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ASB 2017-2018 - Asian American Issues: From Identity to Action

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Asian American Issues: From Identity to Action
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

What does it mean to be “Asian American”? Do “Asian” and “Asian American” mean the same thing? Is the term “Asian American” a paradox?

 

These questions reveal that the term “Asian American,” while seemingly simple and all-encompassing, often casts Asian Americans as a homogeneous group—rendering invisible the complexities behind the Asian American identity. This includes a broad range of challenges affecting Asian Americans of all ages and backgrounds: from workers’ and immigrant rights to racism, healthcare, LGBTQ issues, education, and more. Asian Americans have been present in the United States for four centuries, but much of their stories are underrepresented. Thus, the Alternative Spring Break Program will bring Asian American issues to light and inspect them with critical lenses.

 

In this Alternative Spring Break trip, we will analyze how social, political, and economic factors affect the formation of identities and use this framework to critically process and confront the messages we see about Asian Americans. First, we will explore the Asian American identity, the history of Asians in America, and the Asian American Movement. Then, we will use this knowledge to study a broad range of contemporary campaigns such as workers’ and immigrant rights, LGBTQ intersectionality, environmental justice, and educational and socioeconomic disparities. We will also explore how Asian Americans have organized together across cultures to build solidarity and fight for justice. By exploring this spectrum, we will examine our own commonalities with these issues, regardless of our ethnic or cultural background. We will also explore these topics through different media of activism: art, community organizing, health services, and more.

Custom Question: 
Describe a situation that made you aware of your identity (racial, ethnic, religious, gender, etc) To whom did it matter? You? A friend? A stranger? Why did it make a difference?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
My name is Momo (they/she) and I’m a fifth year undergrad double majoring in Music and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE). I used to be a Product Design major, but switched to CSRE last year, which is why I’m taking an extra year to finish up my undergraduate career. I grew up in San Diego, and most of my friends were second-generation Asian American like me. As a frosh at Stanford, I wanted to be involved with Asian American community, but had some discouraging experiences and did not follow through. My junior year, I applied to ASB (on a whim, to be perfectly honest), and it was a transformative experience for me. That spring quarter, I finally joined student groups like Queer & Asian and Stanford Asian American Activism Committee, and also enrolled in my first CSRE class. This Asian American Issues ASB taught me so much about Asian American history that I never knew before, and allowed me to engage with my Asian American and Japanese identities in ways that weren’t available to me before. (Also I learned how to drive a mini-van full of people and luggage up the hills of SF Chinatown without destroying anyone or anything--I’m ready for round two this year.) The connections I made on this trip led me to develop new friendships in the Asian American community outside of Stanford, such as community organizations in San Francisco and East Bay. These community ties that I have, both at Stanford and outside of Stanford, are relationships that I still cherish today because they keep me grounded in who I am and who I want to be. I am so excited to share these experiences with this year’s participants! Contact info: amhoshi@stanford.edu
Biography:
Hi! I’m Huanvy (they/she) and I’m a second-year majoring in Asian American Studies and Philosophy. I’m originally from Arizona, where there was a significant absence of Asian-Americans, and I came to Stanford knowing that I wanted to dive head-first into the robust and thriving API community. I joined the Stanford Vietnamese Student Association, Stanford Asian American Activism Committee, and Queer & Asian - all of which proved to be wonderful and uplifting communities that have helped me develop my identity. I decided to participate in the Asian American Issues (AAI) ASB last year because I wanted an immersive experience to meet with community leaders and further explore the intersectionalities of Asian-American identity. ASB proved to be the most fulfilling experience of my Stanford career - it was on the AAI ASB where I not only made close friends and tender memories, but I also truly felt a sense of community and affirmation that my existence is valid. I was able to gain a deeper understanding of the issues that affect the API community and I learned about solutions to fight against our oppressors. The AAI ASB transformed my mindset - I actually declared Asian American Studies the week we returned from the trip! I hope this trip will be as valuable and transformative for this year’s participants as it was for me, and I am excited to share this experience with those who attend! Contact information: huanvyp@stanford.edu

ASB 2017-2018 - Capital or Community: Housing Inequality in the Bay Area

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Capital or Community: Housing Inequality in the Bay Area
Trip Location: 
Bay Area, California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 
    • During the end-of-quarter trip, students will explore the different levels of housing inequality in the Bay Area as it relates to marginalized communities in San Francisco, San Jose, Oakland, and right here in our Palo Alto community.

