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ASB 2019-2020 - Asian American Issues

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Asian American Issues
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

What does it mean to be “Asian American”? Do “Asian” and “Asian American” mean the same thing? Is the term “Asian American” a paradox? These questions reveal that the term “Asian American,” while seemingly simple and all-encompassing, often casts Asian American subjects as a homogeneous group—rendering invisible their complex and differing experiences. This includes a broad range of challenges affecting Asian Americans of all ages and backgrounds: from workers’ and immigrants’ rights to racism, healthcare, LGBTQ issues, education, and more. Asian Americans and their predecessors have been present in the United States for four centuries, but many of their stories remain untold. This Alternative Spring Break Program will bring these issues to light and inspect them with critical lenses. In this Alternative Spring Break trip, we will analyze how social, political, and economic factors affect the formation of identities and use this framework to critically process and confront the messages we see about Asian Americans. First, we will explore Asian American identities, the history of Asian subjects in America, and the Asian American Movement. Then, we will use this knowledge to study a broad range of contemporary campaigns such as workers’ and immigrant rights, LGBTQ rights, environmental justice, and educational and socioeconomic disparities. We will also explore how Asian Americans have organized together across cultures to build solidarity and fight for justice. By exploring this spectrum, we will examine our own commonalities with these issues, regardless of our ethnic or cultural background. We will also explore these topics through different media and forms of activism: art, community organizing, health services, and more.

Trip Flyer: 
Application Link: 

Please write about a time you became aware of an identity (racial, ethnic, gender, sexuality, class, religion, nationality, ability, or other) and how you responded to it.

Trip Leaders
Biography:
Ashley Huang: I’m Ashley (they/she), a junior majoring in Comparative Literature and minoring in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. I’m a second-generation Chinese-American, although I didn’t identify as such growing up. It wasn’t until I was exposed to this Alternative Spring Break trip in my sophomore year, as well as courses in the Asian American Studies department, that I began to think critically about my personal history and identity and to seek out student organizations like the Stanford Asian American Activism Committee. This ASB helped me connect my own experiences and the issues I’ve faced with a history that spans centuries. It also gave me lasting friendships and a sense of community cemented by late-night conversations and a long drive down to LA in a mini-van blaring Kpop. I can’t wait to share this trip with this year’s participants! You can contact me at ashhuang@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Jay Liu: I’m Jay (they/them), junior majoring in Chemistry and Computer Science. My parents were Chinese immigrants from the 70’s who grew up in America, and their lived experience was always an inspiration for me to find pride in the immigrant Asian community in the Bay Area. Since coming to college, I’ve been heavily involved in Stanford’s Asian American community. This is my third year working on Listen to the Silence, Stanford’s annual Asian American issues conference, and my second year on both the Asian American Activity Center’s advisory board and the Asian American Students Association. During my sophomore year, I was a pre-assign in Okada and attended this very ASB in the spring. Throughout my time at Stanford, I’ve worked on issues ranging from mental health awareness in the API community, to inclusion and diversity efforts within the API umbrella. However, I never subconsciously accepted the identity “Asian American” for myself until I participated in this ASB. Through this class and trip, I was able to tap into the narrative of a cultural undercurrent that spans a large part of American history, yet is rarely taught or told. From there, I was able to redefine my goals and think critically about how to continue to advocate effectively for my API community. Upholding the tradition this ASB represents is an important part of my effort, and I hope this experience is as inspiring and educational for this year’s participants as it was for me. I’m looking forward to seeing you in class! You can contact me at jliu99@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Asian American Issues: From Identity To Action

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Asian American Issues: From Identity To Action
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

