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The PRN Certificate in

Product Creation and Innovative Manufacturing

Updated 02/06/2008
The Product Realization Network at Stanford (formerly AIM) is a continuous learning community of industrial professionals, academics, and students, passionate about the making of real things that improve people’s lives.

On-Campus Students

Distance Education-Non Degree Option (NDO) Students

Through the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD), PRN offers a certificate in Product Creation and Innovative Manufacturing designed to provide Stanford graduate students and industry professionals with a combination of engineering and business expertise needed to launch, manufacture, and distribute new products. It ensures students will have an understanding of three essential areas:

  • Methods and Processes - what makes a manufacturing process "tick" and how to develop new products with manufacturing technology in mind,
  • Management and Strategy - how to plan and execute a successful product launch and manage production systems,

  • Economic Modeling and Finance - how to estimate costs and manage finances associated with product creation and execution.

Awarding of the certificate requires the completion of four courses, one in each of the three component areas, plus a fourth course from any of these areas. (A letter grade average of 3.0 or better is required.) In addition, certificate recipients are strongly encouraged to enroll in one of the listed seminars depending on the product development community that they are interested in joining.

***Please note that the schedule noted is unofficial. Students should refer to the course guide or the listings on the SCPD site for official schedules*****

** Indicates limited classroom space. Please see below

Methods and Processes (choose one or two)

Course Title
Dept./ Number/Faculty

Units
Qtr
Project
Location

Manufacturing and Design
ME 203, Beach

3-4
A, W
No O-C
** Design Project Experience with Corporate Partners
ME 310 b,c, Cutkosky
3-5
W,S
Yes
O-C
Design for Manufacturability (counts as two courses)
ME 317a,b, Ishii
8
W,S
Yes
O-C, OL

Good Products, Bad Products
ME 314, Beach

3-4
W
Yes
O-C, OL
Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes
EE 212, Plummer
3-4 A No O-C, OL
Biochemical Engineeering
CHEMENG 250, Swartz
3-4 A No O-C
Advanced Biochemical Engineering
CHEMENG 355, Swartz
3-4 S No O-C, OL
†Entrepreneurial Design for Extreme Affordability
ME206/OIT333, Patell, Kelley, Beach
3-4 W, S Yes OC

Management and Strategy (choose one or two)

**Strategy and Management in Supply Chains
OIT 357, Holloway
4
S
Yes
O-C
Manufacturing Systems Design
MS&E 264 , Erhun
4
A
Yes
O-C, OL
Management of New Product Development
MS&E 266, Carlson
4
W
Yes
O-C, OL
**Business Process Design
OIT 363, Patell
4
S
Yes
O-C
Operations Strategy
MS&E 268, Carlson (not offered Spring '08)
3
S
No
O-C, OL

**Supply Chain Management
MS&E 262, Hausman

=OR=

**Supply Chain Management & Technology
OIT 362, Whang

3

 

 

4

S

 

 

S

Yes

 

 

Yes

O-C, OL

 

 

O-C

 

Economic Modeling and Finance (choose one or two)

Industrial Accounting
MS&E 240, Staff
4
W, Sum
No
O-C, OL (Summer only)
**Operations
OIT 262 Harrison, Plambeck, Wein
4
W
No
O-C
**Analysis of Production and Operating Systems
MS&E 260, Ozer
4
A
No
O-C, OL
Interactive Management Science
MS&E 207, Savage
3
A
Yes
O-C, OL
**Inventory Control and Production Systems
MS&E 261, Hausman
3
W
No
O-C, OL
**Finance I for Non-MBA's
MS&E 245G or F221, Admati
4
W
No
O-C
**Management Accounting
Acct 212, Rajan
4
S
No
O-C

Seminar (strongly recommended)

Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders
MS&E 472, Kosnik
1
A, W, Spr
No
O-C, OL
Human-Computer Interaction
CS 547, Winograd
1
A, W, Spr
No
O-C, OL
Materials Science Colloquium
MatSci 230, Staff
1
A, W, Spr
No
O-C
Leaders in Design Innovation
ME 397, Leifer
1
A, W, Spr, Sum
No
O-C, OL
Bioengineering and Biodesign Forum
ME 389, Staff
1
A, W, Spr
No
O-C, OL
Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences
CHE 459, Robertson
1
A, W, Spr
No
O-C, OL
Design & Manufacturing Systems Engineering Forum
ME396, Reis
1
W, Spr
No
O-C, OL

Legend

ME = Mechanical Engineering Sum = Summer Quarter
MS&E = Management Science and Eng OL= online via SCPD
OIT/ A/ F = Graduate School of Business TV= microwave broadcast via SCPD (within 50 Miles)
A = Autumn Quarter V= videotape via SCPD
W = Winter Quarter O-C= On Campus only
S = Spring Quarter TBD=to be determined

** Indicates limited classroom space. Please see below

† Enrollment by application only. See course website for details

On-Campus Students

On-campus students should register their intent to pursue the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing at Stanford Certificate in Product Creation and Innovative Manufacturing and enroll in the courses through AXESS.

