Areas of
Research
- The Shriram Center -
Molecular Bioengineering For Medicine & Biotechnology
Barron Lab at Stanford

Molecular Bioengineering For Medicine & Biotechnology

The Barron lab is designing, creating, and applying novel families of synthetic and biological polymers for application in medicine and biotechnology. Our integrated approach to creating new and useful biomimetics and bioconjugates involves molecular design, chemical and/or biological synthesis, physical characterization, and finally, rigorous in vitro and in vivo testing of the new oligomers or polymers for their intended medical or biotechnological use.

The work is highly interdisciplinary and collaborative, and variously intersects the domains of synthetic bioorganic chemistry, biophysics, protein mimicry or modification, polymer, biopolymer and hydrogel engineering, and finally the invention of new microscale bioseparations technologies. Common threads are polymer science and biological applications.

Professor Annelise Barron

The W.M. Keck Associate Professor of Bioengineering, and (by courtesy) Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering BS ChE University of Washington PhD ChE University of California, Berkeley

Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, 2002 DuPont Young Professor Award, 2002 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, 1999 Beckman Young Investigator Award, 1998
aebarron@stanford.edu

Recent Publications

Mooney JA, Pridgen EM, Manasherob R, Suh G, Blackwell HE, Barron AE, Bollyky PL, Goodman SB, Amanatullah DF, “Implant-associated bacterial biofilm and quorum sensing in periprosthetic joint infections,” Journal of Orthopaedic Research 2018. pdf reprint

Czyzewski AM, McCaig LM, Dohm MT, Broering LA, Yao L, Brown NJ, Didwania MK, Lin JS, Lewis JF, Veldhuizen R, Barron AE,“Effective in vivo treatment of acute lung injury with helical, amphipathic peptoid mimics of pulmonary surfactant proteins,” Scientific Reports 2018, 8, 6795. pdf reprint

Lee J, Kang D, Choi J, Huang W, Wadmanc M, Barron AE, Seo J, "Effect of side chain hydrophobicity and cationic charge on antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of helical peptoids," Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 28 (2018) 170–173. pdf reprint

Chongsiriwatana NP, Lin JS, Kapoor R, Wetzler M, Rea JAC, Didwania MK, Contag CH, Barron AE, “Intracellular biomass flocculation as a key mechanism of rapid bacterial killing by cationic, amphipathic antimicrobial peptides and peptoids,” Scientific Reports 2017, 7, 16718. pdf reprint

De Lorenzi E, Chiari M, Colombo R, Cretich M, Sola L, Vanna R, Gagni P, Bisceglia F, Morasso C, Lin JS, Lee M, McGeer PL, Barron AE, “Evidence that the Human Innate Immune Peptide LL-37 may be a Binding Partner of Amyloid-β and Inhibitor of Fibril Assembly,” Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease 2017, 59, 1213-1226. pdf reprint

Czyzewski AM, Jenssen H, Fjell CD, Waldbrook M, Chongsiriwatana NP, Yuen E, Hancock RE, Barron AE, “In Vivo, In Vitro, and In Silico Characterization of Peptoids as Antimicrobial Agents,” PLOS ONE 2016, 11, 1-17. pdf reprint

Lee M, Shi X, Barron AE, McGeer E, McGeer PL, “Human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 induces glial-mediated neuroinflammation,” Biochemical Pharmacology 2015; 94, 130-41. pdf reprint

Lee J, Huang W, Broering JM, Barron AE, Seo J, “Prostate tumor specific peptide-peptoid hybrid prodrugs,” Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters 2015, 25: 2849-2852. pdf reprint

Professor Annelise Barron

The W.M. Keck Associate Professor of Bioengineering, and (by courtesy) Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering BS ChE University of Washington PhD ChE University of California, Berkeley

Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, 2002 DuPont Young Professor Award, 2002 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, 1999 Beckman Young Investigator Award, 1998
aebarron@stanford.edu, C.V.