What does it mean to be “Asian American”? Are “Asian” and “Asian American” the same thing? Is the term “Asian American” a contradiction? These questions reveal that the term “Asian American,” while seemingly simple and all-encompassing, often casts Asian Americans as a homogeneous group—rendering the complexities behind Asian American experiences invisible. This includes a broad range of challenges affecting Asian Americans of all ages and backgrounds: from workers’ and immigrants’ rights to racism, healthcare, LGBTQ issues, education, and more. Asian Americans and their predecessors have been present in the United States for four centuries, but many of their stories remain untold. This Alternative Spring Break Program will bring Asian American issues to light and inspect them with critical lenses. In this Alternative Spring Break trip, we will analyze how social, political, and economic factors affect the formation of identities and use this framework to challenge common narratives about Asian Americans. First, we will explore Asian American identities, the history of Asians in America, and the Asian American Movement. Then, we will use this knowledge to study a broad range of contemporary campaigns such as workers’ and immigrant rights, LGBTQ rights, environmental justice, and educational and socioeconomic disparities. We will also explore how Asian Americans have organized together across cultures to build solidarity and fight for justice. By exploring this spectrum, we will examine our own commonalities with these issues, regardless of our ethnic or cultural background. We will also explore these topics through different avenues of activism—art, community organizing, health services, and more—and learn the many ways we can take action. Over a span of seven days, we will be visiting Asian American community members and organizations in the Bay Area and Los Angeles, investigating how today’s activism is taking shape. Our trip includes service opportunities, historical tours, question and answer sessions with prominent Asian American activists, and more. We’ll work alongside other Stanford activists, grassroots non-profit organizations, and our activist elders. Ultimately, this trip aims to promote public service approaches to addressing inequities amongst social groups within the Asian American diaspora, other minority groups, and American society at large.

Application Link: 
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hello, I’m Joshua Pe (he/him/his), I’m from Lexington, Kentucky, and I’m a sophomore, prospective Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. I went on the Asian American Issues trip this past spring as a participant, because a lot of the upperclassmen who I looked up to went on the trip and/or led the trip in the past, and they told me about how great of an experience it was. In the class, I learned a lot about my identity being Southeast Asian, and I was able to reflect on how this identity affected my life and also the lives of the Asian American community. I spent this past summer working at the Asian Prisoner Support Committee (one of the orgs we visited on the trip), and it was a transformative and empowering experience, being able to work with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people towards liberation. I’m excited to be teaching the class and leading the trip this year, and sharing this experience + learning from your experiences too! Contact me at joshuape@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Hello, this is Melody Yang (they/them). I’m a rising junior from Queens, NY, majoring in Engineering Physics. I participated in the trip during my first year because I wanted to learn about the connections between Asian American identity and activism, and because many upperclassmen encouraged me to go. I’m excited to be leading it this year. Other ways I have been involved in the Asian American community include: working at the Asian American Activities Center (A3C) as a frosh intern and Asian American Studies Liaison, living in Okada as a preassign, and joining the Asian American Students’ Association and the Stanford Asian American Activism Committee.The summer after my 1st year, I participated in Seeding Change, an Asian American grassroots organizing fellowship, and worked at the Chinese Progressive Association, where I helped support low-income workers and tenants living in SF Chinatown. I have also been loosely involved with the API Equality – Northern California. The organizing communities at Stanford and in the Bay have been incredibly important to me these past two years, and I look forward to sharing them with you. Contact me at myang10@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Capital or Community: Housing Inequality in the Bay Area

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Capital or Community: Housing Inequality in the Bay Area
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

How has housing policy played a role in the marginalization of various groups in the United States? How have tech companies played a role in the housing crisis in the Bay Area? What factors contribute to the current housing crisis in the Bay Area? What is the role of Stanford and Stanford students in contributing to and addressing the housing crisis? This one unit course aims to explore ideas about housing inequality as they intersect with marginalized groups in the Bay Area, including immigrants, people of color, and the LGBTQ community. We will meet with various individuals and organizations working to address housing issues in the Bay Area, from researchers to community organizers to policy makers. Along with learning from and about the various actors in housing inequality in the Bay Area, we will take time to engage with our community organizations based on their needs and our capacity during the trip. We will begin the class by looking at the history of urban planning and housing policy in various cities to study the enduring, marginalizing effects of housing policy. Then we’ll look at the impact of large tech companies on their host cities before focusing on the unique features of the Bay Area’s housing crisis. Lastly, we’ll look at how various community organizations are addressing these issues. By the end of this course, students will have an understanding of the intersections that come with housing rights issues, especially as it relates to the Bay Area. The course is open to all students from all backgrounds and interests. Students do not need to have any kind of particular disciplinary training or specific knowledge about housing or the social landscape of different marginalized groups in order to partake in the class and the trip.

