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ASB 2016-2017 - Asian American Issues: From Identity to Action

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Asian American Issues: From Identity to Action
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

What does it mean to be “Asian American”? Do “Asian” and “Asian American” mean the same thing? Is the term “Asian American” a paradox?

 

These questions reveal that the term “Asian American,” while seemingly simple and all-encompassing, often casts Asian Americans as a homogeneous group—rendering invisible the complexities behind the Asian American identity. This includes a broad range of challenges affecting Asian Americans of all ages and backgrounds: from workers’ and immigrant rights to racism, healthcare, LGBTQ issues, education, and more. Asian Americans have been present in the United States for four centuries, but much of their stories are underrepresented. Thus, the Alternative Spring Break Program will bring Asian American issues to light and inspect them with critical lenses.

 

In this Alternative Spring Break trip, we will analyze how social, political, and economic factors affect the formation of identities and use this framework to critically process and confront the messages we see about Asian Americans. First, we will explore the Asian American identity, the history of Asians in America, and the Asian American Movement. Then, we will use this knowledge to study a broad range of contemporary campaigns such as workers’ and immigrant rights, LGBTQ intersectionality, environmental justice, and educational and socioeconomic disparities. We will also explore how Asian Americans have organized together across cultures to build solidarity and fight for justice. By exploring this spectrum, we will examine our own commonalities with these issues, regardless of our ethnic or cultural background. We will also explore these topics through different media of activism: art, community organizing, health services, and more.

Custom Question: 
How have your identities (gender, race, class, ethnicity) shaped your experience as a person and how have those experiences brought you towards applying for this class?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hi! I’m Jo (They/Them). I’m a 4th year student pursuing an honors in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity with a potential minor in modern languages. I was born in Hong Kong and grew up in a mix of Hong Kong, Seoul (Korea) and the Bay Area. Surprisingly, I am not yet an American citizen (though I will be soon!) I first came to the US for high school where I experienced a mix of issues regarding my gender, queerness and racial identity. During this time, I spent a lot of time trying to navigate my Queer (/Trans) Asian identity in a world where so few were visible to me. In college, I started to learn about the inter-related nature of so many topics I had previously known but had always seen to be separate: the racist depictions of Asian-Americans on TV, the immense effort my Korean friends would put into to look “whiter”, the almost all-white list of “celebrity crushes” in my frosh dorm, and a history of colonialism and imperialism all suddenly seemed so deeply related. I joined Stanford Asian American Activism Committee and started doing work with Queer and Asian where I was able to think and learn so much more about the various issues and histories that mattered to me, my loved ones and my communities. Going on this ASB last year, I was able to build a better foundation for Asian American Issues, learn about the various issues that affect a vibrant and diverse community ranging from environmental justice to worker’s rights, and meet people that matter so much to me now. I hope that this class will be as valuable to those who end up taking it, as it has been for me. Contact Information: jlee9100@stanford.edu
Biography:
Hi, my name’s Chester Thai(he/him) and I’m a Junior currently majoring in Computer Science. I was born and raised in Philadelphia, living both in the city and the suburbs. Although my parents are immigrants from China and Vietnam, I never thought much about my Asian American identity until I participated in this ASB trip last year. It was one of my best experiences at Stanford, and led me to become more involved in the API community, such as through joining Stanford Asian American Activist Committee(SAAAC). I developed really valuable friendships and became more aware about social issues affecting marginalized communities in the US. The ASB trip allowed me to reflect on my Asian American Identity and provided context for many of my experiences prior to Stanford. I’ve learned so much from this trip, and I’m really excited to share it with this year’s participants! Contact Information: cthai18@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Ating Kasaysayan - Our Story: Pilipinx Narratives of History, Solidarity, and Service

