Stanford Institute for Theoretical Economics

Summer 2013 Workshop

 

 

 

Segment 1: Governance and Development

June 20 and 21, 2013.

Organized by Frederico Finan, University of California, Berkeley; Jonathan Robinson, University of California, Santa Cruz and Pascaline Dupas, Stanford University.

 

Segment 2: The Macroeconomics of Uncertainty and Volatility

June 24, 25 and 26, 2013.

Organized by Jesus Fernandez-Villaverde, University of Pennsylvania and Nick Bloom, Stanford University.

 

Segment 3: Empirical Implementation of Theoretical Models of Strategic Interaction and Dynamic Behavior

July 8, 9 and 10, 2013.

Organized by Jeremy Fox, University of Michigan and Frank Wolak, Stanford University.

 

Segment 4: Dynamic Games, Contracts, and Markets

July 29, 30 and 31, 2013.

Organized by Yuliy Sannikov, Princeton University; Simon Board, University of California, Los Angeles; Andrzej Skrzypacz, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University and Alexander Wolitzky, Pablo Kurlat, Florian Scheuer, all Department of Economics, Stanford University.

 

Segment 5: New Models of Financial Markets

August 5, 6 and 7, 2013.

Organized by Lars Peter Hansen, University of Chicago; Jules van Binsbergen and Peter Koudijs, both Graduate School of Business, Stanford University; and Monika Piazzesi and Martin Schneider, both Department of Economics, Stanford University.

 

Segment 6: Advances in Environmental and Energy Economics

August 12 and 13, 2013.

Organized by Arik Levinson, Georgetown University, and Larry Goulder and Matt Harding, both Stanford University.

 

Segment 7: Experimental Economics

August 23, 24 and 25, 2013.

Organized by Lise Vesterlund, University of Pittsburgh and Lucas Coffman, The Ohio State University; John Beshears, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, and Charles Sprenger, Alvin Roth and Muriel Niederle, all Stanford University.

 

Segment 8: Psychology and Economics 11.0

August 26, 27 and 28, 2013.

Organized by Vincent Crawford, University of Oxford and University of California, San Diego; David Laibson, Harvard University; Ulrike Malmendier, University of California, Berkeley; John Beshears, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University and B. Douglas Bernheim, Economics Department, Stanford University.

 

 
     
SITE is funded by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR). SITE receives additional financial support from the Department of Economics at Stanford University, which also houses its offices.