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Past Trainees


Joseph Tunner 1991-1992 - Chemical Engineering (Channing Robertson)
Dissertation: 1993: "ESCHERICHIA COLI: GROWTH CONTROL AND EFFECTS OF IMMOBILIZATION"
Current position: TBD

Jennifer Bahr 1991-1993 - Chemical Engineering (Charles Goochee; Channing Robertson)
Internship: Genentech (Summer 1992)
Dissertation: 1995: "FACTORS AFFECTING GLYCOSYLATION SITE OCCUPANCY OF ASN-184 OF TISSUE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR PRODUCED IN CHINESE HAMSTER OVARY CELLS (ASPARAGINE)"
Current position: Avigen

Dave Eschelbacher 1991-1993 - Chemistry (John Griffin)
Internship: Genentech (Summer 1992)
Current position: Columbia Medical School

Josh Salafsky 1991-1993 - Chemistry (Steven Boxer)
Dissertation: 1996: "ASSEMBLY AND MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC REACTION CENTERS AT SOLID INTERFACES"
Current position: Founder & CEO, Biodesy, LLC,Burlingame, CA

Michael Grimes 1992-1994 - Chemistry (Dale Drueckhammer)
Dissertation: 1998: "ELECTROENZYMATIC SYNTHESIS USING FLAVIN-CONTAINING ENZYMES (FLAVOENZYME, D AMINO ACID, OXIDATION)"
Current position: Dionex

Dana Andersen 1992-1994 - Chemical Engineering (Charles Goochee)
Internship: Genentech (Summer 1994)
Dissertation: 1995: "THE EFFECTS OF FACTORS IN THE CELL CULTURE ENVIRONMENT ON O-LINKED GLYCOSYLATION"
Postdoc: ETH Zurich
Current position: Genentech

Kurt Gish 1992-1994 - Biological Sciences (Charles Yanofsky)
Dissertation: 1994: "REGULATION OF THE TRYPTOPHANASE OPERON OF ESCHERICHIA COLI"
Current position: Eos Biotechnology, Inc.

Andrew Chow 1993 - Chemical Engineering (Channing Robertson)
Research: Investigation on a microscopic scale of the intermolecular forces that control the crystallization of proteins in two dimensional systems.

Michael Gramer 1993-1994 - Chemical Engineering (Charles Goochee)
Dissertation: 1994: "THE IMPACT OF EXTRACELLULAR GLYCOSIDASES ON THE OLIGOSACCHARIDE STRUCTURE OF CELL CULTURE-PRODUCED GLYCOPROTEINS"
Current position: Cellex Biosystems

Paula Rickert 1993-1995 - Chemistry (Steven Boxer)
Internship: DNAX (Autumn 1994)
Dissertation: 1998: "FUNCTIONAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CYCLIN C/CDK8 KINASE"
Postdoc: Dr. Henry Bourne at Department of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, UCSF
Current position: Senior Scientist at Incyte Genomics

Benjamin Schwartz 1993-1995 - Chemistry (Dale Drueckhammer)
Dissertation: 1997: "THE SYNTHESES OF ACETYL-COENZYME A ANALOGS AND THEIR USE IN ENZYMOLOGY (CLAISEN ENZYMES, THIOESTERS)"
Postdoc: Judith Klinman, UCSF
Current position: Glaxo Smith Kline

Christopher J. Buntel 1993-1995 - Chemistry (John Griffin)
Dissertation: 1996: "EFFORT TOWARDS THE MOLECULAR UNDERSTANDING OF OXIDOSQUALENE CYCLASE ENZYMES (STEROLS, TRITERPENES)"
Current position: Howry Simon Arnold & White, LLP

James Anderson 1994-1996 - Civil and Environmental Engineering (Perry McCarty)
Dissertation: 1996: "EFFECT OF CHLORINATED ETHENE BIODEGRADATION ON GROWTH RATES OF METHANOTROPHIC BACTERIA IN BIOFILMS AND MIXED CULTURES"
Current position: Ford Motor Company, Environmental Division

Michael Liang 1994-1996 - Chemistry (Harden McConnell)
Internship: Anergen (Autumn 1995)
Dissertation: 1997: "KINETIC AND STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF CLASS II MHC/PEPTIDE COMPLEXES (MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX, MYELIN BASIC PEPTIDE)"
Postdoc: George Whitesides, Harvard University
Current Position: Director of Composite Development at Cortek Inc.