Trip Flyer: 
Application Link: 

Watch this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYNuR1oaQts) - What was your reaction to the video? For example, was anything surprising or unsurprising to you? What questions or thoughts do you have after watching this video?

Trip Leaders
Biography:
Evander Deocariza: Evander (he/him) is a junior majoring in Computer Science and minoring in Ethics in Society. He transferred to Stanford last year from San Diego Mesa College. Prior to that, Evan served as a cryptologic linguist in the U.S. Marine Corps. When not busy with schoolwork, Evan spends most of his time at home with his husband (Brendan) and their cat (Journey). He participated in the Housing Inequality ASB last spring and found the experience so transformative that he decided to co-lead the trip this year. Evan hopes to foster an empathetic and nuanced understanding of a complex issue, and build a tight sense of community through this trip. Contact him at evandeo@stanford.edu
Biography:
Emily Honda Lemmerman: Emily (she / her) is a senior majoring in Sociology, with a minor in African & African-American Studies. Emily grew up in Tokyo, Japan, and is interested in pursuing public interest law. You can find her either reading a book, or cooking in Synergy house on campus, where she lives. She took part in the Domestic Workers Rights’ ASB last spring, and is co-leading this ASB on housing rights as a way of fostering a similarly thought-provoking experience for students looking to engage deeply with an issue that is always present in the Bay Area - the housing crisis. Contact her at eglem@stanford.edu with good animal content, questions about the trip, or just to hang out!

ASB 2019-2020 - Capital or Community? Housing Inequality in the Bay Area

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Capital or Community? Housing Inequality in the Bay Area
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

What, exactly, do people mean when they talk about the “housing crisis”? What does this look like here in the Bay Area, and how does this crisis impact the people who call this place home? How has government housing policy, from the local to the national level, helped contribute to the marginalization of various groups? What is gentrification and how does it relate to displacement? What is the role of Stanford and Stanford students in contributing to and addressing this crisis? This one unit course aims to explore these questions and more in an attempt to understand the complex and ongoing process of housing inequality in Stanford’s own backyard. We will specifically look at the Bay Area and how housing inequality intersects with the experience of marginalized groups, including immigrants, people of color, and the LGBTQ community.  With a focus on the Bay Area and Stanford’s place in this, we will begin by looking at the anatomy of the current housing crisis and present-day discussions. Next, we will explore the historical processes that brought us here, including the legacy of urban planning, the influence of wealth and development, and the far-reaching impacts of racial segregation. Following this, we will explore the role that business interests in the Bay have played in exacerbating this crisis - with a specific focus on the tech industry. Finally, we will trace the impact that Stanford and Stanford students have, as well as potential solutions and means of resisting the worst effects of housing inequality. By the end of this course, students will have an understanding of both the complex history of housing in the Bay Area and the intersection of housing rights with other contemporary struggles. The course is open to all students from all backgrounds and interests. Students do not need to have any kind of particular disciplinary training or specific knowledge about housing or the social landscape of different marginalized groups in order to partake in the class and the trip.

Application Link: 
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hello! I’m (they/them) a senior in Urban Studies doing the Urban Society and Social Change concentration, and I am one of the peer advisers for this year! Originally from Houston, I’m an aspiring urban planner and hope to work in affordable housing in the Bay Area or NYC. I'm passionate about cities, gentrification, and the relationship between government and communities. I’ve been involved with SCoPE 2035 during my time at Stanford and am currently writing a thesis on tenant relocation assistance. Contact me at kham101@stanford.edu.
Biography:
I’m (he/him) a Los Angeles native who has been away from Southern California for far too long. I’m a senior majoring in Urban Studies and pursuing a coterminal MA in Public Policy. My concentration in Urban Studies is Urban Society and Social Change, and I’m one of the program’s peer advisers for the year! My current focus is urban data science, and understanding the interactions between people and policy in the built environment. I’m also interested in understanding how social movements develop, which is the focus of my senior capstone on public banks, and have been involved in SCoPE 2035 for the last 2 years. Among my many other hats includes being Co-General Manager at KZSU and Community Manager at Synergy. Contact me at mnissen1@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Cherokee Language Revitalization