 

Distance Education and NDO Students

For course descriptions and to enroll, go to:

http://scpd.stanford.edu/scpd/programs/certs/aim.htm

Off-campus students wishing to pursue the Alliance for Innovative Manufacturing at Stanford Certificate in Product Creation and Innovative Manufacturing should register their intent to pursue the certificate with PRN and enroll in courses broadcast by the Stanford Center for Professional Development through the Non-Degree Option (NDO) program. Note: Enrollment through the SCPD NDO should take place even for certificate courses that are only available on the Stanford campus. Honors Cooperative Program master's students (HCP) should register through AXESS and through SCPD.

Non-Degree Option

The NDO program permits professional employees of member companies to register for Stanford courses and earn grades and credit without matriculating as regular Stanford graduate students. The NDO category is available solely to employees of SCPD member companies. NDO students receive all course materials, do homework, and take examinations. They receive grades and units for completed coursework. Stanford transcripts are available on request.

On-Line and On-Campus Courses

It is PRN's intention that at least one path to the Certificate in Product Creation and Innovative Manufacturing will be available entirely on-line through the Stanford Center for Professional Development. For certificate students from the local area who wish to take courses that are not currently on-line, PRN will do its best to arrange with the instructor to allow these students to attend the courses at Stanford on a space available basis. However, any course that is also offered on-line must be taken on-line by NDO students.

On-campus courses have limited classroom space and may be taken  by NDO students strictly on a space available basis and with the consent of the professor. Priority is given to full-time majors within the department.

Note: An NDO student desiring to take a course with an OIT or Acct designation must contact the Assistant Director, PRN aim-info@stanford.edu, ph: (650) 723-9038) a minimum of four (4) weeks prior to the first day of classes for that quarter.

Back

Obtaining the Certificate

Certificates are awarded to students upon completion of 12-18 units of coursework with a letter grade indicator (LGI) average of 3.0 or better.     

When an NDO student has completed the PRN requirements in a certificate course sequence, she or he should submit a Certificate Request form to SCPD. The form should only be requested and filled in once a certificate sequence has been completed. This form is also available in hardcopy by calling (650) 725-3016. Once the completed Certificate Request form is received, the SCPD Student Services Coordinator will forward it to PRN for approval and processing of the certificate.

When an on-campus student has completed the requirements, he or she should apply for award of the certificate and submit a transcript to PRN.

 

 

 

Course Descriptions

 

Methods and Processes

ME 203 Manufacturing and Design

Emphasis is on prototype development techniques as an intrinsic part of the design process. Machining, welding, and casting. Manufacturing processes. Design aspects developed in an individual term project chosen, designed, and fabricated by students. Labs, field trips. Undergraduates majoring in Mechanical Engineering or Product Design must take course for 4 units. Limited enrollment with consent of instructor. Corequisite: 103D or CAD experience. Corequisite for WIM for Mechanical Engineering and Product Design majors: ENGR 102M. Recommended: 101. WIM

3-4 units, Aut, Win (Beach)

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ME 310 b,c (also listed as Engr 310 b,c) Tools for Team-Based Design

Two quarter project for graduate students with design experience who want involvement in an entrepreneurial design team with real world industrial partners. Products developed are part of the student's porfolio. Each team functions as a small startup company with a technical advisory board of the instructional staff and a coach. Computer-aided tools for project management, communication, and documentation; budget provided for direct expenses including technical assistants and conducting tests. Corporate liaisons via site visits, video conferencing, email, fax and phone. Hardware demonstrations, peer reviews, scheduled documentation releases, and a team environment provide the mechanisms and culture for design information sharing. Enrollment by consent of instructor; depends on a pre-enrollment survey in December and recommendations by project definition teams in ME 310A. For some projects, 217 and 218 may be prerequisites or corequisites. See course website for further admission guidelines.
http://me310.stanford.edu
Cutkosky, Leifer.

310B 3-5 units, Win, 310C 3-5 units Spr, O-C, PL

ME 314: Good Products, Bad Products

The characteristics of industrial products that cause them to be successes or failures: the straightforward (performance, economy, reliability), the complicated (human and cultural fit, compatibility with the environment, craftsmanship, positive emotional response of the user), the esoteric (elegance, sophistication, symbolism). Engineers and business people must better understand these factors to produce more successful products. Projects, papers, guest speakers, field trips. Limited enrollment.

