Stanford Institute for Theoretical Economics (SITE) 
Announces its 2005 Summer Workshop 
July 7 - August 27, 2005

SITE's workshop sessions are open to all who wish to attend. There is no registration procedure or fee charged for the workshop. All sessions are scheduled to take place in the Landau Economicsbuilding. If you need directions and/or information about parking, please follow this link http://www.stanford.edu/group/SITE/or contact SITE's administrator, Priscilla Williams, at the address listed below the announcement of this summer's topics.


CALL FOR PAPERS:  Application Procedure

The Stanford Institute for Theoretical Economics (SITE) is organizing a six-session conference on economic theory and applications.  We have a limited budget to help with travel costs.  We invite submissions, especially ones from junior theorists.  Junior theorists are defined by SITE as first or second year full-time faculty at educational institutions in the United States or Canada.  We also welcome submissions by more senior theorists.

Interested individuals who are working in the areas mentioned below - see list of six themes - can apply by sending an email with your paper attached as a PDF file (along with the title of the session that you want to join) to Ilya Segal in care of Priscilla Williams at priscilla.williams@stanford.edu.

The deadline for applications is March 15, 2005.  We expect to make selections by April 15th.
 

2005 SITE SUMMER WORKSHOP THEMES

  1. Dynamic Games and Contracts. This segment is organized by Ivan Werning of the Department of Economics at MIT, Susan Athey and Narayana Kocherlakota of the Department of Economics at Stanford University and Manuel Amador, Peter DeMarzo, and Andy Skrzypacz of the Graduate School of Business at Stanford. The segment will take place from July 7 – July 9. This session will focus on theoretical models of dynamic settings with asymmetric information. Examples of dynamic games include models of trade, collusion, mutual insurance, public good provision, and policy games, particularly games where asymmetric information (hidden actions or hidden information) play a role.  Examples of contracting settings include dynamic models of risk sharing, unemployment insurance, taxation, price discrimination, corporate finance, buyer-supplier relationships, and labor contracts.

  2. Empirical Approaches to Policy Analysis.  This segment is organized by David Card of the Department of Economics at the University of California at Berkeley and Frank Wolak of the Department of Economics at Stanford University and will take place from July 12 - July 15 . There is a growing methodological divide between the approaches typically used for policy evaluation in labor economics and those typically used by
    researchers in industrial organization.  Though there are many important exceptions, the treatment effects approach appears to be the dominant paradigm for policy evaluation in the labor economics, while structural econometric modeling is the dominant paradigm in industrial organization. The goal of this workshop is to bring together scholars employing both approaches to discuss their work in order to improve the mutual understanding of both approaches by both sets of empirical researchers.

  3. Public and Private Sector Contracting. This segment is organized by Luis Garicano, University of Chicago GSB, and Jon Levin and Steve Tadelis of the Department of Economics at Stanford University and will take place from August 15 - August 17. This session will focus on the application of contract theory and organizational economics to contracting problems in the public and private sector. Possible topics include, but are not restricted to: public and private sector procurement, contracting in regulated industries such as health care or utilities, bureaucracy and incentives in government.

  4. Psychology and Economics 5.0. This segment is organized by B. Douglas Bernheim and Antonio Rangel of the Department of Economics at Stanford University,  David Laibson of the Department of Economics at Harvard University and Ulrike Malmendeir of the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and will take place from August 7 to August 9 . The field of "psychology and economics" is centered around the desire to open the “black-box” of decision making and take into account variables like emotions and culture that have been established as important elements of human decision making in other fields. To do this, “behavioral economics” brings insights from psychology, anthropology, neurobiology, neuroscience, and sociology into traditional economic problems, and explores their implications. A wide range of methodologies are used in the field and will be represented in the week: economics modeling, economic experiments, neuro-imaging, empirical work, and field work.

  5. The Nexus between Household Economics and the Macro Economy. This segment is organized by Jeremy Greenwood, University of Rochester, Narayana Kocherlakota , Michele Tertilt, and Mark Wright of the Department of Economics at Stanford University and will take place from August 11 - August 13. This session will focus on the role that households – and the interaction between household members – play in determining aggregate outcomes. This includes, but is not limited to, issues related to fertility, female labor supply, home production, health, human capital investment, household formation, and retirement. We especially invite submissions that analyze the role of families and households in economic development.

  6. Experimental Economics. This segment is organized by Muriel Niederle of the Department of Economics at Stanford University and Lise Vesterlund of the Department of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh and will take place from August 25 - August 27. This session is devoted to papers that use experiments.  We consider experiments that test theories, experiments that try to explore social issues, and experiments that show the importance of psychological phenomena.  We welcome field experiments as well as regular lab experiments.
     


Stanford Institute for Theoretical Economics (SITE)
579 Serra Mall at Galvez Street
StanfordUniversity
Stanford,California 94305-6072
Tel: (650)723-2218; Fax: (650) 725-5702
E-Mail: site@econ.stanford.edu

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