The Bing Stanford in Washington Program requires students to enroll in classes offered at the Bass Center. These classes are meant to enrich your time and experience in Washington. BSIW classes:

  • Are taught by Washington policymakers and professionals and Stanford faculty

  • Range from 2 to 5 units

  • Consist mostly of seminars, but often a speaker series is offered as well

  • Are focused on health, environment, and art in the winter quarter

  • Are more varied and broader in focus during the fall and spring quarters

  • Are NOT cross-listed in any other department

All students participating in BSIW are required to enroll in at least 12 units on Axess. Classes are listed on Axess approximately 2 to 3 weeks before the beginning of the quarter. Students are allowed to shop for classes; however, all Axess deadlines must be followed.

Directed Reading

A directed reading is a focused, independent study completed under the supervision of a Stanford faculty member willing to advise you on your work. Directed readings can be anywhere from 2 units (about ten pages in length) to 5 units (about 25 pages in length). If you’d like your directed reading to be counted towards your major, you should arrange for your departmental advisor or another faculty member in your department to advise you on and read your paper. You will enroll in their directed reading on Axess and once the paper is complete, that faculty member will assign you a grade. If at all possible, arrangements should be made with a directed reading advisor before you arrive at BSIW.

Classes

    Fall and Spring Quarter Classes
  • U.S. Foreign Policy
    Randy Schriver, Founding Partner, Armitage International; Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian & Pacific Affairs ’01-‘05

  • Education Policy
    Gillian Cohen-Boyer and Joe Conaty

  • Congressional Oversight and the Press
    Walter Pincus, Pulitzer prize-winning national security journalist for The Washington Post

  • The American Presidency: From TR to Nixon
    Bob Dallek, American historian focusing on American Presidents and former Professor of History at Boston University and has previously taught at Columbia University, UCLA, and Oxford

  • Economic Growth and Development Patterns, Policies, and Prospects
    Steve Radelet, Chief Economist for the US Agency for International Development (USAID)

  • Civil Rights Law
    Alberto Ruisanchez, Deputy Chief of Disability Rights at the US Department of Justice

    Winter Quarter Classes
  • Health and Environmental Regulatory Policy
    Fumie Griego, Senior Economist, Office of Management and Budget

  • Health Policymaking in the U.S
    Dr. Patience White, Chief Health Officer at Arthritis Foundation

  • How a “Green” Idea Becomes a Law in a Post-Environment World: The Current State of U.S. Environmental Law and Policy
    Karen Hyun, Senior Policy Advisor, Department of Commerce