William Mohler 1994-1995 - Molecular Pharmacology (Helen Blau)
Dissertation: 1997: "ANALYSIS OF MOUSE MYOBLAST FUSION (SYNCYTIA, BETA GALACTOSIDASE, CELL ADHESION MOLECULES)"
Postdoc: University of Wisconsin
Current position: Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut Health Center
(visit his web site at UConn Health Center) (Professor  Mohler's Website)

Maia Richardson 1994-1996 - Chemistry/Chemical Engineering (Dale Drueckhammer/Chaitan Khosla)
Internship: Kosan Biosystems (Autumn 1997)
Dissertation: 1998: "BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES ON RECOMBINANT 6-METHYLSALICYLIC ACID SYNTHASE (POLYKETIDE, PENICILLIUM PATULUM)"
Current position: Postdoc at UCSF

Laura Mazzola 1994-1996 - Chemistry/Chemical Engineering (Curtis Frank)
Internship: Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Japan. (Summer 1997)
Dissertation: 1999: "PROBING BIOMOLECULAR RECOGNITION USING ATOMIC FORCE MICROSCOPY (CHEMICAL FORCE MICROSCOPY, DNA HYBRIDIZATION, PROTEIN AFFINITY)"
Current position: Symyx

Hope Alisa Johnson 1994-1996 - Civil and Environmental Engineering (Alfred Spormann)
Internship: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (Summer 1997)
Dissertation: "A PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ANAEROBIC ETHYLBENZENE OXIDATION"
Current position: Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Postdoc Fellow, Lab. ofDr. Bradley Tebo

Michael Yatcilla 1995-1996 - Chemical Engineering (Alice Gast and Channing Robertson)
Internship: Xerox (Summer 1996)
Dissertation: 1998: "INFLUENCE OF PH ON TWO-DIMENSIONAL CRYSTALS OF STREPTAVIDIN (FREE ENERGY)"
Current position: Cyvex Neutraceuticals

Michael Conboy 1995-1997 - Biological Sciences (Martha Cyert)
Dissertation: 2000: "Studies of two yeast mutants which require calcineurin function, luv1 and alg11, with implications for calcineurin function in saccharomyces"
Current position: Graduate Student in Biological Sciences Department at Stanford University. 

Carlton Brooks 1995-1997 - Chemical Engineering (Gerry Fuller; Curtis Frank; Channing Robertson)
Internship: Caliper (Winter 1998)
Dissertation: 1999: "AN INTERFACIAL STRESS RHEOMETER TO STUDY THE SHEAR RHEOLOGY OF LANGMUIR MONOLAYERS"
Current position: Caliper

Patrick O'Brien 1995-1997 - Biochemistry (Daniel Herschlag)
Dissertation: 2000: "MECHANISM AND CATALYTIC PROMISCUITY OF E. COLI ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE"
Current position:

Robert Hu 1996-1998 - Chemistry (Steven Boxer)
Dissertation: "STRUCTURE-FUNCTION RELATIONSHIPS IN MYOGLOBINS WITH DISTAL AND PROXIMAL MUTATIONS"
Current position: McKinsey & Co.