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Ating Kasaysayan - Our Story: Pilipinx Narratives of History, Solidarity, and Service
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
  • Trip Description: 
    After our course in the Winter quarter, we will go on a service-learning trip through California, visiting grassroots organizations and historical sites that have made significant contributions to the Pilipinx-American community. While our trip focuses on the struggles associated with one particular cultural group, those struggles, and the skills used to develop effective strategies that address them, are relevant to anyone interested in the general ideas of identity, solidarity, and sustainable service.
  • Course Description:

    On February 4, 1899, fighting broke out between American and Philippine military forces in Manila, effectively starting the Philippine-American War. Due to the brutality of US soldiers, this war was, and continues to be, largely overlooked in history, dubbing it as “The Forgotten War.” As it turns out, the Philippine-American War is only one of many cases where the Pilipinx narrative has been overlooked.

    In this course, we will examine Pilipinx stories of the events and issues that have shaped the Pilipinx and Pilipinx-American identity. We will first trace the history of the Philippines in order to understand the events and circumstances that led to the struggles that Pilipinos and Pilipino-Americans face today. The class will then delve into the concept of sustainable service through the lens of these struggles by exploring ideas of activism, community empowerment, and interracial solidarity.
Custom Question: 
Background: More than 6,000 Pilipinos leave the Philippines every day to seek work abroad as Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs), leaving behind their homes and families. The following video is a 2011 Coca Cola ad relating to OFWs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_9fQEqZCWs Consider the theme of service and its connection to migration in the Philippines. What is your opinion on how Coca Cola serves the Pilipinx community through their OFW Project?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Joriene Mercado: Hey! My name is Joriene (he/him) and I’m thrilled to be one of the leaders of the Pilipinx issues ASB. I’m a junior studying Human Biology from Pacifica, CA, so, naturally, I’m a huge Warriors and Giants fan. I aspire to pursue a synergistic career that fuses medicine, public health, and education to improve the wellbeing of youth in marginalized communities. A lot of my academic and career interests stem from my involvement in the Pilipino American Student Union (PASU) and ASB. In PASU, I was part of the Kababayan (which translates to ‘fellow countrymen’) committee, where I had the opportunity to delve deeper into social justice and empower students to take action on issues affecting the Pilipino community both here and abroad. ASB not only supplemented, but amplified my work in PASU, as the class contextualized the issues I had been fighting for and taught me how to engage in effective and ethical service. Learning about the inequities and injustices in my community has fueled me to learn more, build with my community, and ultimately mobilize others to fight for genuine change. ASB has undoubtedly been my favorite experience at Stanford because it has greatly influenced my trajectory and taught me so much about myself and my community. Sign up for an experience of a lifetime! Contact information: joriene@stanford.edu
Biography:
Jerold Yu: Suh dudes, I’m Jerold (he/him)! I’m a sophomore looking to major in Mathematics and Computational Science and minor in Asian American Studies and possibly Education. Growing up in downtown San Francisco, CA, I was immersed in a vibrant Pilipinx American community that experienced a myriad of issues, such as gentrification. At Stanford, I hope to foster that same sense of community within API groups on campus, and learn more about the social injustices that are prevalent in marginalized communities like mine. Much like many past participants have expressed, going on an ASB trip was one of the best experiences in my Stanford career. Learning more about my history and various organizing efforts around current issues in the Pilipinx American community has given me a better sense of self, and inspired me to be a more conscious and involved community member. Oh, and the class and the trip are LOTS OF F U N! Please consider signing up, I guarantee you’ll have an amazing time :) Contact information: jeroldyu@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Bridging the Civil-Military Divide