    • We will be meeting with various changemakers as their work relates to housing in the Bay Area, from community organizers to policy makers.

    • Along with learning from and about the various actors in housing inequality in the Bay Area, we will take time to engage with our community organizations based on their needs and our capacity during the trip.

  • Course Description:

    • How has housing policy played a role in the marginalization of various groups in the United States?  Are there concrete ways of addressing the current housing crisis in the Bay Area? How are individuals such as Stanford students affected by housing, and how do they impact it?

    • This one unit course aims to explore ideas about housing inequality as they intersect with marginalized groups in the Bay Area, including immigrants and people of color.

    • We will begin the class by looking at the history of urban planning and housing policy in various cities to look at how housing issues have played a role in the nature of marginalized groups, and how that affects these groups to this day. We’ll explore major cities such as New York and Chicago before examining the history of San Francisco. We’ll later focus on current housing inequality issues in the Bay Area and a look at what community organizations have done to address these issues.

    • By the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the intersections that come with housing rights issues, especially as it relates to the Bay Area. The course is open to all students from all backgrounds and interests. Students do not need to have any kind of particular disciplinary training or specific knowledge about housing or the social landscape of different marginalized groups in order to partake in the class and the trip.

Custom Question: 
Watch this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=awPVY1DcupE) and respond to this question: What priorities should the city have when serving the various communities and generating revenue?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Edwin Carlos (he/him) is a sophomore majoring in Psychology and minoring in Education. He is the son of immigrant Filipino parents, born in Miami, Florida and raised in Renton, Washington. He spends most of his time organizing in the Filipinx-American community with the Pilipino-American Student Union and Anakbayan, but has recently been dedicating more time to the greater Asian-American community. He had a very reaffirming experience as a participant in the Pilipinx Issues Alternative Spring Break last spring, as well as the Japanese-American ThanksGiving Back trip last fall, and hopes to bring those intersections into this ASB. His goals this year include creating his own social psychological research studies, building the Filipinx-American and Asian-American community on campus, and becoming the best Super Smash Bros. Melee player on campus. He hopes to create strong personal connections and a greater sense of community through this trip. E-mail me with questions at ecarlos@stanford.edu
Biography:
Chris Phan (she/her) is in her third year here, majoring in Computer Science and minoring in Urban Studies. Born and raised in Tacoma, Washington, she spends the majority of her time running, dancing, and looking up transit-related memes. At college, you can find her in (in order of likelihood) the Asian American Activities Center, any given third-wave-millennial-coffee-shop, or longboarding around a parking garage. After her experience on the Pilipinx Issues Alternative Spring Break and Hong Kong: Human Cities Initiative trip, she’s co-leading this ASB on housing rights in an effort to bring together compassionate and diverse groups and looking for good vibes, memorable talks, and an unforgettable community. Contact her at cxphan@stanford.edu.

ASB 2017-2018 - Childhood Nutrition By Design

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Childhood Nutrition By Design
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Many children in the United States experience some form of malnutrition - either not receiving enough calories, receiving too many calories, or experiencing a deficiency in vitamins and nutrients. Even though many individuals can describe more or less what a balanced, nutritious diet looks like, for one reason or another their behaviors contradict what they know to be healthy.

 

Our trip is focused on working proactively using human centered design thinking techniques to address the issues of childhood nutrition as a serious health disparity. What this means is we will be focusing our service work on the socioeconomic differences that disproportionately plague certain communities. You will have the opportunity to meet and work with both groups at the forefront of innovation around childhood nutrition, as well as the children who themselves are impacted. In addition, you will work in teams to use your insights to innovate a fresh approach to solving an identified issue in childhood nutrition, test and iterate on that approach over the course of the class and trip.

Custom Question: 
Describe the ideal school cafeteria. Include details about the food, the layout, the people, the vibe - as much description as you can fit.
Trip Leaders
Biography:
I'm Ei! I'm a Human Biology Major concentrating in Design and Public Health interventions. I am a huge foodie and spend lots of my time hunting out places to eat or cooking something I'm craving. I'm interested in the realm of nutrition and health behaviors as well as preventative measures to chronic diseases that are the health outcomes of these behaviors. My expertise is in design thinking for health but I'm also passionate about service and playing a part in alleviating health disparities in low socioeconomic communities.
Biography:
Hi everyone! My name is Nick, and I’m a senior majoring in Human Biology with a concentration in child healthcare and policy. I became interested in some of the questions this ASB trip is looking at during the start of my sophomore year, and have been exploring the realm of preventative health ever since. Many of the questions around childhood nutrition have components that live in the world of service and nonprofits, and I’m excited to introduce you all to this field! I’m a huge fan of cooking and trying new recipes and foods, and look forward to doing so throughout our time together.

