majors, the student in the General History track is required to satisfy breadth and concentration requirements.

  1. Breadth Requirements: to ensure chronological and geographical breadth, at least two courses must be completed in a premodern chronological period and in each of three geographical fields: Field I (Africa, Asia, and Middle East); Field II (the Americas); and Field III (Europe, including Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and Russia). Courses fulfilling the premodern chronological period (Field IV) may also count for Fields I-III. For 2010-2011, these courses are as follows:
    1. Field I: Africa/Asia/Middle East
      • HISTORY 43S. Indian Ocean History, 1100-1945
      • HISTORY 45S. Colonial Anthropologists and the Production of Knowledge about Africa
      • HISTORY 48Q. South Africa: Contested Transitions
      • HISTORY 82N. Modern Islamic Movements
      • HISTORY 92S. Cultural Identity in Ancient and Medieval China
      • HISTORY 135. History of European Law, Medieval to Contemporary
      • HISTORY 145B. Africa in the 20th-Century
      • HISTORY 147. History of South Africa
      • HISTORY 181B. Formation of the Contemporary Middle East
      • HISTORY 182C. From Prophet to Empire: The Making of the Muslim Middle East, 600-1500
      • HISTORY 183. Modern Iran
      • HISTORY 187D. Zionism and Its Critics
      • HISTORY 191C. Early Imperial China
      • HISTORY 193. Late Imperial China
      • HISTORY 194B. Japan in the Age of the Samurai
      • HISTORY 195. Modern Korean History
      • HISTORY 195C. Modern Japanese History
      • HISTORY 196. The Idea of India
      • HISTORY 197. Southeast Asia from Antiquity to the Modern Era
      • HISTORY 198. The History of Modern China
      • HISTORY 224B. Modern Afghanistan
      • HISTORY 248S. African Societies and Colonial States
      • HISTORY 282. The United States and the Middle East since 1945
      • HISTORY 284. The Ottoman Turks in Comparative Perspective: The Inner Life of a Eurasian Empire
      • HISTORY 287D. Tel Aviv: Site, Symbol, City
      • HISTORY 287G. Jews in Colonial North Africa
      • HISTORY 287S. Middle East History
      • HISTORY 288. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict
      • HISTORY 291D. Colonialism and Collaboration in East Asia
      • HISTORY 292. The Korean War: Origins, Outbreak, and Aftermath
      • HISTORY 292D. Japan in Asia, Asia in Japan
      • HISTORY 292F. Traditional Korea
      • HISTORY 293. Law and Society in Late Imperial China
    2. Field II: The Americas
      • HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography
      • HISTORY 51S. Popular Violence in 19th-Century American Culture and Society
      • HISTORY 53S. Rebellion and Revolution in American History: From the Stamp Act to the Civil War
      • HISTORY 58N. Thomas Jefferson and his World
      • HISTORY 58S. Perceptions of Failure in 19th-Century America: Indians, Degenerates, and Debtors
      • HISTORY 60S. International Social Movements in the U.S. from World War I to World War II
      • HISTORY 61S. California Politics since the 1960s
      • HISTORY 62N. The Atomic Bomb in Policy and History
      • HISTORY 62S. The Politics, Culture and Ecology of Food in American History
      • HISTORY 107. Introduction to Feminist Studies
      • HISTORY 130A. The Rise of Scientific Medicine
      • HISTORY 150A. Colonial and Revolutionary America
      • HISTORY 150B. 19th Century America
      • HISTORY 150C. The United States in the 20th-Century
      • HISTORY 158B. History of Education in the United States
      • HISTORY 158C. History of Higher Education in the U.S.
      • HISTORY 161. Women in Modern America
      • HISTORY 164C. From Freedom to Freedom Now! African American History, 1865-1965
      • HISTORY 166. Introduction to African American History: The Modern African American Freedom Struggle
      • HISTORY 166B. Immigration in 20th-Century America: Ethnicity, Race, Nation
      • HISTORY 170. Colonial Latin America
      • HISTORY 201. Introduction to Public History in the United States, 19th Century to the Present
      • HISTORY 243J. Climate Change in the West: A History of the Future
      • HISTORY 251C. The American Enlightenment
      • HISTORY 251G. Topics in Constitutional History
      • HISTORY 258. Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence
      • HISTORY 258D. School: What Is It Good For?
      • HISTORY 260. California's Majority Minority Cities
      • HISTORY 278A. Political Economy of Property Rights
    3. Field III: Europe, Eastern Europe, and Russia
      • HISTORY 11N. The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall
      • HISTORY 17S. Princesses, Politicians, and Patronesses: Identities of Early Modern Noble Women
      • HISTORY 20Q. Russia in the Early Modern Imagination
      • HISTORY 30S. Travel, Adventure, Blood, and Espionage: The British Cultural Imagination in Afghanistan, 1813-1907
      • HISTORY 31Q: British History Revealed by the Arts of the Twentieth Century
      • HISTORY 32S. Gender and European Imperial Crisis through Media: 1880-2000
