Alternative Spring Break 2013-2014 - Beyond the Rage: Filipino-American Diaspora, Identity, Activism, and Community Engagement

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Alternative Spring Break 2013-2014
Trip Name: 
Beyond the Rage: Filipino-American Diaspora, Identity, Activism, and Community Engagement
Trip Location: 
Bay Area, CA
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Currently, about 4,700 Filipinos leave the Philippines every day in search of finding jobs and wages that they desperately could not find in their homeland. Many of these Filipinos migrate from the Philippines to the United States, where an estimated four million Filipinos live. Of these four million Filipinos, one-fourth are undocumented immigrants. These migrants seeking better lives for their families often find nothing but oppression, injustice, and suffering. With such staggering statistics, why is so little known about the struggles and challenges faced by Filipinos and Filipino-Americans?

 

Join us this winter as we seek to address the underlying issues leading up to the Filipino diaspora by following the stories of immigrants from the Philippines to America. We will shed light upon the roots of the modern day challenges of Filipinos, from issues of identity, family, and basic human rights. This includes unjust immigration policies, workers’ rights, access to affordable housing and education. Through a close examination of Filipino and Filipino-American histories, we hope to gain a comprehensive understanding of the factors that have led to the current conditions of Filipinos. By providing deeper insight on contemporary issues affecting the Filipino community, we hope to empower participants to consider our roles as Stanford students and our individual capacities for creating social change.

 

During spring break, we will bridge lessons and themes from the classroom to the community by integrating with local grassroots organizations from the Bay Area to Central and Southern California. Some of these organizations include community centers, cultural art collectives, workers’ rights organizations, government agencies, and professional associations.

 

While our studies focus on one particular ethnic group, many of the conditions that plague Filipinos transcend ethnic and cultural boundaries. Our goal is to instill a greater understanding within each participant - regardless of their ethnicity - of the social conditions that surround them. While the subject matter may seem enraging, we challenge our participants to take action and go beyond the rage.

Trip Leaders
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Debra Pacio

Hi all! My name is Debra, and I’m a junior majoring in English Literature. I originally hail from Baguio City, Philippines, but immigrated to the United States at the age of 3 and have been a San Jose native ever since. My public service interests primarily focus on poverty and education, but I’ve developed a stronger interest in understanding Filipino and immigration issues since joining the Pilipino American Student Union (PASU) and Anakbayan Silicon Valley. Participating in last year’s Filipino-American issues ASB has led me to have a deeper investment in community engagement and the works of local service organizations. Thanks to ASB, I had the opportunity to serve as a summer mentor for Galing Bata, a program for the youth of the South of Market (SOMA) district of San Francisco. I hope to give back to the community as one of the co-leaders for this year’s ASB.  ...And in my literary mood, I must conclude (in the words of poet, Dylan Thomas), “Rage, rage, against the dying of the light!”Join our ASB fam and apply tonight! :)

Edward Salonga

Hello everyone! My name is Edward Salonga, but everybody calls me Ed. I am a sophomore, and I was born and raised on the beautiful island of Guam. I'll be leading this year’s Filipino-American Issues ASB, and I'm really stoked to build deeper relationships with our participants and the community around us. Over the summer, I worked with various Filipino organizations and community members in the San Francisco area by interning at the Filipino Community Center. Getting to know Filipino communities outside of Stanford, both through ASB and the Filipino Community Center, was one of my favorite experiences, and I hope to expose other students to the great communities outside the Stanford bubble. On campus, I am the Social Co-Chair of the Pilipino-American Student Union (PASU). Outside the bubble, I am a member of the Education committee within Anakbayan Silicon Valley, a comprehensive youth organization that aims to unite youth in the struggle for positive change. Stay enraged!