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Cherokee Language Revitalization
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Calling all writers, illustrators, and people interested in indigenous language revitalization!  For the past 500 years, indigenous people have been fighting Western colonization. Language suppression has been a key component of the colonial agenda. From literature and research that sought to establish  indigenous languages as inferior to European ones to state-run boarding schools which forbade indigenous children from speaking their mother tongue in order to “kill the Indian, save the man,” indigenous languages have endured centuries of racist slander and violence. Because of historic language suppression by the United States and other harsh facts of colonization, the extinction of many indigenous languages is generations away. In many tribes, there are only a couple thousand fluent speakers left and the vast majority of these speakers are elders. In this class we will be learning about Cherokee language revitalization efforts and creating children’s books to be used in the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian’s immersion school, the New Kituwah Academy. Class topics include: basic Cherokee language lessons, Cherokee history and culture, technological language revitalization efforts, how to write and illustrate children’s books, and more!  During the spring break trip, we will present our children’s books to the New Kituwah Academy, attend the annual Cherokee Language Symposium (hosted by Western Carolina University), spend a day of service outdoors, and engage with different community members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. 

Application Link: 
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hi there! I’m (he/him) a senior from Texas and enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation. I’ve been on this ASB trip twice: the first time I went, I was a sophomore and getting to visit and help out was a completely life-changing experience for me. Outside of classes here, I’m involved in the symphony orchestra and jazz orchestra as a timpanist/percussionist/drummer, Powwow as the program chair, STEAM as the director of technology, and I’m an avid hiker and unicyclist. Galieliha tsigowatesdi! Contact me at joshp007@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Siyo nigada! (Hi everyone!) I’m (any pronouns) an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and I grew up in Seattle. I’m the Cherokee Language One teaching assistant and am very passionate about language revitalization. I love to draw and write and am majoring in psychology. Contact me at rlam13@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - ChiRoots: The Origins of Activism in the City (Chicago, Illinois)

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
ChiRoots: The Origins of Activism in the City (Chicago, Illinois)
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Chicago is a lively city that houses a large diversity of communities, ideas, and voices — all of which make the windy city a cradle for radical change and new possibilities. Unfortunately, Chicago and its people go largely misrepresented as the city is frequently characterized by violence, crime, and instability through diverse media outlets. With representations such as those seen in “Shameless” and “Chi-Raq”, Chicago is reduced to a stereotype, and these images of Chicago give little credit to the many activists making major changes at the grassroots level to benefit both local and global communities. In this class, we will delve into specific issues affecting Chicago and learn about their corresponding grassroot organization. Some issues that we will address are social justice, education, immigration, environmental racism, violence, cultural humility, segregation, and gentrification, among others. Through readings, discussions, and group activities, we aim at cultivating knowledge, empathy, humility, and consideration for how we can best engage with community members and leaders on our trip. Given our focus on Chicago, we will develop a deep understanding of the different forms of activism and community organizing that exist and are prevalent in the city as we are immersed in the communities that are personally affected.  During the trip, students will learn from organizations we visit and how they are tackling issues presented in their communities. The trip will give students the opportunity to learn about embodied knowledge through dialogues from the organizations that will be visited and learn how to apply this type of knowledge back at Stanford and/or their affiliated communities. By the end of the trip, students will have a better understanding of styles of activism and community organizing, ultimately empowering them to develop their own approaches to certain issues they want to address.

