Assessment
Assessing Goals I and II

To assess students' increased knowledge and understanding of culture and the connections between it's elements the site offers ways for students to self-assess and peer-assess, and for teachers to assess the students.

Assessment Examples

Forms of Assessment

 

Student Self-Assessment

Student Peer-Assessment

Teacher Assessment

Mural-Venture

  • Compare their answers to those on the site
  • Receive feedback and make comparisons with the interactive activities
  • Students assess each other's understanding as they explain to each other their understandings of their murals during the presentations
  • Students assess their work and that of the rest of the class when they communicate to put together the brochure.

Ben Linder Mystery

  • Through having to explain their understanding to another student, who would have read a different version of the story (from a different source) students are self-assessing their own understanding.
  • Through having to explain their understanding of the event (as an investigator of the press, photos, or of Ben Linder's diary) to another student who has examined the event using different evidence, they are self-assessing their own understanding.
  • In addition, students assess their understanding and that of the rest of the class when they communicate to put together the publication.
  • Teachers are provided with a list of questions students should be able to answer at the end of their investigation.
  • Teachers are also provided with suggested answers to these questions.

Nicaragua Quest

  • Through having to explain their perspective to another student, they are self-assessing their own understanding.
  • Students assess each other's understanding of the perspectives while role-playing.
  • Teachers are provided with a rubric to assess the report the group produces.

Garinagu
Migration

  • Students are asked to answer specific questions about the Garinagu migration.

Students can assess each other's learning through comparing their presentations

  • Teachers are provided with the answers to the questions presented.

Geography Map Puzzle

Students can self-assess and teachers can assess student comprehension of Central American geography through comparing the students' puzzle to the completed example.

Assessing Goal III
To assess students' increased cultural sensitivity and self-awareness the site suggests ways for both students to self-assess, and teachers to assess the students.

Assessment Examples

Forms of Assessment

 

Student Self-Assessment

Teacher Assessment

Ben Linder Mystery

  • Students could write personal reflections about the diary entries of Ben Linder in their own diaries. They should be try to answer the final study question "Imagine for a moment that you work with Ben at a co-op in Nicaragua. What would that experience be like?"
  • Teachers assess students' ability to put themselves inside the shoes of another when answering the final study question in the activity, "Imagine for a moment that you work with Ben at a co-op in Nicaragua. What would that experience be like?" Teachers should look for language use in order to measure levels of student empathy.

Nicaragua Quest

  • Students could write personal reflections about the personal interview they read with the teacher or the diary entries of the international worker.
  • Teachers assess students' ability to put themselves inside the shoes of another when role-playing.
  • Student ability to empathize will be measurable through language use during group discussions and in the completion of the final project.

Garinagu
Migration

  • Students reflect on their own migrations through creating a map. Students can assess their own understanding of the migration process as they research that of their families for the map and/or interview a local immigrant. Through having to explain to others their understanding, students must assess their own awareness.
  • Teachers can assess student understanding of the migration experience of the Garinagu through students explaining the migration of their own ancestors in their map projects. Teachers will look at how well students were able to identify with those who migrated or how well they reflected on their own migration if they themselves are immigrants.
  • Teachers can also assess the students' increased cultural sensitivity through class discussions about moving and change. To measure student cultural sensitivity, teachers can assess student use of language and class participation.

Mural-Venture

  • Students can reflect on what they learned about culture in a journal.
  • Students could write personal reflections about the personal interview they read with the Nicaraguan muralist, Julie Aguierre.
  • Teachers can look closely at the language students use to write a letter to a Nicaraguan.
  • Teachers can also measure this increased cultural sensitivity through comparing the language students initially used to describe the murals in their before and after the lesson in their initial explorations with their peers and finally their presentations to the class.