ASB 2017-2018 - Design Thinking for Social Innovation: Japan and Stanford Exchange

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Design Thinking for Social Innovation: Japan and Stanford Exchange
Trip Location: 
Bay Area, California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
6
Trip Description: 

Design thinking has taken Stanford and the global innovation community by storm. Social innovators and educators in both the US and Japan are asking how design thinking can reach its potential to create positive impact. This spring break, we will use design thinking to examine social issues that especially affect urban areas (such as homelessness, infrastructure, sustainability, etc.) and consider Japanese approaches to urban planning in order to produce new insights and improvements. This will take the form of interviews, observations, group discussions, and partnerships with local organization(s).

 

In collaboration with VIA’s Social Innovation Program, 20 college students interested in social change will be flying in from Japan to join us for a hands-on project experience addressing current challenges and opportunities in urban areas. Stanford students will lead discussions on urban issues and culture, as well as participate in organization visits in the Bay Area, offering the unique opportunity to hear from different perspectives, exchange ideas, and learn from each other across cultures.

 

If you are interested in creating inclusive spaces for people of all cultures to discuss design thinking, social innovation, and urban issues, join today!

Custom Question: 
This trip involves synthesizing multiple fields and perspectives -- namely, design thinking, Japanese culture, and urban studies. What is significant to you about learning these topics in conjunction with each other?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hi everyone! My name is Kevin and I'm a senior studying Product Design with a minor in Japanese Studies. I'm so excited to lead this ASB trip -- not only because it fits squarely into my academic studies, but I think it will also provide a unique and nuanced application of both design thinking and an understanding of Japanese culture. Last summer I worked as a designer for a stationery company in Tokyo, which was a very enlightening experience for me. It showed me how important it is to collaborate between different ways of thinking, and I hope that the course will be a learning experience for everyone (myself included)!

ASB 2017-2018 - Domestic Workers Rights

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Domestic Workers Rights
Trip Location: 
Bay Area, California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Domestic work is part of everyone’s lives. At Stanford, campus workers sauté and boil and chop and scrub and mop for us. In various home lives, family members may cook and clean and care for us. Domestic work is the often unseen and frequently unvalued forms of labor that structure and make possible our everyday lives—forms of feminized and racialized and classed work that persist outside legal protections and remain subjugated by institutionalized value systems. In this Alternative Spring Break course and trip, we will move through various strands of work on affect, productivity, (inter)dependence, transnationalism, justice, ability, debility, race, class, sexuality, gender, citizenship, labor, care, service.

 

Through collaborations with Bay Area organizations related to domestic work, we hope to explore the centrality of domestic work to all other work, some emergent grassroots movements for dignity and justice, and how we might begin to transform the practices of our own day to day lives.

Custom Question: 
What is your relationship to domestic work?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Oscar Lee is a BA with Honors candidate in Anthropology, currently working on a thesis about the accumulations of feeling and finance in the luxury fashion industry. He is originally from New Jersey and has interests in contemporary art, labor markets, and political economy. On campus, Oscar is a banking manager at Stanford Student Enterprises' Capital Group, kitchen manager at 576 Alvarado Row, and member of the Judicial Panel.
Biography:
Maya Burke is a senior BA candidate in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, with a concentration in Identity, Diversity and Aesthetics. She grew up in both Kentucky and Uganda. In her free time she gardens and plays music. At Stanford, Maya is an RA at 576 Alvarado Row and a Fellow at the Institute for Diversity in the Arts.

ASB 2017-2018 - Environmental Storytelling

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Environmental Storytelling
Trip Location: 
California
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

In the current political climate, environmental issues matter more than ever, and it’s up to us to make a difference, take a stance, design, and innovate for the future. However, as individuals, we may often struggle to make meaningful impact. This course will empower you to understand what makes a message matter, equipping you with the ethical frameworks to think critically about existing environmental campaigns and activist movements, as well as forge your own. This trip will engage students with individuals and organizations along the California Coast involved in nature photography, grassroots organizing, and environmental lobbying from the Bay Area to Monterey. Spanning the arts, media journalism, social activism, and policy, among other topics, environmental storytelling makes people listen.