Arthur Salomon 1996-1998 - Chemistry (John Griffin and Chaitan Khosla)
Dissertation: 2000: "CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY OF APOPTOLIDIN, AN INHIBITOR OF F0F1-ATPASE THAT SELECTIVELY INDUCES APOPTOSIS"

Grant M. Stevens 1996-1998 - Applied Physics (Norbert Pelc)
Internship: General Electric Medical Systems (Summer 1997)
Dissertation: 2000 :"VOLUMETRIC TOMOGRAPHIC IMAGING"
Current position:

Cindy Kreiger 1996-1998 - Civil Engineering (Martin Reinhard)
Dissertation: 2001 "BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ANAEROBIC OXIDATION OF m-XYLENE AND TOLUENE BY THE DENITRIFYING BACTERIUM, AZOARCUS SP. STRAIN T
Current position: Scientific Database Curator at SRI International

Robert Zawada 1997-1998 - Chemical Engineering (Chaitan Khosla)
Internship: Tularik (Summer 1999)
Dissertation: 1999: "IN VIVO AND IN VITRO ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED TYPE II POLYKETIDE SYNTHASES"
Current position: MelTech GmbH

Winnie Ahn 1997-1999 - Chemical Engineering (Channing Robertson)
Internship: SecuGen SA (Spring 1999)
Research: Examination of the structure of protein films on hyrdrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using AFM and STM.
Current Position: SecuGen SA 

Patrick Kampf 1997-1999 - Chemical Engineering (Curtis Frank)
Dissertation: "STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF POLY(BENZYL ETHER) MONODENDRON LANGMUIR FILMS"
Postdoc: Torrey Pines Institute

David Mai 1997-1998 - Chemical Engineering (Channing Robertson)
Internship: Hewlett Packard (Autumn 1997-Spring 1998)
Research: Study of the molecular recognition features of 6-deoxerythronolide B synthase (DEBS), a modular protein involved in the biosythetic pathway of erythromycin A.

Stuart Tsuji 1997-1998 - Chemical Engineering (Chaitan Khosla)
Dissertation: 2000: "ANALYSIS OF INTERMODULAR COMMUNICATION IN MODULAR POLYKETIDE SYNTHASES"
Current position: Stanford Medical School

Stephen Dudek 1998-1999 - Chemistry (Christopher Chidsey)
Internship: Maxygen (Summer 2000)
Dissertation: 2001: "SYNTHESIS OF TIOL-TERMINATED CONJUGATED OLIGOMERS FOR STUDY OF FAST INTERFACIAL ELECTRON TRANSFER"
Current Position: TBD

Jyllian Kemsley 1998-2000 - Chemistry (Edward Solomon)
Internship: Genencor International (Summer 2000)
Dissertation December, 2002: "INTERACTION OF NONHEME FERROUS ACTIVE SITES WITH SUBSTRATES: STRUCTURE/FUNCTION CORRELATIONS FOR PHENYLALANINE HYDROXYLASE AND BLEOMYCIN"
Current position: UCSC Science Writing Program, Santa Cruz Sentinel - News Reporter

George Pappas 1998-2000 - Mechanical Engineering (J. Drace/F. Zajak)
Internship: Omioma (Summer 2001)
Dissertation: 2001: "CHARACTERIZATION OF BICEPS BRACHII ARCHITECTURE AND CONTRACTION MECHANICS USING MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES"
Current position: pursuing MD/PhD at Stanford Medical School

Rosy Lee 1998-2000 - Mol. & Cell. Physiology (J. Nelson)
Internship: Biowire (Autumn 1999-Winter 2000)
Research: Examination of cytoskeletal interactions and how they affect the subcellar distribution of proteins.

Thomas Anderson 1998-2000 - Chemistry (Harden McConnell)
Dissertation: "KINETIC AND THERMODYNAMIC MODELS FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOMOLECULAR COMPLEXES"
Research: The chemical biophysics of biological membranes
Current Position: University of Basel- Biocenter, Postdoc in lab of Professor Joachim Seelig.