Application Link: 
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hai c: My name is Crystal Llanos (pronouns she/hers), I was born and raised in Salem, Oregon, and I am a first generation and low-income (FLI) Latinx student. I am interested in studying bioengineering and hopefully use my degree to develop economical and accessible medical assistance to underrepresented minorities, but I am also interested in a variety of other majors (like Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Chicanx/Latinx Studies). While I was not born in Chicago, nor have I lived there, I had the opportunity to be apart of last years ASB (Unearthing Our Roots: Chicago Grassroots Movement). During that week alone, I grew in ways I didn’t think possible within that time frame. I especially grew in the context of understanding the city of Chicago, the cultures, histories, communities, and grassroots movements that exist within the city. I am excited to continue to learn even more this year about what makes the city of Chicago so powerful, starting with it’s most underrepresented communities. Contact me at cllanos@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Hey y'all! I am a sophomore from Chicago and Morelos, Mexico. Hailing from immigrant parents who encouraged my curiosity for the intersection between health and law, I am a potential Human Biology major with a minor in Human Rights. I was born and raised in Chicago and moved to Mexico when I was 9, only to later move back to Chicago to attend high school. My experience with living part of my life in Mexico and part of it in Chicago has given me the opportunity to evaluate the different ways in which Chicago is portrayed in popular media and the extent to which those depictions are true. It has also helped me gain a deeper appreciation for the cultural richness, community engagement, and grassroots movements that exist in the city. So, I'm really excited to have conversations about Chicago's diverse neighborhoods, the pressing issues they face, and the powerful grassroots movements and community organizers that are helping Chicago's most vulnerable communities. Contact me at nsegura2@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Design Thinking for Social Innovation: Japan and Stanford Exchange

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Design Thinking for Social Innovation: Japan and Stanford Exchange
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
6
Trip Description: 

Design thinking has experienced a recent increase in popularity at Stanford and on a global scale. Social innovators and educators in both the US and Japan are asking how design thinking can reach its potential to create positive impact. This spring break, we will use design thinking to examine sustainability issues that especially affect urban areas (such as housing, climate change, food systems, waste, etc.) and work in cross-cultural teams to produce new insights and improvements. This will take the form of interviews, observations, group discussions, and partnerships with local organizations. In collaboration with VIA’s Social Innovation Program, 20 college students from Japan who are interested in social change will be joining us for a hands-on project experience addressing current challenges and opportunities in urban sustainability. Stanford students will facilitate discussions on urban issues and culture, as well as participate in organization visits in the Bay Area, offering the unique opportunity to hear from different perspectives, exchange ideas, and learn from each other across cultures. If you are interested in creating inclusive spaces for people of all cultures to discuss design thinking and urban sustainability, apply today! We look forward to hearing from you!

Trip Flyer: 
Application Link: 

Urban sustainability can include the social, cultural, economic, and/or environmental aspects of a community. How do these aspects play a role in a sustainability issue you’ve observed in a community that is important to you?

Trip Leaders
Biography:
Cristina Ammon: Hello everyone! My name is Cristina (she/her), and I am currently a junior majoring in Urban Studies with a minor in East Asian Studies. On campus, I’m part of the FLI, LSP, and Latinx communities. I’m passionate about international exchange and designing spaces for marginalized communities. I participated in this ASB last year, and it taught me how to apply design-thinking to issues I really care about. This trip also introduced me to lifelong friends, new passions, and many wonderful opportunities. I hope ASB will be a similarly rewarding time for the next cohort of participants as we engage in cross-cultural exchange, design-thinking, and exploration of the Bay Area! You can contact me at cammon@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Stefanie Ky: Hello! My name is Stefanie (she/her/hers) & I am a senior studying Psychology and minoring in Data Science. I love meeting new people, exploring new places, and experiencing different cultures, so I am excited to be returning as one of the trip leaders with Cristina this year (I was a participant on this trip in spring 2017)! I also like cute cafes, taking naps & taking walks, looking at the stars, and (online) window shopping. On campus, I am involved in the Asian-American & FLI (first-generation and/or low-income) communities, and I work as a student staff member at the FLI Office. You can contact me at sky3@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Energy Challenge: Exploring Climate Change & Global Development

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Energy Challenge: Exploring Climate Change & Global Development
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

We are faced with the challenge of decarbonizing the global economy in 10 years, while expanding basic energy access to a billion people. Through our Winter course and trip to Washington DC, we will explore the conflicts and nuances of reconciling future development and climate policies.  Our plan is to tie together the study of the future of energy and resource use with the dynamics of development from multiple perspectives. In our class, we will study the building blocks for both sustainable energy and for effective growth from the country perspective. We will question prevailing models and meet with environmental policy and global development think tanks, activists, policymakers and representatives of developing countries. 