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Bridging the Civil-Military Divide
Trip Location: 
Washington D.C.
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
  • Trip Description:
    This Spring Break, students learn from and interact with the military-affiliated community, including enlisted servicemembers, officers, veterans, military family members, civilians serving in Congress and the Pentagon, and peers their age studying at the U.S. Naval Academy. The trip will build on the material covered in the Winter Quarter course to provide an opportunity for Stanford students of all backgrounds and affiliations to ask questions of military personnel, veterans, and families of veterans in an open environment, and to explore solutions on how to bridge the Civil-Military Divide and the issues facing veterans today. For the 2017 cohort, Kalvin Parker and Katy Brown will lead a trip to the Washington, DC area, planning to visit the White House, the Pentagon, Andrews Air Force Base, Marine Corps Base Quantico, the U.S. Coast Guard Station in Anacostia, Walter Reed Hospital and the Arlington National Cemetery. The trip will conclude with 3 days and 2 nights at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Along with these activities, the Spring Break trip will focus on opportunities for discussion and community-building, as well as group and individual reflection.
  • Course Description:
    How does society conceive of a soldier, a sailor, an airman, or a marine? This Alternative Spring Break class, “Bridging the Civil-Military Divide,” is a service-learning program that focuses on building connections between the military and civilian communities and raising awareness of the issues that impact them. The course will introduce students to various topics and questions surrounding the military, and provide opportunities to interact with the military-affiliated community here at Stanford and beyond, while gaining insight into the political, social, and ethical questions and values of today’s military.

    The student-led one-unit course, held in Winter Quarter, includes panels of active duty and former military personnel, political scientists, and military family members; weekly articles and occasional documentaries for discussion, and books for further reading and research on the course topics. Over spring break, the class will travel to Washington D.C. to apply what they learned in the class in order to better understand military branches, institutions, families, veterans’ affairs, and the divide between the military and civilian populations.

Custom Question: 
Why are you interested in this trip, and what do you think is the most important issue facing veterans and the larger military community today?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Katy bio: Hi, my name is Katy and I’m a sophomore studying computer science with a minor in Chinese. I’m from Boston and currently live in Branner. I was a participant on the "Bridging the Military-Civil Divide" trip last year and am excited to be co-leading the course and trip this year! In my free time, I like drinking tea, running, and (when I’m home) taking care of my tropical fish. I’m a member of the Navy ROTC unit at UC Berkeley and hope to join the Navy's Surface Warfare community after graduation. Contact me at kbrown6@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Kalvin bio: I’m Kalvin, a junior majoring in Product Design. I’m originally from Rochelle, IL and currently live in ZAP. I took Bridging the Civil-Military divide last year and can’t wait to lead the trip this year! I want to show people the positives and negatives surrounding today’s military and also encourage them to think critically about what the military is and does. Outside of ASB, I’m the Mellophone section leader in the LSJUMB and enjoy watching movies and binging Netflix originals. I am a cadet in the Air Force ROTC detachment at San Jose State University and plan to become a pilot in the US Air Force after graduation. You can get ahold of me at kalvinp@stanford.edu.

ASB 2016-2017 - Design Thinking for Social Innovation: Stanford & Japan Exchange

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Design Thinking for Social Innovation: Stanford & Japan Exchange
Trip Location: 
Bay Area
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
6
Trip Description: 

Design thinking has taken Stanford and the global innovation community by storm. Social innovators and educators in both the US and Japan are asking how design thinking can reach its potential to create positive impact. This spring break, we will use design thinking to examine an aspect of education in America and see how individual and group efforts can contribute to insights and improvements. This will take the form of interviews, observations, group discussions, and partnerships with local organization(s).

 

In collaboration with VIA’s Social Innovation Program, 20 college students interested in social change will be flying in from Japan to join us for a hands-on project experience addressing current challenges and opportunities in education. Stanford students will lead discussions on education and culture, as well as participate in organization visits in the Bay Area, offering the unique opportunity to hear from different perspectives, exchange ideas, and learn from each other across cultures.


If you are interested in creating inclusive spaces for people of all cultures to discuss design thinking, social innovation, and education, join today! We are excited to go on this journey with you.