Custom Question: 
A large portion of storytelling is communicating messages in a way that’s accessible and attractive. Drawing from an example (slogans, movements, memes, etc.), what do you think makes an idea contagious?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Julie is a sophomore majoring in Urban Studies interested in the intersections of technology, environmental engineering, and the arts. Some of the issues that matter to her are communicating marginalized identities through the arts and promoting sustainable and just development in urban design. On campus, you can find her fundraising for CS+Social Good, rocking out with the Stanford Marching Band, or posting in ideas.
Biography:
Hikaru: Originally from Yokohama, Japan, Hikaru is a sophomore who is majoring in Bioengineering. Outside of the classroom, he is the financial officer of the International Undergraduate Community, and works as a lab assistant at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Hikaru is passionate about marine life conservation and has worked with organizations such as Project Aware to coordinate awareness campaigns and underwater cleanups. In his spare time, he enjoys SCUBA diving the world’s oceans and playing pickup basketball.

ASB 2017-2018 - Migration is Beautiful: Histories, Realities, and Policies of Immigrant Justice

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Migration is Beautiful: Histories, Realities, and Policies of Immigrant Justice
Trip Location: 
Washington D.C.
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

In the current political landscape, many political stakeholders have endorsed anti-immigrant policies using inflammatory rhetoric that has disturbed American attitudes toward immigration. This course challenges the underlying assumptions of this discourse. We will begin by analyzing the history of immigration policy and politics in the United States. We will discuss specific issues related to border control, detention, and law enforcement and then delve into the intersections of immigration, criminal justice, health, and education policies. Throughout, we will emphasize the importance of using empirical data and personal narratives when analyzing and participating in the contemporary discourse on immigration-related issues.

 

Our spring break trip will take us to Washington, D.C. to meet leaders from activist organizations, government agencies, and immigrant communities in an attempt to understand the many aspects of the immigrant experience. We will engage in conversation with policymakers about contemporary immigration reform and volunteer with organizations supporting immigrant communities. Our ultimate goal as students and learners on this service-learning trip is to gain a critical understanding of how coalition-building and sustained movements can ultimately affect the conversations surrounding immigration reform.

Custom Question: 
How have your personal experiences uniquely shaped your perspective of the immigrant experience and immigration policy?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
My name is Marisol Zarate and I am a junior from San Bernardino, California. I am majoring in Political Science and Urban Studies. At Stanford, I am heavily involved in the Latinx community. I work at El Centro Chicano y Latino, and am also a member of MEChA de Stanford, Mariachi Cardenal, the First-Generation and/or Low-Income Partnership and Sigma Theta Psi Multicultural Sorority. My freshman year, I participated in the Mobilizing Democracy: Campaigns, Elections and Voting ASB trip and it was completely life-changing. In fact, the ASB trip is what convinced me to major in Political Science! Leading this trip is particularly exciting for me because as a daughter of immigrants, I am passionate about immigration issues and its intersections with the justice system and welfare. I can’t wait to learn from one another through the course and trip! Contact information: marisolz@stanford.edu
Biography:
I am a junior from Winder, GA majoring in Public Policy with a concentration in Health Care Policy. During my time at Stanford, I have been involved in student government as the ASSU Elections Commissioner and have volunteered as a research assistant at the Stanford Hospital Emergency Department. I’ve participated in two previous ASBs to Washington, D.C.--including last year's Migration is Beautiful trip--and they have been the highlight of my time here. Coming from an immigrant family, I am interested in the intersection of immigration and health care as it relates to policy and medicine. I look forward to returning to this trip and learn even more with this ASB! Contact information: pserrato@stanford.edu

ASB 2017-2018 - Rewiring the “Electric Brain”: Exploring the Role of Tech in Language Revitalization

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Rewiring the “Electric Brain”: Exploring the Role of Tech in Language Revitalization
Trip Location: 
North Carolina
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

In the Cherokee language, computers are sometimes called “anagalisgi unvtsida meaning electric brain. As time and technologies quickly progress, Cherokee people have developed ways to bring their language into the modern era. However, only 400 (approx.)  fluent speakers are left in the Eastern Band alone, which has made saving the language a key priority. Through our course and trip, we will explore how technology can assist second language Cherokee learners in their race to learn the language. Our guiding question throughout the course will center on how we can move the role of tech in language revitalization beyond recording words and phrases into databases, to a more central and interactive place within community language learning.