Caroline Ajo 1998-2000 - Chemistry (Steven Boxer)
Research: Development of the use of supported lipid bilayers as a model system to study the supramolecular organization of the bacterial photosynthetic membrane.
Current Position:Staff Scientist, Biological Nanostructures Facility,Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA

Arun Radhakrishnan 1998-2000 - Biophysics (Harden McConnell)
Internship: Cytion SA (Autumn 2002)
Dissertation: 2002: "CONDENSED COMPLEXES AND THE CHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF CHOLESTEROL IN MEMBRANES"
Current Position: TBD

Janice Lau 1998-2000 - Chemical Engineering (Chaitan Khosla)
Internship: Kosan Biosciences Inc. (Spring 2000)
Dissertation: 2000: "IN VIVO AND IN VITRO ANALYSES OF ACYLTRANSFERASE DOMAINS OF MODULAR POLYKETIDE SYNTHASES"
Current position: Kosan Biosciences Inc.

Cora Schmid 1999 - Biological Sciences (Virginia Walbot)
Research: Novel genes modifications in maize.

Blaine Pfeifer 1999-2001 - Chemical Engineering (Chaitan Khosla)
Internship: Kosan Biosciences Inc. (Spring 2001)
Dissertation: 2002: "METABOLIC ENGINEERING FOR COMPLEX NATURAL PRODUCT BIOSYNTHESIS UTILIZING Escherichia coli"
Current position: Post-Doctoral at M.I.T. with Professor Robert Langer

William Shen 1999-2001 - Chemical Engineering (Curtis Frank)
Research: Study the polymer-supported lipid membrane attached to a technologically relevant solid support. It serves as a simple model to study the biomembranes in nature. It is also a promising approach for the development of biosensors.

Laura Bartley 2000-2001 - Biochemistry (Daniel Herschlag)
Internship: Maxygen, Inc. (Summer 2002)
Dissertation: "INSIGHTS INTO RNA TERTIARY FOLDING: EXAMINATION OF STRUCTURE FORMATION BETWEEN THE P1 HELIX AND THE PRE-FOLDED TETRAHYMENA GROUP I RIBOZYME"
Current position: American Association for the Advancement of Science Science Policy Fellowship as a Risk Policy Fellow with the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Dennis Yancey 2000-2002 - Chemical Engineering (Channing Robertson and Jim Swartz)
Research: Genetically engineer Rhodococcus to markVI have a high specific activity for the selective oxidation of sulfur in middle distillate oil fractions.
Current Position:  Genencor, Internship

Thomas Wehrman 2000-2002 - Molecular Pharmacology (Helen Blau)
Research: Recently a technique to monitor protein-protein interactions was developed in Dr. Helen Blau's laboratory based on Jaco and Monod's complementation of the B- [Tom, this 'B' is a beta] -galactosidase enzyme. My search is focused on adapting this system to a mannalian two-hybrid screen. The envisioned screen would consist of a bait protein fused to one of the B-[beta]-gal mutants and a cDNA library fused to the other. Many of the inherent properties of the system afford unique advantages over more traditional screens for novel protein interactions.
Current Position:  Graduate Student in the Blau Group Lab.

Jennifer Schulte 2000-2002 - Chemical Engineering (Jim Swartz)
Internship: Genencor (Spring 2002)
Research: Study and optimize large scale in-vitro synthesis of RNA and acylated tRNAs Apply knowledge from transcrition to large-scale production of PCR based DNA. Supporting improvements to coupled transcription/translation Cell-Free protein synthesis.
Current Position:  Graduate Student in the Swartz Group Lab.