Application Link: 
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hi! I’m a Senior and Marylander. I came to Stanford expecting to study philosophy, but am now an Electrical Engineering major, focusing on renewable energy and math (go figure). I’ve gotten to see energy policy from the inside through working at a Chinese wind company and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. I’m excited to be back in DC and help more people see the connections between energy and the way our world works. I love to read (our library system is the most underrated resource on campus) and try to ride my longboard without falling. Sarah and I lived in the same frosh dorm (Roble!). Contact me at nramesh@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Hi! I am a Senior studying Political Science and minoring in Economics and Spanish. In my classes and internships I had struggled with how the world of global development seemed to ignore the huge threat to human wellbeing that is Climate Change. This ASB is the opportunity to bring together policy (me) and climate/energy (Raja) to explore how to build a better future. Aside from questioning everything I believe in, I enjoy baking cookies, giving people cookies, listening to podcasts, and promoting women’s involvement in politics (go SWIP!). Contact me at sarahmg@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Farmworker Health in California: The Fields, (Im)Migration, and Resistance

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Farmworker Health in California: The Fields, (Im)Migration, and Resistance
Air Travel Trip: 
No
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

California boasts one of the U.S.’ biggest agricultural industries, which requires a large, steady labor force—especially during harvest seasons. Much of the produce in our dining halls comes from various farms across California, harvested by historically--and currently--marginalized groups that live in underserved communities across rural California. Despite playing such an integral part in this country’s well-being, farmworkers often face entrenched obstacles to securing their own physical and mental well-being. In this Alternative Spring Break Course, we will analyze the social, economic, and political conditions affecting farmworker health, and identify how the healthcare system can better serve them, especially migrant farmworkers. We will visit the Salinas and San Joaquin Valleys in Central and Northern California for a first-hand perspective on migrant farmworker health and its complexities. We will understand how the US’s immigration policies and the agricultural industry in California have played a role in shaping the social determinants of health for farmworkers statewide. We will study the common health issues, healthcare interventions, and related immigration and health policies affecting farmworker communities. Furthermore, we aim to study avenues for change, ranging from policy to activism, that farmworkers and allies have historically taken to address their health care needs and the injustices facing their communities. During our ASB trip, we will meet with farmworkers themselves, and various organizations working with them. These organizations include healthcare providers, policy makers, community advocates, and farm owners. As we learn, we will challenge our perspectives and knowledge of the agriculture industry, migrant farmworkers, healthcare for underserved communities, and ethical service. Recognizing that the issues and obstacles that farmworkers face are largely systemic and deeply rooted in history is key to gaining a deeper understanding of these injustices. The aim of this course is to broaden our understanding of farmworker health in California, and discover ways through which this knowledge can open additional avenues to change.

Application Link: 
Trip Leaders
Biography:
Hello! I’m a junior from Alameda, CA, and I’m majoring in Human Biology (Immunology and Child Public Health) and minoring in Creative Writing on the poetry track. If there’s one thing that ties all of my interests together, it’s lifting up marginalized communities and giving them back a voice that’s been silenced and disenfranchised. As a FLI student, I seek ways to support underprivileged communities and voice the marginalized identity. Whether that’s working with kids with special needs in the community, tutoring and mentoring kids in Oakland and East Palo Alto, or writing poetry that increases visibility of injustice, I’m working towards confronting power systems that are set up against those who feel powerless. Well, we’re taking that power back. I’m extremely excited to be leading this trip with Nate and learning with you guys how we can uplift the (im)migrant farmworker community in California and in the US in general. Contact me at julagu3@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Hey! I’m a junior from Watsonville, CA, majoring in Environmental Systems Engineering, with a focus on energy and water, and minoring in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Growing up in an inequitable agricultural community, I’ve personally seen environmental and racial issues as deeply intertwined. I’ve worked in research labs for much of undergrad, first researching microbial pollution, and now I do desalination research. I’m also the External Community Chair in Students for a Sustainable Stanford, and a member of Students for Environmental Racial Justice. I worked at the Environmental Justice Coalition for Water in Watsonville last summer, working on projects to improve access to safe drinking water in rural Monterey County. I also went on this ASB with my co-lead Julian last year, had a wonderful time, and I hope to improve the trip however possible! There’s much to learn and grapple with, and I’m excited to start that process with y’all. Contact me at natram3@stanford.edu.