Custom Question: 
Why are you interested in collaborating on an education-related project with students from Japan? Why are you interested in design thinking?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hi! I’m Jessica, a junior studying English and Japanese, and I’m really looking forward to exploring design thinking and intercultural relations with you this year! I decided to co-lead this trip for many reasons, but really I just love VIA after doing two programs with them this past summer, one of which was the Impact Abroad Japan trip. During Impact Abroad, I really felt that design-thinking wasn’t just something we learned about in class; design-thinking was something that allowed us to produce both meaningful and useful projects for Rikuzentakata. I believe that we can have the same impact here in the Bay Area as well! Catch me in the squat rack or on Xbox Live! Contact Information: jmeno@stanford.edu
Biography:
Hey there! I’m Cali, a junior majoring in Biomechanical Engineering and minoring in Japanese (but planning to pursue a graduate degree in Education). I worked with Volunteers in Asia (VIA) this past summer on their Medical Exchange and Discovery (MED) Program and had a phenomenal time -- which is why I’m super excited to co-lead an ASB done in collaboration with VIA. I’m also super excited because I’ll get to explore the intersections of design thinking, social innovation, cross-cultural communication, and education with you! When I’m not spending countless hours doing my psets or trying to memorize kanji, I am having fun with the Stanford Vietnamese Student Association (SVSA), Mua Lac Hong (Vietnamese Dance), and the Stanford Society of Women Engineers (SWE). Academics and extracurriculars aside, I love drinking boba, finding Pusheen related things, and taking random Buzzfeed Quizzes. Contact Information: cali14@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Environmental Policy in California

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Environmental Policy in California
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
  • Course Description:
    With climate change posed to be one of the most pressing issues of the 21st Century, environmental preservation is emerging at a top priority. In addition to the federal government, state and local governments regulate the environment. In this course, we will learn about what environmental policy looks like in at the state level in California. Since the Golden State has an ambitious environmental preservation plan, there will be a lot of content. To make this class more manageable, we will be focusing on two areas specifically: water and energy. Finally, we will spend that last few weeks of the course learning about environmental justice, and specifically, how climate change impacts Indigenous communities in California and how the state is mitigating the impact. All major backgrounds are welcome.
  • Trip Description:
    Our Spring Break trip will be a road trip across Northern California. We will start at Stanford and head down the coast and cut through Bakersfield to get to the Sierra Nevada Mountains where we will spend a night in Yosemite. Our trip will conclude with a day of meeting with policymakers in Sacramento. On this trip, we will be visiting various power plants, participate in a beach clean-up, and learn about conservation in a national park.
Custom Question: 
What do you most enjoy and least enjoy about the environment? Why?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Originally from Orange County, California, Matthew is a junior majoring in Political Science and Earth Systems. Outside of class, he is an ASSU Senator, Vice President of Stanford College Democrats, and Stanford Student Enterprises Board Member. Matthew is passionate about energy policy and plans to spend most of his life in the private sector advocating for environmentally friendly energy. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, reading the news, and playing golf. Contact information: mcohen18@stanford.edu
Biography:
Elizabeth is a junior double majoring in International Relations and Science, Technology, and Society. Elizabeth came to Stanford with plans to go to medical school, but she was was still largely undecided on what to do with her life in general. After suffering through two quarters of chemistry, she decided to explore the other opportunities at Stanford. After taking a course entitled “Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response,” Elizabeth was set on becoming the next Anderson Cooper. On campus, Elizabeth is also an IR peer advisor, an opinions desk editor for The Stanford Daily, the community manager for Stanford Dance Marathon, the chief information officer of Stanford Bitcoin Club, and an active member of Stanford Jump Rope. In her free time, Elizabeth enjoys catching up on sleep. Contact information: entrinh@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - From Palestine to North America: Indigenous Struggles and Solidarity

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
From Palestine to North America: Indigenous Struggles and Solidarity
Trip Location: 
New Mexico
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

The idea for this trip came from our own personal experiences and involvement with indigenous issues. As indigenous people to two entirely different contexts, our communities have witnessed similarities in political, economic, and social disadvantages when it comes to our racial, ethnic, and national identities. From Palestine to North America: Indigenous Struggles and Solidarity aims to examine the similarities, differences, and contemporary implications of two separate indigenous struggles for land, resources, and self-determination. A few similarities include the experience of land dispossession and the ramifications of colonial settlement on education, health systems, culture, language and natural resources.  We will be looking at the histories of Palestinians and Indigenous North Americans within the frameworks of settler colonialism and ethnic cleansing.