Caroline Uhlik 2000-2002 - Biochemistry (Patrick Brown)
Internship: Stanford Report (Summer 2003)
Research: I am interested in defining the relationship between the genotype and gene expression patterns in a simple model system.. We are using yeast as a model system to address this question. With techniques developed in this lab we were able to determine the parent of origin for each gene for a set of offspring . I have catalogued the expression profiles of the same individuals (using microarrays). This allows us to attribute gene expression levels to specific genotypes.
Current Position: TBD

Nicholas Wu 2000-2002 - Chemistry (Chaitan Khosla)
Internship: Kosan (Autumn 2001)
Dissertation: "Analysis of substrate channeling and substrate specificity in 6-deoxyerythronolide b synthase"
Current Position: TBD

Laurel Crosby 2000-2002 - Civil and Environmental Engineering (Craig Criddle)
Research: The primary objective of my research is to determine whether human-associate opportunistic bacteria are able to colonize greywater bioreactor communities. More specific goals for the research project are to determine whether invasion success correlates with the diversity of microbial species in a reactor community, and whether the amplitude of disturbance (magnitude of invasion) determines the outcome of the invasion trial.
Current Position: Research Assistant

Mike Jewett 2000-2002 - Chemical Engineering (Jim Swartz)
Internship: Genencor (Spring 2003)
Dissertation: 2004 "The Impact of Cytoplasmic Mimicry on Cell-Free Biology" 
Current Position: Post Doctoral - Center for Microbial Biotechnology - Technical University of Denmark.

Michael Liu 2001-2003 - Civil & Environmental Engineering (Alfred Spormann)
Research: Engineering the natural enzyme haloalkane dehalogenase A (DhlA). 
Current Position:  Graduate Student 

Christina Lee 2002-2003 - Chemical Engineering (Stacey Bent)
Research: Micropatterning lens capsule for RPE transplantation. We propose to replace the RPE cells with a healthy layer of tightly packed, hexagonal cells that are organized on a membrane engineered by a combination of microcontact printing, excimer ablation, and new surgical techniques.
Current Position:  Graduate Student

Calvin Lew 2002-2003 - Electrical Engineering (Norbert Pelc)
Research: Integrating a technique into a standard hospital protocol, which is called UNFOLD (UNaliasing by Fourier-encoding Overlaps using the temporaL Domain). UNFOLD reduces the amount of data needed per time frame by assuming the most dynamic part of the object (the heart and great vessels) fill only half the image.
Current Position:  Graduate Student

David Camarillo 2002-2004 - Mechanical Engineering (Ken Salisbury)
Research: Focus in on developing models and control algorithms for flexible robotic manipulators.  The current application is for use in robotically assisted heart surgery by tele-operating a steerable catheter.  I will be graduating in the Summer of 2008.    
Current Position: Graduate Student

Paloma Beamer 2002-2004 - Civil & Environmental Engineering (James Leckie)
Research: Develop a computer model that improves the calculation of exposure and dose of pollutants.  Therefore improving the calculation of exposure and dose could be a major contribution to the estimation of health risk and provide more detailed information on which pollutants and sources are the most important to target in order to protect human health. 
Current Position:  Professor at the University of Arizona.  Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health

Jessica Wuu 2002-2004 - Chemical Engineering (James Swartz)
Research: By optimizing protein expressing using TetA, we hope to be able to generalize this method for production of other membrane proteins, including those from organisms other than E.coli. Using detergents and other manipulations, these proteins can then be transferred to other membranes in different reaction environments.
Current Position:  Protein Design Lab, Hayward, CA

Amy Lum 2002-2004 - Chemical Engineering (Camilla Kao)
Research: Comparing gene transcription profiles and antibiotic titers of the overproducer and wildtype strain under different growth conditions in order to discover biochemical and metabolic pathways that may be altered in the overproducer, From this research, we hope to identify key pathways that contribute to overproduction and thus make steps towards logical engineering of actinomycete strains to overproduce desired natural products.
Current Position:  Kosan Inc.