ASB 2019-2020 - Just Corn and Cows? Bridging the Rural-Urban Divide

Basic Information
Application Process: 
Trip Name: 
Just Corn and Cows? Bridging the Rural-Urban Divide
Air Travel Trip: 
This trip will travel by air.
Number of Participants: 
12
Trip Description: 

Rural America occupies 97% of US land and contains 19% of the country’s population, but until the 2016 election, many Americans were unfamiliar with the struggles and successes of this sector of the country. While tempting to reduce it to an opioid-laden land of Trump supporters, rural America includes the 2018 US News “Best State to Live In” (Iowa), yet 23 million of its citizens are still left without broadband Internet access, opening the door to opportunities for development and implementation of technology. A trip to the rural Midwest and accompanying one-unit course will offer students the opportunity to learn about important issues in rural America such as agriculture, educational disparities, economic hardship, and political frustration. We will meet with local political leaders, agriculturalists, and fellow students to broaden our understanding of the region and experience America’s shared humanity. A critical component of a Stanford education is the opportunity to benefit from the diversity of our surroundings. Through this trip, we hope to provide Stanford students with a learning experience they otherwise may not encounter. It promises to be a truly unprecedented chance for future policymakers, computer scientists, business owners, and other leaders to engage in constructive dialogue and brainstorm solutions for tackling challenges to America’s future, thus parrying social media’s filter-bubbles and echo-chambers.

Trip Flyer: 
Application Link: 

What is your experience with the rural-urban divide and why do you think studying it is important? (300 words)

Trip Leaders
Biography:
Andrew Dallakoti: Andrew (he/him) is a junior majoring in Economics and Mathematics. He previously served as the Director of Technology of Stanford in Government and is currently a research assistant under Hoover Fellow Eric Hanushek. And although he also attended the Hoover Institution Summer Policy Boot Camp and studied at Oxford, he is, in fact, not the same person as his co-lead Gabi. Rather, Andrew was born and raised in the great state of Nebraska before moving to Denver, CO. In Colorado he interned for the political think tank The Centennial Institute in 2014 where he developed advanced polling structures to model the 2016 election, presenting his findings at the Western Conservative Summit. The following year, he utilized this geo-coding technology as an intern for Tiny Hands International, an organization in Kathmandu striving to mitigate human trafficking across the Nepal-India border. He then earned a Haas Center fellowship to work for ELPASO, a nonprofit aiming to close the educational achievement gap among Latinx students in Boulder, Colorado. And last summer, he interned for US Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE). Andrew enjoys discussing public policy, playing tennis, and debating as a member of Stanford Debate Society. Through this ASB, he hopes to reconcile his experiences in rural Nebraska and suburban Colorado. He still does not feel qualified to lead this class, but is looking forward to learning from the experiences of fellow group members. You can contact him at andrewd3@stanford.edu.
Biography:
Gabrielle Torrance: Gabrielle (she/her) is a junior majoring in Public Policy and minoring in Economics. She grew up near Media, Illinois, where she and her family own and operate a corn and soybean farm and raise approximately 125 Hereford cattle. She was involved in 4-H for ten years, and from 2017-18 she served as president of the Illinois Junior Hereford Association, through which she has showed cattle for the past 12 years. She attended the Hoover Institution Summer Policy Boot Camp in August 2017, studied education policy in Oxford during spring 2018, and spent summer 2018 in Washington, DC working at a consulting firm on issues ranging from poverty and inequality to tech policy. Through this ASB, she looks forward to bridging her two worlds and having important conversations on bridging the sociopolitical divides in America. She feels very fortunate to be leading this experience and looks forward to the group’s many discussions! You can contact her at torran20@stanford.edu.