People

Director of ERRG


Professor M. Elisabeth Pate-Cornell

Professor Paté-Cornell’s specialty is engineering risk analysis with application to complex systems (space, medical etc.). Her research has focused on explicit inclusion of human and organizational factors in the analysis of systems’ failure risks. Her recent work is on the use of game theory in risk analysis with applications that have included counter-terrorism and nuclear counter-proliferation problems.

She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the French Academie des Technologies and of several boards including Aerospace, Draper Laboratory and InQtel. Dr. Paté-Cornell was a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board from December 2001 to 2008. She holds an Engineering degree (Applied Math/CS) from the Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, an MS in Operations Research, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems, both from Stanford University.


 

Current Doctoral Students

 

Marshall Kuypers

Marshall Kuypers is a predoctoral science fellow at CISAC. He is a PhD candidate in Management Science and Engineering at Stanford University, concentrating in Risk Analysis. Marshall studies quantitative models for cyber security in organizations. He is interested in developing probabilistic modeling techniques to improve decision making regarding defense against cyber threats.

Marshall has a diverse background spanning many fields, that includes modeling cyber security for the Jet Propulsion Lab, developing trading algorithms with a high frequency trading company, researching superconducting materials at UIUC, and modeling economic and healthcare systems with the Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) engineering group at Sandia National Labs. Marshall is also the Co-President of the Stanford Complexity Group.


 

Matt Smith

Matt’s research interests are in Bayesian methods, probabilistic risk analysis, and decision analysis.  His work focuses on the application of these techniques to modeling the vulnerability, reliability, and resilience of critical infrastructure networks and explores how to minimize the economic impacts of disruptive events.  Matt’s current research aims to enable national-level decision makers from the public and private sector to better assess and quantify cybersecurity risks in the national power grid in support of a more robust risk management framework.

Matt is a US Army Operations Research/Systems Analysis Officer who has served in a variety of assignments in the Army’s Intelligence and Research and Development communities.  Most recently, he served as commander for Alpha Company, 741st Military Intelligence Battalion.  He holds a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from USC, and a B.S. in Physics from MIT.


 

Jason Reinhardt

Jason Reinhardt is a national security systems analyst, and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Risk Analysis, focusing on nuclear weapons arsenal management. Specifically, he is developing quantitative risk models to examine the trade-offs faced by nuclear armed nations in the process of disarmament. He is also pursuing research aimed at modeling and quantifying the catastrophic risks posed by near earth asteroid encounters. Other research interests include game theoretic applications to risk analysis and management, as well as adversary models.

Jason holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Purdue School of Electrical Engineering at Indianapolis, and a M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. Currently, he is the MacArthur Nuclear Security Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation.


 

Gregory Heon

Gregory’s research focuses on the strategic acceleration and deceleration of tempo in games against intelligent adversaries. He is currently looking into a variety of cases, including end-of-game tempo manipulation in sports, the utilization of time in negotiations (both theory and practice), and the strategic use of deadlines and delays in the Cuban missile crisis. Gregory is particularly interested in exploring the intersection of risk analysis and game theory.

Prior to starting his doctoral work, Gregory was an undergraduate at Stanford University studying Financial and Decision Engineering in the Department of Management Science and Engineering. Professionally, he has worked briefly in the distressed debt hedge fund space and as a freelance software developer.


 

Philip Keller

Philip’s research interests include applications of stochastic game theory to systems design; modeling intelligent and adaptive adversaries; and applying engineering risk methods to national security policy decisions. Currently, he is focused on improving methods for incorporating uncertainty about adversary objectives into decision models. Philip is a National Defense Science and Engineering Fellow.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Philip served as an analyst at the Homeland Security Studies and Analysis Institute, a Department of Homeland Security federally funded research and development center; and as a consultant for the Department of Defense. His professional experience includes research on unmanned aircraft operations and sensors; natural disaster risk modeling; terrorism; and military force structure. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics, and a Master’s in Defense and Strategic Studies.


Past Students

Matt Daniels

Matt Daniels

David Blum

David Blum

David Caswell

David Caswell

 

Paul Kucik

Paul Kucik

Russ Garber

Russ Garber

Jimmy Benjamin

Jimmy Benjamin

 

John Chachere

John Chachere

Lea Deleris

Lea Deleris

Seth Guikema

Seth Guikema

 

Marc Sachon

Marc Sachon

Robin Dillon-Merrill

Robin Dillon-Merrill