 

We hope to give students an immersive experience by meeting with local solidarity organizations and visiting Chasity’s home reservation in New Mexico. Meeting with Arab and Palestinian community members in the Bay Area will give students a better idea of how immigrant and diasporic communities are mobilizing to better the prospects for Palestinian self-determination. We’ll spend spring break trip in Acoma Pueblo, Chasity’s home, engaging in service activities and meeting with community organizations, elders, tribal leaders, and youth.


The overall goal of this course is to explore the historic parallels between the Palestinian and Indigenous North American experiences as a means of understanding how those parallels inform community organizing and grassroots movements today. We hope for students to walk away with a deeper understanding of the indigenous experience in relations to a land - from history to current experiences to remnants of the past, and the implications for the future.

Custom Question: 
1.What previous experience or knowledge do you have with Palestine/Israel and/or Indigenous American issues? Prior experience/knowledge are not criteria for admission to this ASB trip. Trip leaders would like to gauge knowledge in order to develop the syllabus accordingly. 2.If you don’t have prior experience/knowledge (or even if you do), what specific issues or aspects would you like to learn more about?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
My name is Ramah Awad and I’m a senior at Stanford in History and Anthropology. My focus, academically, is the Middle East and issues relating to forced migration. While I was born and raised in the Bay Area, I had the opportunity to reconnect with my Palestinian roots when I moved to the West Bank for high school. Since coming to Stanford, I’ve been most actively involved with Palestine solidarity work through Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), both locally and nationally. A crucial component of Palestine solidarity organizing has been situating the struggle for Palestinian liberation within larger conversation and action involving other anti-colonial and anti-imperial movements. I am so excited to be co-leading an ASB Trip that aims to examine how two indigenous’ peoples movements intersect at the struggle for livelihood and self-determination. I remember how formative my own ASB experience my freshman year was for my own personal and political growth, and my hope for this trip is to give students the opportunity to grapple with relevant issues, both contextually and critically. Contact information: ramah95@stanford.edu
Biography:
Hi! My name is Chasity Salvador. I'm from the Pueblo of Acoma which is the oldest continuously inhabited place in the United States. As a tribe, Acoma Pueblo consists of approximately 5,000 people that have appreciation for the Acoma lands we have grown to love and take care of long before any arrival, dating back to 1200 A.D. Acoma is a community whose values, and spiritual/cultural prosperity require a an understanding of the land, each other, and our traditional ways of governing ourselves. The type of connection I have to Acoma translates to everything that I am interested in at Stanford. I am majoring in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Sociology with a special interest in exploring the Native American experience as it relates to racial, environmental, economic, socio-economic, and food injustice that still heavily exist in our country. I am currently studying in Hawai’i through the Wrigley Field Program in Hawai’i, a program through Stanford to learn how indigenous populations are understanding and acting upon remnants of settler colonialism by organizing community cultural restoration, language revitalization, and community unity. I’m excited to co-lead this ASB class that aspires to shed light on how these community actions are result of and a remedy to the ethnic cleansing committed upon my people. My hope is to give the students the opportunity to understand the local, regional, and national issues that indigenous populations face everyday. Additionally, the goal is to draw parallels between the experience and solidarity between the Palestinian and Native American populations and the anti-colonial and anti-imperial movements that created by these populations. Contact information: chasitys@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Health and the Harvest: Migrant Farmworker Health in California

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Health and the Harvest: Migrant Farmworker Health in California
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
  • Course Description:
    Responsible for the produce and other food that we consume multiple times everyday, farmworkers have an important role in America’s workforce. Also one of society’s most marginalized groups, farmworkers experience distinct economic and political disadvantages, resulting in health outcomes that are overlooked and unattended to. Advocating for farmworker’s rights is also challenging given the complex characteristics of the population.
    In preparation for our spring break trip, we will address the topic of migrant farmworker health from multiple perspectives. We will learn about some of the immigration history relating to farmworkers in California as well as present-day policies that affect this population. Taking a more holistic approach to health, we will also work to understand the barriers migrant farmworkers face in accessing consistent and quality health care. The class will analyze the structure of the agricultural market and see where farmworkers lie on its chain. Facilitated by a multi-faceted approach, our class will piece together the combination of obstacles at various levels that continue to place migrant farmworkers at a disadvantage.
  • Trip Description:


    Do you like road trips and friends?