      • HISTORY 35N. Industrial Revolution: The History, Ethics, and Consequences of Modern Economic Development
      • HISTORY 36N. Gay Autobiography
      • HISTORY 37S. Youth in Modern Europe, 1762-1968
      • HISTORY 102. The History of the International System
      • HISTORY 110B. Early Modern Europe
      • HISTORY 110C. Introduction to Modern Europe
      • HISTORY 110D. Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages, 1000-1500
      • HISTORY 125. 20th-Century Eastern Europe
      • HISTORY 131. Science, Technology and Art: The Worlds of Leonardo da Vinci
      • HISTORY 132A. Enlightenment and the Arts
      • HISTORY 133B. Revolutionary England: The Stuart Age
      • HISTORY 135. History of European Law
      • HISTORY 137. The Holocaust
      • HISTORY 138A. Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990
      • HISTORY 139. Modern Britain and the Empire
      • HISTORY 185B. Jews in the Modern World
      • HISTORY 186D. Jews, Citizenship, and Europe's Others
      • HISTORY 204E. Origins of Totalitarianism
      • HISTORY 224A. The Soviet Civilization
      • HISTORY 227. East European Women and War in the 20th Century
      • HISTORY 230D. Europe in the World: 1789 to the Present
      • HISTORY 230F. Self-Policing, Denunciation, and Surveillance in Modern Europe
      • HISTORY 231A. Charles Darwin and the Global 19th Century
      • HISTORY 231G. European Reformations
      • HISTORY 233. Reformation, Political Culture, and the Origins of the English Civil War
      • HISTORY 233C. Two British Revolutions
      • HISTORY 233F. Political Thought in Early Modern Britain
      • HISTORY 234. Enlightenment Seminar
      • HISTORY 234F. Science, Technology, and Empire
      • HISTORY 236A. Nations and Nationalism in East-Central Europe
      • HISTORY 236D. Cold War Europe
      • HISTORY 238K. Resistance and Collaboration in Hitler's Europe During World War II
      • HISTORY 239. Capital and Empire
      • HISTORY 242A. Technology and Society in the Modern World (1700 to Present)
      • HISTORY 286E. Jews in France from the Dreyfus Affair to World War II
      • HISTORY 287E. Understanding the Age of Extremes: Intellectual Responses to the Holocaust and Totalitarianism
      • HISTORY 287K. Gentlemen and Jews: History of the Jews of England
    4. Field IV: Pre-1700
      • HISTORY 11N. The Roman Empire: Its Grandeur and Fall
      • HISTORY 17S. Princesses, Politicians, and Patronesses: Identities of Early Modern Noble Women
      • HISTORY 20Q. Russia in the Early Modern European Imagination
      • HISTORY 92S. Cultural Identity in Ancient and Medieval China
      • HISTORY 110B. Early Modern Europe
      • HISTORY 110D. Europe in the High and Late Middle Ages, 1000-1500
      • HISTORY 131. Science, Technology and Art: The Worlds of Leonardo da Vinci
      • HISTORY 132A. Enlightenment and the Arts
      • HISTORY 133B. Revolutionary England: The Stuart Age
      • HISTORY 135. History of European Law
      • HISTORY 170. Colonial Latin America
      • HISTORY 182C. From Prophet to Empire: The Making of the Modern Middle East, 600-1500
      • HISTORY 191C. Early Imperial China
      • HISTORY 193. Late Imperial China
      • HISTORY 194B. Japan in the Age of the Samurai
      • HISTORY 202C. Heretics to Headscarves
      • HISTORY 207C. The Global Early Modern
      • HISTORY 231G. European Reformations
      • HISTORY 233. Reformation, Political Culture, and the Origins of the English Civil War
      • HISTORY 233C. Two British Revolutions
      • HISTORY 233D. Strangers, Barbarians, and Infidels: Crosscultural Encounters in the Pre-Modern World
      • HISTORY 233F. Political Thought in Early Modern Britain
      • HISTORY 284. The Ottoman Turks in Comparative Perspective: The Inner Life of a Eurasian Empire
      • HISTORY 292F. Traditional Korea
      • IHUM 11A. Origins of the World: Europe and Latin America
  2. Concentration: to develop some measure of expertise, students must complete four courses in a single area (including one undergraduate colloquium or research seminar). The proposed concentration must be approved by the major adviser; a proposal for a thematic concentration must be approved by both the adviser and the department's director of undergraduate studies. Areas of concentration are:
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Eastern Europe and Russia
    • Europe before 1700
    • Europe since 1700
    • Jewish History
    • Latin America
    • Science and Technology
    • The United States
    • The Middle East
    • International History
    • Comparative Empires and Cultures
    • or a thematic subject treated comparatively, such as war and revolution, work, gender, family history, popular culture, or high culture.
  3. Required course: HISTORY 102. The History of the International System is a required course for students who select the International History concentration. This course is offered in Spring quarter.

Certain Introduction to the Humanities (IHUM) courses taught by History faculty in a Winter-Spring sequence count toward the General History major. These are: IHUM 4A,B; 5A,B; 6A,B;11A,B

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