Lectures/Symposia

All lectures and symposia are held in the Cantor Arts Center auditorium and are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.

 

Also see the Art Focus Lecture Series, which offers visitors an opportunity to expand their knowledge of art through lectures, seminars, and workshops with faculty, curators, art experts, and artists.


Faculty Lecture: Alexander Nemerov, "Two Americas, One Place: Grandma Moses and Shirley Jackson"
Thursday, April 21, 5:30 pm, auditorium
Anna Mary Robertson Moses (a.k.a. Grandma Moses) and Shirley Jackson do not seem to go together. The maker of quaint childlike American scenes and the writer of the infamous short story "The Lottery" give vastly different views of America. Yet Moses and Jackson created their versions of American life within a few miles of one another, in and around the town of Bennington, Vermont, and they reached their greatest fame at the same time (around the year 1950). Alexander Nemerov, himself a native of Bennington, explores the relation between these two American masters. Professor Nemerov is the Chair of the Department of Art & Art History and the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities. Tickets are free, but advanced registration is required. Please see our EventBrite link for more detailed information. Space is limited.

Lecture: Blood in the Sugar Bowl
Wednesday, May 4, 5:30 pm, auditorium
Mellon Curatorial Research Assistant and Art History PhD candidate Rachel Newman discusses her exhibition, which explores sugar manufacturing and consumption at the peak of the sugar trade in the late 18th- and early 19th- centuries. Newman considers works of art depicting everything from sugar’s roots in brutal slave plantations to its final destination, the tables of tea drinkers in Britain. Supported by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Enter through the main lobby or Diekman (Rodin) Rotunda. Doors open at 5:15 pm.

Faculty Lecture: Gail Wight
Thursday, May 5, 5:30 pm, auditorium
Gail Wight, Associate Professor of Art Practice in Stanford's Department of Art & Art History, discusses the role of process in her work. This is part of a series of studio art faculty talks at the Cantor to welcome the Department of Art & Art History to their new home, the McMurtry Building.

Lecture: Myth, Allegory, and Faith: The Kirk Edward Long Collection of Mannerist Prints
Monday, May 9, 5:30 pm auditorium
In “The Rupture: Mannerist Printmaking,” curator Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator of Prints, Drawings and Photographs, discusses the rise of the Mannerist style in Europe during the early 16th century, which signaled an aesthetic and intellectual break with Renaissance ideals. This talk will closely examine prints and other works by some of the most influential artists represented in Myth, Allegory, and Faith: The Kirk Edward Long Collection of Mannerist Prints in order to explore the broader artistic, social, and political contexts that shaped this international style. Enter through the main lobby or Diekman (Rodin) Rotunda. Doors open at 5:15 pm.

 

Ethics of Democracy: A Conversation with Barbara Kruger
Monday, May 16, 5:30 pm, CEMEX Auditorium, Graduate School of Business, map
Kruger, a renowned American conceptual artist whose work explores consumerism, identity, and sexuality, converses with Alexander Nemerov, Chair of the Department of Art & Art History and the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities.
The event is part of "The Ethics of Democracy" series. Co-sponsored by the McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society


Angles on Art Gallery Talk
Duane Hansen’s “Slab Man (1974-75)”

Wednesday, June 1, Freidenrich Family Gallery, Cantor 2nd floor, 5:30 pm
Stanford graduate students Joseph Larnerd (Art History) and Max Suechting (Modern Thought and Literature) discuss the Cantor’s sculpture.

Faculty Lecture: Alexander Nemerov, Soulmaker: The Times of Lewis Hine
Thursday, June 2, 5:30 pm, auditorium
One hundred years ago the American photographer Lewis Hine took some of the most memorable pictures of child workers ever made. Traveling around the United States while working for the National Child Labor Committee, he photographed children in textile mills, coal mines, and factories from Vermont to Georgia. In this lecture, given in tandem with the Cantor's exhibition Soulmaker: The Times of Lewis Hine, Alexander Nemerov tells the story of some of Hine's most poignant photographs. Professor Nemerov is the Chair of the Department of Art & Art History and the Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities.



Learn more about the rich history of art.

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