    During this weeklong service-learning trip, participants will travel around northern and central California to engage with the communities and organizations relevant to the farmworker population.  We will seek to both challenge and grow our understanding of issues related to farmworker health by interacting with healthcare professionals, policy makers, farm owners, and community advocates from a variety of viewpoints on the issue. Participants will engage in and question what it means to provide ethical and effective service to a community. Throughout the trip, we will reflect on the conversations we have and the places we visit each day.
Custom Question: 
Why is learning about farmworker health important to you? What do you hope to gain from this experience?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Janelle is a sophomore studying Public Policy with specific interests in education, community health, and urban studies. Last year, Janelle was a participant on this Alternative Spring Break course where she was deeply inspired by the variety of people she met working to improve the livelihoods of farm workers. In addition to learning interesting information, the friends and memories she made were a highlight of this trip as well. Excited to be returning and leading this trip with Javier, Janelle hopes this experience is as transformative to others as it was for her. When she manages to get free time, Janelle loves spending it by listening to music, being active, or hanging out with good people. Contact information: millerjm@stanford.edu
Biography:
Javier is a sophomore from Oakland, CA studying Human Biology and on the pre-med track. He has a deep interest in medicine, and aspires to be a doctor who is also knowledgeable on the topics of community and public health. Javier loves to exercise although with school it can be difficult to keep up a regular schedule at times. He also would like to spend more time hiking around and at the beach. Participating in this ASB last year was an amazing experience and made him want to go on it once again. The people he met were very inspirational, this trip showed him a completely different way of exploring and learning. He is very excited to co-lead this trip with Janelle and can’t wait to meet all the new participants. Contact information: jaguayo2@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Housing as a Human Right: Exploring Housing Justice from the Global to the Particular

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Housing as a Human Right: Exploring Housing Justice from the Global to the Particular
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
  • Trip Description:
    • During the trip at the end of the quarter, students will be provided opportunities to apply the metrics and methods of thought used during the quarter to think about housing justice and ideas about housing as a human right in the Bay Area.


      We will be meeting with various kinds of changemakers as their work relates to housing in the Bay Area, from community organizers to real estate developers to policy makers.


      Along with learning from and about the various actors in housing policy in the Bay Area, we will take time to engage with our community partners based on the community partners’ needs and our capacity during the week of the trip. We will also be writing letters to local legislators in order to influence their decisions about housing policy, or at the very least, better inform them of the opinions of some of their constituents. Other engagements might include drafting statements to help advise Bay Area development companies or canvassing areas for signatories in order to help local housing organizations.
  • Course Description:
    • Is it useful to conceptualize housing through a human rights lens? Are there ethical tools that we can use to think about housing that can work on a variety of different scales? This one-unit course aims to explore ideas about human rights as they intersect with ideas about housing. We will begin the class by examining philosophical ideas of what exactly are human rights and then move through different scales of context to discuss what housing as a human right can mean on international, national, regional, and particular levels. As the course examines these different geographic levels of scale, we will use human rights theory to understand each type of housing landscape. We will also consider the scales at hand through the lenses of civil engineering, policy formation, and individual narratives.


      In each of the contexts we explore, we will also consider the way in which community engagement and different kinds of activism can potentially move people and housing markets to a place of actualized equity and justice.