 

Along with basic Cherokee language instruction, the course will explore topics ranging from Cherokee culture to user-centered design processes. The course will also feature guest lectures from Google’s Internationalization Team, tribal elders, Linguistics and Computer Science professors. In spring, the group will travel to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians reservation located in Cherokee, North Carolina. Participants will engage intimately with Cherokee culture and language while working closely with community members to identify tech needs and possible solutions. While in Cherokee, students will have the opportunity to visit the New Kituwah Immersion School and participate in the second annual Cherokee Language Symposium, as well as visit several community-initiated language classes. Students will also visit several sacred cultural sites as well as work with tribal members to build trails to remote sites.

 

We hope students walk away from this experience understanding the sacredness of indigenous languages and the importance of maintaining them for future generations, while acknowledging the active role tech can play in that effort.   

Custom Question: 
Tell us about any personal experience you have had with indigenous communities, indigenous languages, and/or community focused tech projects. If you have no personal experience please explain what you hope most to learn from this experience about indigenous communities, language, and their relationships with tech.
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hi! My name is Constance Owl, I’m a senior studying Native American Studies with a minor in History. I’m an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and grew up in a small community adjacent to the main reservation boundary. Carrying the strong cultural lessons taught to me as a child, I have spent my time at Stanford devoted to expanding my knowledge of indigeneity and all that the identity carries with it. I am passionate about saving our language and preserving it for future generations in accessible ways. I was once told that if you cannot speak the Cherokee language, you cannot see the world with Cherokee eyes. I hope that the work we do can ensure that the Cherokee philosophy continues on for generations to come. I am very excited to co-lead with ASB trip with Gracie to further explore the intersections of tech and cultural preservation, and hope that this course inspires people of all backgrounds and knowledge bases to become involved in language revitalization efforts.
Biography:
Hi! My name is Gracie Young, I'm a senior majoring in Computer Science. Within computer science, I study human computer interaction. I am particularly interested in merging my love of technology and Cherokee heritage through exploring ways to indigenize tech. I had the amazing opportunity to take the first Cherokee language class at Stanford my sophomore year, and I traveled to the Cherokee Language Symposium last spring with Constance. This past year, I've worked on and reccently launched "Diné Adóone’é", an Android app that helps people practice expressing Diné kinship toward another person by inputting each person's four clans and surfacing a relation -- sister, uncle, cousin, etc. I cannot wait to co-lead this ASB trip and examine how tech can help preserve culture and language when developed with and created alongside indigenous people.

ASB 2017-2018 - Seeds of Activism: Grassroots Movements in Chicago

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Seeds of Activism: Grassroots Movements in Chicago
Trip Location: 
Chicago, Illinois
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Course Description

“They tried to bury us. They didn’t know we were seeds.”

Chicago serves as a microcosm to grassroots movements occurring on a national level. The issues that affect Chicago range from gun violence to gentrification. As a city with diverse groups, Chicago has seen numerous social movements across various communities. To fight the rhetoric used against Chicago, specifically against its communities of color, we want to expose students to some of the grassroots movements and local stakeholders of these issues. We will case-study movements carried out by Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Black communities. The course will challenge students to think about Chicago’s issues in-depthfrom multifaceted perspectives that will allow us to successfully engage with the communities we meet.

 

Trip Description

The focus of this trip will be on activism involving Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Black communities. We’ll meet with community stakeholders to understand how they are affected by and how they address important issues such as structural violence and discrimination. We will visit and learn about the history of prominent activist organizations and cultural centers. In addition, we will explore the diverse neighborhoods in the city, visit museums, and sample some of the city’s classic Chicago-style cuisine. We hope that with this trip, students can better understand the active role that communities play in challenging power structures and being active changemakers. We will strive to provide a self-reflective learning experience that will contribute to both the academic and professional careers that students pursue.

