The human cost of climate change

Expert on international law Andrew Guzman takes a step back from analyzing climate change in terms of degrees and meters of sea level rise and breaks down all the ways climate change will affect humanity.  Dr. Guzman offers this perspective through his new book, Overheated: The Human Cost of Climate Change.  From environmental refugees to changing disease vectors to social conflict, Guzman illustrates how nearly all of our human systems interact with climate and therefore will feel the effects of even +2C.

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Contributor

Andrew Guzman
Andrew Guzman is Professor of Law and Director of the Advanced Law degree Programs at Berkeley Law School, University of California, Berkeley. Professor Guzman holds a J.D. and Ph.D. (economics) from Harvard University. He has written extensively on international trade, international regulatory matters, foreign direct investment and public international law, and served as editor on the recently published Handbook of International Economic Law (Elgar Publishers) and authored How International Law Works (Oxford University Press). Professor Guzman is a member of the Institute for Transnational Arbitration’s Academic Council and is on the board of several academic journals. Professor Guzman has taught as a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, the University of Chicago Law School, the University of Virginia Law School, Vanderbilt Law School, the University of Hamburg, and the National University Law School in Bangalore, India.

Interviewer

Mike Osborne
Mike Osborne is currently a fifth year PhD student using stable isotope and trace metal geochemistry to analyze coral records from the western Pacific.  In particular, he is interested in decadal scale variability and dynamics in the El Niño/La Niña Southern Oscillation (ENSO) system.  His current fieldwork is done in the Republic of Palau and Easter Island.  In addition to his paleoclimate research, Mike has developed and taught science communication courses at Stanford.  These courses are project-based and generally focus on 21st century environmental issues.

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