      By the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the kinds of questions and metrics that can be used to think about housing in both a theoretical and concrete manner, which will help them make engaged and ethical decisions about where to live and how to engage with communities while there. The course is open to all students and there are aspects of the course that will be designed to provide intellectual engagement for a diversity of disciplinary backgrounds. Students do not need to have any kind of particular disciplinary training or specific knowledge about human rights or the social landscape of housing in order to partake in the class and the trip.

Custom Question: 
After watching the two videos, what are some of the similarities and differences between how people are interacting with their housing landscape in Durban and Buena Vista? Why does housing matter? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fZWIZX_8ub8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Srap9PI6v6o
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Mina Shah is a Master’s student in African Studies, having completed her undergraduate degree here at Stanford in Comparative Literature. She is extremely passionate about social justice and equity, especially racial justice and educational equity. Mina has been involved with the Haas Center for Public Service through Undergraduate Fellowships, Education Partnerships, and now the Alternative Breaks program. She is working on thinking about best practices for including ethics and justice frameworks in her academic, professional and personal lives and is excited to teach this course on housing as a human right because of the way in which the issue of housing and housing justice is so foundational and related to other forms of justice. Contact Information: minashah@stanford.edu
Biography:
Vimbainashe Anda is a junior studying Civil Engineering. Most of her classes have focused on the structural design of buildings, the study of the materials used and construction management strategies. Participating in this ASB trip last year exposed her to the social aspect of her work, the need to be mindful of communities, the importance of policy and the power of individual voices. It also helped her to reflect on her own context in her home country, Zimbabwe. In facilitating the class, Vimbainashe hopes participants and facilitators both will not only study housing in the Bay Area and how we can be agents of change, but expand our thinking to reach across multiple contexts around the country and the world. S.D.G. Contact information: vanda2@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Migration is Beautiful: Histories, Policies, and Realities of Immigrant Justice

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Migration is Beautiful: Histories, Policies, and Realities of Immigrant Justice
Trip Location: 
Washington D.C.
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
  • Trip Description:

    The recent anti-immigrant rhetoric espoused by some powerful players in the political arena has brought to light the nativism that has been present throughout American history. This has historically resulted in policies targeting specific immigrant communities, creating a hostile environment for immigrants and distorting our perceptions of the immigrant experience, with direct consequences for their personal well-being and that of their families.

    To combat the one-sided anti-immigrant rhetoric, we will attempt to understand the many aspects of the immigrant experience from activists, organizers, and immigrants themselves. During our winter course, we will learn about domestic labor, education disparities, healthcare access, mass deportation and detention, and immigrant political participation. We will work our way up to think about the conversations surrounding contemporary immigration reform movements, and participate in service by working with advocacy organizations. Our spring break trip will take us to Washington, D.C. to meet with various organizations, think tanks, and policy makers to examine the politics, first-hand, of US immigration in the capital of America. Our ultimate goal as students and learners on this service-learning trip is to gain a critical understanding of how coalition-building and sustained movements can ultimately affect the conversations surrounding immigration reform.

 

  • Course Description:  

    We will begin by analyzing the history of immigration politics and policy in the United States. How did immigrants fit into and complicate the constructed racial hierarchy throughout history? What characterized the waves of migration to the United States? How have the undocumented been marginalized, and what are the ways in which communities have responded? By taking a historical approach to policy implementation, we will begin to see how the immigrant community has been affected, including policy’s long-lasting impacts on education, criminal justice, health, and political representation.

    We will discuss the varying perceptions of immigrants today, how these ideas may be mischaracterized, and how such views can impact political attitudes and affect policy decision-making. Although the course and the trip are designed to educate ourselves about national immigration policy, we will also spend some time in this course narrowing in on the Bay Area as a case study.

