About Us

Contact Info

You can contact us at: GenAnthropocene@gmail.com
Follow us on Twitter: @GenAnthropocene
Like us on Facebook: GenerationAnthropocene
Find us on Stitcher Radio & iTunes

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Mission Statement

History is accelerating.  Global population has crossed seven billion, the planet’s temperature continues its abrupt rise, and scientists warn we are in the midst of a new mass extinction.  Transformations this enormous are rare in earth’s 4.6 billion year history and humankind’s planetary impact is geologic in scale.  We have caused a new geologic age, and it has a name: The Anthropocene.

In addition to our extensive physical and chemical influences on our planet, the Anthropocene has come to symbolize a cultural shift.  The concept has spread from academic circles to popular media and we at Generation Anthropocene want to cast our butterfly net as wide as possible to capture the conversations about this new age.  We seek out cross-generational stories from our changing environmental and cultural landscapes, discussing all things Anthropocene with thought-leaders like geologists and historians, ecologists and philosophers.  We’re grappling with our realization that we’re a geologic force and confronting the new reality with investigative storytelling.

We hope you enjoy the podcast and continue the story of our evolving planet with those around you.

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The Producers

Mike Osborne (creator, producer)
Mike Osborne recently completed his PhD, using stable isotope and trace metal geochemistry to analyze coral records from the western Pacific.  In particular, he is interested in decadal scale variability and dynamics in the El Niño/La Niña Southern Oscillation (ENSO) system.  His current fieldwork is done in the Republic of Palau and Easter Island.  In addition to his paleoclimate research, Mike has developed and taught science communication courses at Stanford.  These courses are project-based and generally focus on 21st century environmental issues.

Miles Traer (producer, creative director)
Miles Traer began his academic career at UC Berkeley with a double major in Geophysics and Art History.  He recently completed his PhD in the Tectonic Geomorphology Lab modeling the evolution of the seafloor.  Miles was first turned on to podcasts in 2007 and quickly became an avid consumer.  Some of his favorites include The BS Report, the StarTalk Radio podcast, In Our Time with Melvyn Bragg, The Nerdist, and WTF with Marc Maron.  In addition to his work as a scientist, Miles works as a part-time artist, contributing the art of this website including the portraits found on each interview’s page (drawn by hand).  When he’s not working on science or this podcast, you can generally find him cooking cajun gumbo.

Leslie Chang (producer)
Leslie Chang is a recent graduate of Stanford University, where she studied Earth Systems and creative writing. She has been a correspondent for Generation Anthropocene since the podcast’s earliest days, and fully joined the team after graduating in June 2012. In her spare time, she might be found camping, cooking, teaching piano, or enjoying a book with a mug of coffee. She is an avid fan of NPR, sea otters, SNL, free food samples, and anyone who posts interesting articles to Twitter. That could be you.

Thomas Hayden (executive producer)
Thomas Hayden is a lecturer in Stanford University’s Emmett-Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Energy, the School of Earth Sciences and the Graduate Program in Journalism. He has been an oceanographer, an associate editor at Newsweek, a senior writer at US News & World Report, and a freelance journalist for publications from National Geographic to Manure Matters. He teaches science and environmental journalism and communication, is co-editor of the forthcoming New Science Writer’s Handbook (April 2013, working title), and blogs about science, with friends, at The Last Word on Nothing.  Nothing makes him happier than seeing good students do great work.

Senior Correspondents

Maxine Luckett
Maxine Luckett is a junior majoring in Geology and Environmental Science and minoring in Energy Resource Engineering at Stanford University. Hailing from Colorado, Maxine has grown up amidst the mountains with a love of environment and spending time outside. Along with the environmental sciences, Luckett enjoys working in politics and policy, working on multiple campaigns and as a senate intern in her home state. Maxine is currently conducting research in Stanford’s Tectonic Geomorphology Laboratory.

Samantha Larson (former)
Samantha Larson recently received her master’s degree from Earth systems at Stanford, with specialized emphases in ocean sciences and environmental journalism. She also likes to spend as much of her time as possible playing in the mountains, climbing on granite walls, or diving under the sea.