Custom Question: 
What do you hope to learn from engaging with local stakeholders in Chicago?
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Guillermo was born and raised in Chicago’s West-Side neighborhood, La Villita. He is part of the class of 2020 and is a prospective major in Management Science and Engineering. He is involved in FLIP, Barrio Assistance, Los Hermanos de Stanford, and currently works at the Admissions Office. He is passionate about social justice, STEM, Chicago, deep-dish pizza, tacos and food in general. As a hobby, he likes to go to the gym, watch Netflix, read, or randomly google things. He is excited to lead an ASB in his hometown and meet other wonderful students interested in engaging in movements in Chicago. If you have any questions about this trip or the application process feel free to reach out via email at gcamari2@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Welcome! Alex is class of 2020 and a prospective Human Biology major interested in studying neuroscience and the health disparities in underserved communities. Born in the diverse city of Long Beach, CA, Alex is of Guatemalan and Mexican origin. At Stanford, he is currently involved in FLIP, Latino Fellowship (LaFe), the Phoenix Scholars, and as a TA for a course on addiction. With a strong background in community building, he is hyped to meet the incoming class and build a strong community within this ASB. He aspires to make this trip a fun and meaningful adventure of a lifetime. Please feel free to reach out with questions at fuentesa@stanford.edu.

ASB 2017-2018 - Transcending Borders: Indigenous Struggles and Solidarity

Application Form Questions: 
Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Transcending Borders: Indigenous Struggles and Solidarity
Trip Location: 
New Mexico
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

This trip and class aims to explore the pan-indigenous similarities and struggles of the people of New Mexico and Mexico, specifically Santa Clara Pueblo and Mixtec of Northern Oaxaca. Our course will give students a better idea of how immigrant and diasporic communities are mobilizing to better the prospects for indigenous self-determination on both sides of the border. We will achieve this by examining the history and modern challenges these communities face using the frameworks of traditional agriculture, language loss and revitalization, intersectional identity, and economic development. During the trip, we hope to give students an immersive experience by meeting with local solidarity organizations.We’ll spend the spring break trip in Santa Clara Pueblo, Shayna’s home, engaging in service activities and meeting with community organizations, elders, tribal leaders, and youth.

 

The overall goal of this course is to explore the historic parallels between the Mixtec and Indigenous North American experiences as a means of understanding how those parallels inform community organizing and grassroots movements today. We hope for students to walk away with a deeper understanding of the indigenous experience in relations to a land - from history to current experiences to remnants of the past, and the implications for the future.

Custom Question: 
What previous experience or knowledge do you have with global indigeneity, Mexican indigenous peoples and/or Indigenous American issues? Prior experience/knowledge are not criteria for admission to this ASB trip. Trip leaders would like to gauge knowledge in order to develop the syllabus accordingly. 2. If you do not have prior experience/knowledge (or even if you do), what specific issues or aspects would you like to learn more about? (max. 400 words)
Trip Leaders
Biography:
My name is Shayna Naranjo. I’m currently a sophomore thinking about studying Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Bringing Stanford students to my home, Santa Clara Pueblo, is an opportunity to share a part of my identity and culture that is often excluded from mainstream narratives. Santa Clara is one of the nineteen pueblos in New Mexico. We are a community of about 3,000 enrolled members, with at least 2,000 community members living in the pueblo itself. I often refer to Santa Clara Pueblo as Kha’p’o Owingeh, which is in our native language of Tewa meaning “Valley of the Wild Roses”. When in Kha’p’o, we will meet with community elders, community organizers, my family, and tribal government. There will also be hands-on activities as we learn about the traditional art of pottery making and agriculture. Throughout the trip we will reflect on the parallels of our experience and what we learned during our Winter quarter class to better understand the similarities and struggles of indigenous people separated by the United States-Mexico border.
Biography:
My name is Gianna Nino and I’m a senior majoring in Human Biology with a concentration in global public health. I’m passionate about giving back to my community. This includes my homeland in the Southern part of Mexico, Oaxaca, as well as the rural Eastern Oregon and Washington agricultural fields that raised me. My passions are ignited by the realities of my life, which have included the indigenous Mexican experience in the fields, and returning to Oaxaca to witness community health, among many others. I’ve been able to further define the trajectory of my life to include making sure that I am an advocate for the members of my communities who are often denied that, as well as an active educator in the many realms of my life from global health ethical discussions, to the discussions surrounding minority students in college. My hope is that through the trip we’re able to facilitate the learning process around communities that have often been discounted the opportunity to participate in self-determination, and participation in greater decisions that are affecting the community. I hope that the ability to structure the class with a comparative lens, we are able to building even stronger links and bonds between communities for solidarity.