Custom Question: 
Why are you interested in immigration and why do you think immigration is important in the US?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Jeanette Rios: I am a junior from Ontario, CA majoring in Human Biology with a concentration in Global Health. During my time at Stanford, I have been involved in CHE, the Cardinal Free Clinics, and VILA. I’ve participated in two previous ASBs and have found them to be some of my highlights while at Stanford. I loved meeting all the participants and getting to learn about their interests and meeting with all the incredible organization. Being the daughter of two Mexican immigrants, I’ve always been very interested in immigrant policies and learning more about how access to healthcare and education can be improved for these communities. I look forward to expanding my own knowledge even more with this ASB! Contact information: jrios2@stanford.edu
Biography:
Diana Zhao: I’m a junior double-majoring in Biology and CSRE with a concentration in Race & Policy. I’m interested in how public policies informed by economic decisions shape the lives and attitudes of people of color in unexpected ways. I’ve been involved with the Bridge, We Continue, UNICEF, and have interests in health policy and behavioral clinical research. Because I’m from an immigrant family, it’s been fascinating to live the consequences of immigration policy and then learn about how it has affected not only my life but the lives of everyone around me. ASB has been one of the most genuine, thought-provoking experiences I’ve had in my time at Stanford, and I’m very excited to pay it forward by sharing what I know, and most importantly, learning from everyone in our ASB class! My hobbies include: reading, writing fiction or poetry (when I get really angsty), visiting historical monuments and museums, hanging out with Jeanette, and finding new hobbies. Contact information: dyzhao@stanford.edu

ASB 2016-2017 - Redefining STEM

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Redefining STEM
Trip Location: 
California Bay Area
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

STEM is the buzzword, hashtag, and movement of the decade. “Innovation”, “success”, and “Silicon Valley” are words we hear everyday here at Stanford. We know about STEM from all the publications, programs, and pipettes. But impactful science is meant to be more than your PSET due Monday.

 

This class aims to examine STEM as a social issue through four main intersections: culture/history of STEM, STEM education, science communication, and corporate science & service. We hope to tackle questions such as: How has racial violence and gender discrimination affected the history of science and Silicon Valley?, What are some initiatives to communicate science to the next generation?, and What exactly does it means to be an ethical scientist and member of society? Because this class covers a breadth of topics, we welcome educators, scientists, and anyone interested in STEM. With this interdisciplinary group of “techies” and “fuzzies”, we aim to redefine STEM from a social angle.


During the trip, we will explore how science is and is not being communicated in the Bay Area. We will visit different science museums (ie. Exploratorium, Tech Museum, and CA Academy of Sciences), academic/research institutions, nonprofits, and companies. In addition, there will be opportunities to directly serve and interact with the community at certain museums to gain insight into their experiences with science education, outreach, and their effectiveness.

Custom Question: 
Describe one social issue in STEM that you have personally encountered or heard about. How was it addressed (or not)? How do you think that situation should have played out?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Flora’s bio: Hi! I am a sophomore from San Francisco/Daly City, CA. Interested in how computer science can be used in medicine, I am a potential Biomedical Computation major. I have worked in bio-research labs, with Science in Service last year, and with Girls Who Code this past summer. Last year, I went on the Rosebud Resilience ASB and loved it, so this year, Jenny (my floor-mate, chemistry lab partner, CS partner, and travel partner) and I wanted to continue being involved with ASB by leading our own. I am super excited to share this experience of learning what it means to be an ethical and impactful scientist with our participants! Some fun facts about me: I have a twin brother, I ran two half marathons last school year, and brownies are my weakness. Contact Information: fwang7@stanford.edu
Biography:
Jenny’s bio: Hello! I am a sophomore and Bay Area native. Having grown up in the suburbia of Silicon Valley, I have come to realize how strange a place it is, with its massive startups and its non-stop culture. I am excited to dissect and delve into all of this with our class this spring! Although undeclared, I am considering becoming a Symbolic Systems major in the Learning concentration. If I could, though, I would minor in everything from education to psychology to urban studies to chemistry. I am constantly on the lookout for exciting intersections between science and education, such as with the Notation in Science Communication and education groups such as Breakthrough Silicon Valley, Stanford Splash, and SPREES. Aside from classes, I am prone to podcasts, Wikipedia spirals, and spontaneous bike rides. Contact Information: jlhan@stanford.edu