The social justice of food

Agricultural ecologist Patrick Archie reflects on the social justice of food, the evolution of his profession, and his vision for community development as it relates to food systems.

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Contributor

Patrick Archie
Patrick Archie grew up in the South and made his way westward at the age of 18. After completing a BS in the College of Natural Resources at UC Berkeley, Patrick spent several years creating and managing urban agriculture projects in the San Francisco Bay Area, including one in Albany and another in Alameda.1 He also studied agroecology in a PhD program at UC Berkeley and completed the UC Santa Cruz program in Ecological Horticulture. Most recently, Patrick worked as a Lecturer and program director at Santa Clara University developing campus and community programs for the school’s Environmental Studies Institute. Patrick now serves as Stanford’s Farm Educator and is a Lecturer in the School of Earth Sciences.2 He teaches several classes at Stanford, including “Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture” and “Food Matters: Agriculture in Film.” He is also leading the development of the new Stanford Educational Farm.

Interviewer

Caroline Hodge
Caroline is a junior majoring in Philosophy & Religious Studies with a minor in Psychology. She is fascinated by how people conceptualize the relationship between humans and the environment, and is especially interested in the unique perspective sustainable agriculture provides on this relationship. Caroline spent a year between high school and college working on an organic vegetable farm in Connecticut, which introduced her to the world of sustainable food and agriculture. On campus, she is involved with the Stanford Farm Project and teaches environmental education to East Palo Alto sixth graders through the Eastside School for Field Studies at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.  She plans to write an Honors Thesis investigating the link between people’s views on nature and their environmentally responsible behavior.

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