Beach, 3 units, Win, OL/TV

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ME 317A: Design for Manufacturability: Product Definition

ME317 at Stanford addresses systematic methodologies to define, develop, and produce world-class products. Student teams work on projets to identify opportunities for improvement and develop a comprehensive product definition. Topics: value engineering, quality function deployment, design for assembly and producibility, design for variety and supply chain, design for life-cycle quality, and concurrent engineering. Students must take ME217B to complete the project and obtain a letter grade. On-campus class limited to 28. SCPD class does not have a limit, but each site must have at least 3 students to form a project team and define a project.

Required: Course Reader: Available at the Stanford University Bookstore  
http://me317.stanford.edu/

Ishii, 4 units, Win, OL/TV

ME317B: Design for Manufacturability: Quality by Design for Customer Value

Building on ME 317A, focus is on the implementation of competitive product deisgn. Student groups apply structured methods to optimize the design of an improved product, and plan for its manufacture, testing, and service. The project deliverable is a comprehensive product and process specification. Topics; concept generation and selection (Pugh's Method), FMEA applied to the manufacturing process, design for robustness, Taguchi Method, SPC and Six Sigma process, tolerance analysis, flexible manufacturing, product testing, rapid prototyping. Enrollment limited to 40, not including SCPD students. Minimum enrollment of two per SCPD viewing site; single student site by prior consent of instructor. On-campus class limited to 25. For SCPD students, no enrollment limit, but each site must have a minimum of three students to form a project team and define a project on their own.


http://me317.stanford.edu

Prerequisite: ME317A

Ishii, 4 units, Spr, OL, TV, V

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EE212 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes

For students interested in the physical bases and practical methods of silicon VLSI chip fabrication, or the impact of technology on device and circuit design, or intending to pursue doctoral research involving the use of Stanford's Nanofabrication laboratory. Process simulators are used to illustrate concepts and provide a virtual lab experience. Topics: the fundamental principles of integrated circuit fabrication processes, physical and chemical models for crystal growth, oxidation, ion implantation, etching, deposition, lithography, and back-end processing. Required for 410. Prerequisite: undergraduate semiconductor device physics. 3 units, Aut (Plummer)

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CHEMENG 250 Biochemical Engineering

Principles used in the biological production of fine biochemicals, with emphasis on protein pharmaceuticals as a fundamental paradigm. Basic and applied principles in applied biochemistry, enzyme kinetics, cellular physiology, recombinant DNA technology, metabolic engineering, fermentation development and scale up, product isolation and purification, protein folding and formulation, and biobusiness and regulatory issues. Prerequisite: BIOSCI 41 or equivalent.  Corequisite: 150A/250A

3 units, Aut (Swartz)

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CHEMENG 355 Advanced Biochemical Engineering

Quantitative biological concepts and the technological tools for exploiting the power offered by modern biology. How a cell interacts with and influences its environment, how a production organism is produced and optimized. Concepts for large-scale bioproduct production, isolation and purification. How proteins are manufactured without living cells, how biopharmaceutical is formulated and delivered, and the regulatory requirements for drug approval and sale. Prerequisite: 350 or BIOSCI 41 or equivalent. 

3 units, Spr (Swartz)

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MS&E 264: Manufacturing Systems Design

The concepts and techniques of designing and improving performance and productivity in systems composed of and influenced by people, organizational factors, environmental factors, and technology. Emphasis is on the design of high-performance manufacturing systems. Use of simulation as a tool for design evaluation.
http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande264/

Erhun, 4 units, S, OL, TV, V

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Management and Strategy

OIT 357.  Competitive Positioning in Supply Chains

Advancements in information technologies have enabled major innovations in the reengineering of industry supply chains. Such innovations have redefined the ways the companies operate their supply chains, and new ventures have also emerged to create value for business partners and the consumers in supply chain integration. This course focuses on how information technologies have advanced supply chain integration and coordination. The course will study business cases addressing various dimensions of business and process improvement, as well as new opportunities using supply chain management concepts and emerging technologies.

Holloway., 4 units, A,  O-C

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OIT363. Business Process Design 

Building on the foundation established in OIT 262, Operations, this course will focus on the business processes through which "real work" is accomplished, such as order fulfillment, product development, and customer service. The course will discuss fundamental ideas underlying total quality management, time-based competition, and business process reengineering. Specific topics include: capacity management, integrated work, the impact of variability on process performance, statistical process control, dynamic flow management, time compression, performance measurement systems, and inter-firm coordination.Assignments will include case analyses, computer simulations, and hands on simulation xcercises. Cases are drawn from a variety of industries including services, manufacturing, and health care.

