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Atmosphere/Energy (A/E)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Atmosphere/Energy leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Atmosphere/Energy" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Atmosphere/Energy

Atmosphere and energy are strongly linked: fossil-fuel energy use contributes to air pollution, climate change, and weather modification; and changes in the atmosphere feed back to renewable energy, including wind, solar, hydroelectric, and wave energy. The mission of the undergraduate program in Atmosphere/Energy (A&E) is to provide students with the fundamental background necessary to solve large- and local-scale climate, air pollution, and energy problems through renewable and efficient energy systems. To accomplish this goal, students learn in detail the causes and proposed solutions to the problems, and learn to evaluate whether the proposed solutions are truly beneficial. A/E students take courses in renewable energy resources, indoor and outdoor air pollution, energy efficient buildings, climate change, renewable energy and clean-vehicle technologies, weather and storm systems, energy technologies in developing countries, electric grids, and air quality management. The curriculum is flexible: depending upon their area of interest, students may take in-depth courses in energy or atmosphere and focus either on science, technology, or policy. The major is designed to provide students with excellent preparation for careers in industry, government, and research, as well as study in graduate school.

Requirements

Mathematics (23 units minimum, including at least one course from each group):

Group A:

 

MATH 53. Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra

5

CME 102. Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers

5

Group B:

 

CME 106. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers

4

STATS 60. Introduction to Statistical Methods: Pre-Calculus

5

STATS 110. Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences

4-5

GES 160. Statistical Methods for Earth and Environmental Sciences

3-4

Science (22 units minimum, including all of the following):

PHYSICS 41. Mechanics

4

PHYSICS 43. Electricity and Magnetism
or 45. Light and Heat

4

CHEM 31B. Chemical Principles II
or CHEM 31X. Chemical Principles or ENGR 31

4

CEE 70. Environmental Science and Technology

3

Technology in Society:

STS 110. Ethics and Public Policy (WIM)

3-5

Engineering Fundamentals (three courses minimum, including the following):

ENGR 25E. Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use

3

Plus one of the following courses plus one elective

(see Basic Requirement 3):

ENGR 30. Engineering Thermodynamics

3

ENGR 60. Engineering Economy

3

ENGR 70A. Programming Methodology

3-5

Engineering Depth (42 units minimum):

Required:

CEE 64. Air Pollution: From Urban Smog to Global Change

3

CEE 173A. Energy Resources

4-5

At least 34 units from the following with at least four courses

from each group:

Group A: Atmosphere

 

AA 100. Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics

3

CEE 63. Weather and Storms

3

CEE 101B. Mechanics of Fluids or

ME 70. Introductory Fluids Engineering

4

CEE 164. Introduction to Physical Oceanography or EESS 146B. Atmosphere, Ocean, Climate Dynamics

4

3

CEE 172. Air Quality Management

3

CEE 172A. Indoor Air Quality (given alternate years)

2-3

CEE 172S. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

3-4

CEE 178. Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis

3

EARTHSYS 111. Biology and Global Change

EARTHSYS 133. California Climate Change Law and Policy

EARTHSYS 144. Fundamentals of GIS

or GEOPHYS 140. Introduction to Remote Sensing

EARTHSYS 147. Control Climate Change/21st Century (alt years)

3

3

4

3

3

3

EARTHSYS 148. Cooperage Climate Protocol

or EESS 57Q. Climate Change from Past to the Future

3

2

EESS 146A Atm., Ocean, Clim. Dynamics: Atm. Circ. (alt years)

3

ME 131B. Fluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery

4

Group B: Energy

 

CEE 109. Creating a Green Student Workforce

or EARTHSYS 45N. Environmental Issues Confronting the World (alternate years)

2

3

CEE 115. Goals & Methods for the Sustainable Design of Buildings

or CEE 177S. Design for a Sustainable World

3-4

 

1-5

CEE 142A. Negotiating Sustainable Development

or CEE 156. Building Systems

3

4

CEE 172P. Distributed Generation and Grid Integration Renewables

 

3-4

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings

3-4

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

3-4

CEE 176F. Energy Systems Field Trips (alternate years)

4

CEE 177S. Design for a Sustainable World

1-5

CHEMENG 35N. Renewable Energy for a Sustainable World

3

EARTHSYS 101. Energy and the Environment

3

EARTHSYS 102. Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes

3

EARTHSYS 132. Energy and Climate Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere

4

EE 25Q. Electric Automobiles and Aircraft

3

EESS 37N. Energy and Environment on the Back of an Envelope

3

ENERGY 104. Technology in the Greenhouse or MATSCI 11SC. Energy Technologies for a Sustainable Future

3

2

MATSCI 156. Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries

4

These requirements are subject to change. The final requirements are published with sample programs in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

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