Patell, 4 units, Spr, O-C

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MS&E 266 Management of New Product Development

Techniques of managing or leading the process of new product development that have been found effective. Emphasis is placed on how much control is desirable and how that control can be exercised in a setting where creativity has traditionally played a larger role than discipline. Topics: Design for manufacturability, assessing the market, imposing discipline on the new product development process, selecting the appropriate portfolio of new product development projects, disruptive technology, product development at internet speed, uncertainty in product development, role of experimentation in new product development, creating an effective development organization, and developing products to hit cost targets.
http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande266

Carlson, 4 units, W, OL/TV/V

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MS&E 268 Operations Strategy (formerly Manufacturing Strategy)

The development and implementation of the operations functional strategy. The integration of manufacturing strategy with business and corporate strategies of a manufacturing-based firm. Topics: types and characteristics of manufacturing technologies, quality management, capacity planning and facilities choice, the organization and control of operations, and operations’ role in corporate strategy.
http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande268/
Prerequisite, MS&E 260 or 261 or equivalent experience.

Carlson, 3 units, Spr, OL/TV/V

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MS&E 262 Supply Chain Management

Definition of  a supply chain, coordination difficulties, pitfalls and opportunities in supply chain management, inventory-service tradeoffs, performance measurement and incentives. Global supply chain management, mass customization, supplier management. Design and redesign of products and processes for supply chain management, tools for analysis, industrial applications, current industry initiatives.

http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande262

Enrollment limited.

Prequisite: MS&E 260 or 261

Hausman, 3 units, Spr, O-C

OIT 362. Supply Chain Management and Technology

Firms in many industries are scrambling to develop innovative ways to move products from raw materials through manufacturing to customers more quickly and efficiently. Some are responding by necessity to competition, both domestically and internationally. Others are capitalizing on the continuing stream of dramatic improvements in information technology. They redesign their supply chains to gather, process, transmit, share, and exploit vast amounts of information quickly and cheaply. Still others are applying the radically different philosophy of seeking a cooperative approach among all the players in the supply chain. Huge improvements have been enjoyed by firms able to optimize over their entire supply chains and figure out how to share the resulting gains while breaking down the traditional adversarial relationships. Some redesign their chains to bypass unneeded stages. Other innovations derive from deregulation and lower tariffs. This course examines many of the recent innovations in this area with an emphasis on technologies.

Whang

Economic Modeling and Finance

MS&E240: Industrial Accounting

Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career.

Stanton, 4 units, A, Sum., (OL Sum) TV, V

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MS&E207: Interactive Management Science

Analytical techniques such as linear and integer programming, Monte Carlo simulation, forecasting, decision analysis, and Markov chains in the environment of the spreadsheet. Materials include spreadsheet add-ins for implementing these and other techniques. Emphasis is on building intuition through interactive modeling, and extending the applicability of this type of analysis through integration with existing business data structures. Project required.

http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande207

Savage, 3 units, A TV/ V/ OL

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OIT 262. Operations 

This course focuses on basic managerial issues arising in the operations of both manufacturing and service industries. The objectives of the course are to familiarize students with the problems and issues confronting operations managers, and to introduce language, conceptual models, and analytical techniques that are broadly applicable in confronting such problems. The spectrum of different process types used to provide goods and services is developed and then examined through methods of process analysis and design.

Harrison, Plambeck, Wein, 4 units, W, O-C

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MS&E 260 Analysis of Production and Operating Systems

Businesses add value through production and delivery of products and services; operations managers are responsible for designing, running, and improving systems and processes to meet demand for goods and services. Discussion of techniques to analyze such operating systemss. Topics include determination of optimal facility location, production lot sizing, optimal timing and sizing of capacity expansion, and inventory control.

 Prerequisites: Probability and Optimization
http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande260/

Ozer, 4 units, A, OL

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ACCT 212. Management Accounting 

This course emphasizes the use of accounting information for internal planning and control purposes. The orientation contrasts with financial accounting where the focus is on accounting disclosures for parties external to the firm. The course is intended for individuals who will make business decisions and evaluate the performance of business units using data obtained from the accounting system.

Rajan,4 units, Spr, O-C

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MS&E 261 Inventory Control and Production Systems

Topics in the planning and control of manufacturing systems. The functions of inventory, determination of order quantities and safety stocks, alternative inventory replenishment systems, item forecasting, production-inventory systems, materials requirements planning and manufacturing resource planning (MRP), Just-in-Time systems, master and operations scheduling, supply chain management and service operations.

Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: MS&E 120, or Stats 116, or equivalent.

Hausman, 3 units, Win, OL

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MS&E 245G or F221. Introduction to Finance for non-MBA's

This course covers the foundations of finance with applications in corporate finance and investment management. It discusses many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers and investors. Essential in many of these decisions is the process valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, market efficiency, and the valuation of derivative securities (e.g., options). The course also provides coverage of the major financial instruments issued by corporations including debt, equity, and convertible securities. Note: This course is equivalent to the core finance course in the MBA program, Bus. F220. 
 
Limited Enrollment. Same as Finance 221 in the Graduate School of Business. 

Prerequisites: Econ. 51 or Eng. 60 or equivalent; ability to use spreadsheets, knowledge of basic probability and statistics concepts, including random variables, expected value, variance, covariance, and simple estimation and regression.

Admati, 4 units, W, O-C

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Seminar

CH/E459: Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences

Introduction to cutting-edge research involving interdisciplinary approaches to bioscience and biotechnology; for specialists and non-specialists. Associated with Stanford's BioX Programs and the Clark Center for Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, and held in conjunction with a seminar series meeting twice monthly during 2001-02. Leading investigators from Stanford and throughout the world speak on their research; registered students also meet separately [see Course Details] to discuss the ever-changing subject matter, related literature, and future directions.

Web Info

Robertson, 1 unit, A/W/Spr, OL/TV/V

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CS547: Human-Computer Interaction Seminar

Weekly speakers on topics related to human-computer interaction design. Presentations on a wide and evolving range of current research issues relating to human-computer interaction.  
http://hci.stanford.edu/cs547/

Winograd, 1 unit, A/W/Spr, OL/TV/V

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MS&E472: Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders' Seminar

Dialogue with leading entrepreneurs, corporate executives, venture capitalists, and technology leaders from Silicon Valley and around the world. A prominent entrepreneur or other industry thought leader provides cutting-edge ideas and pragmatic lessons, creating a gathering place for Stanford's extended entrepreneurial community. To expose members of the Stanford community to cutting-edge ideas and pragmatic advice from high tech leaders from the world outside Stanford. To create a forum where current Stanford students can meet Stanford alumni and members of Stanford IEEM Industry Affiliate companies. To provide students enrolled in distance learning through Stanford Instructional Television Network with the option to participate from their workplaces, or to occasionally visit campus and participate in person. To provide a spawning ground for new ventures by putting a diverse array of talented, entrepreneurial people in the same place at the same time. http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande472/

Kosnik, A/W/Spr, OL/TV/V

The course is open to anyone in the Stanford community interested in the topics of Technology Management, Global Entrepreneurial Marketing, and Entrepreneurial Leadership. It may be taken for course credit, or audited by students, alumni, and friends of Stanford.    

Hardware and Software Requirements: 

Students will need a Stanford Leland account to check out the course website and send in final assignment (an email of lessons learned at the end of the quarter).  

Grading: Students wishing to earn one unit of credit must watch or attend at least 8 of the class sessions. They must also submit a 2-3 page email at the end of the quarter based on lessons learned from the speakers, and how they intend to apply the lessons on the job. See the course website for details of the final email assignment.  

No letter grades will be given. The sessions are held on Friday afternoons in hopes that SITN students can occasionally take off work a little early and come to campus to meet the thought leaders, on campus students, and enjoy a lively exchange live and in person. Refreshments are served! Please watch live, and drop in from time to time!

30% attendance and participation; 70% Two page email at end of quarter.

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ME389: Bioengineering and Biodesign Forum

(Formerly ME 288)

Invited speakers discuss engineering, medical, legal, and business issues associated with the development of medical devices.  

Staff, 1 unit, A /W/Spr,  OL/TV/ V

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ME 396 Design and Manufacturing Forum

(Formerly ME 296)
Invited speakers address issues of interest to design and manufacturing engineers. Brief presentations and followed by open discussions. Sponsored by the Product Realization Network at Stanford (PRN).
http://www.stanford.edu/group/AIM/AIMPrograms/ME396/Index.html

Reis, 1 unit, W/Spr, O-C, OL

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ME 397 Design Theory and Methodology Forum

Research reports, literature reviews, and designer interviews promote rigorous examinations of the cognitive basis methodology for designer behavior and design tool development.

Leifer, 1 unit, A/W/Spr/Sum  OL/TV/ V

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MATSCI 230 Materials Science Colloquium

Staff, 1unit  A/W/Spr

 
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