Monikka Mann 2002-2003 - Mechanical Engineering (Kenneth Goodson)
Research: Research activities are in the area of microscale heat transfer.  
Current Position:  Left Program

Lisa Hwang 2002-2004 - Chemical Engineering (Curtis Frank)
Research: Creating and characterizing a supramolecular assembly with a solid substrate, polymer cushion, lipid bilayer, and transmembrane proteins spans many disciplines including polymer physics, materials science, and biochemistry. The results of this research can potentially be used for the future design of more complex membrane systems containing a broader range of biological components.
Current Position:  Acting Assistant Professor, Stanford University

Viviana Acevedo-Bolton 2003-2004 – Civil and Engineering Engineering (Lynn Hildeman) Current Position:  Graduate Student

Kurt Rhoads 2003-2005 – Civil and Engineering Engineering (Craig Criddle)                        Current Position:  Graduate Student

Michael Lee 2003-2004 – Chemical Engineering (Camilla Koa)                                        Current Position:  Associate Consultant, ZS Associates, San Mateo, CA

Andrew Marshall 2003-2005- Chemistry (Joseph Puglisi)                                                Current Position:  Graduate Student

Matthew Siegel 2004-2005- Chemical Engineering (Chaitan Khosla)                                  Current Position:  TBA

David Weaver 2004-2005- Chemical Engineering (Camilla Koa)                                    Current Position:  Lecturer, Stanford University

Daniel Santos: Mechanical Engineering (advisor- Mark Cutkosky)
Research: My research is in the Biomimetics Lab, using biological principles to guide robotic design. Biological creatures exhibit mobility and robustness that traditional robots cannot duplicate. I study the feet of climbing animals and how they stick to smooth or rough, hard or soft vertical surfaces. Various techniques are used for climbing, and I am developing models to characterize these adhesive mechanisms. These models can then be used for analysis, design, and simulation to assist in robotics for climbing environments.                                     Current Position:  TBA

Douglas Jones: Bioengineering (advisor- Jennifer Cochran)
Research: The Met receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase involved in cell proliferation, motility, differentiation, and survival. Dysregulated Met signaling leads to a phenotype of invasion and metastasis in many types of human tumors, suggesting it may prove an effective target for cancer therapy. My research involves mapping the binding interactions of Met receptor ligands and engineering novel antagonists to block Met receptor activation.                                        Current Position:  Graduate Student

Magdalena Jonikas: Bioengineering (advisor- Russ B. Altman)
Research: I am interested in coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation (MD) of RNA. By simplifying each nucleotide in an RNA structure to a single sphere, the computational complexity of an MD simulation is greatly decreased, allowing for more simulations to be performed. By using information from known RNA structures to define the potentials applied to the simulation, I hope to simulate realistic structures that I can then filter using experimental data about the structure of the molecule, and make predictions about the correct folded structure of an RNA molecule.                                                                                             Current Position:  Graduate Student

Ankit Patel: Chemical Engineering (advisor- Curtis Frank)
Research: Tethering liposomes capable of housing transmembrane proteins to a supported lipid bilayer.                                                                                                                        Current Position:  TBA

Renee Saville: Civil and Environmental Engineering (advisor- Alfred Spormann)
Research: I am interested in the phenomenon of biomass detachment from biofilms. Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous and in addition to their presence in the natural environmental, they profoundly impact all manner of human endeavors. The effect of biofilms can be damaging to health, as in the case with dental disease and biofilm formation on medical devices. By contrast, biofilms in the gut and on the skin are necessary for maintaining human health, where they prevent infection by pathogenic organisms. Biofilms also damage infrastructure such as water pipes and constribute to biofouling in industrial settings, but the impact of biofilms is also crucial to water treatment processes and to bioremediation of pollutant-contaminated areas. It has been observed that widespread shedding of cells, termed detachment, can be induced in biofilms under certain conditions. Such detachments occur in response to an abrupt change in environmental conditions such as nutrient availability. I am interested in the physiology and regulation of this phenomenon. The understanding of inducible detachment in biofilms found in a variety of settings, as well as the ability to influence biofilm dynamics by novel drugs or compounds. One potentially very important.                                                                   Current Position:  Graduate Student

Deborah Stoner: dstoner@stanford.edu-Chemical Engineering (advisor- Camilla Kao)
Research: We are interested in studying mutations in bacteria that lead to the overproduction of small molecule natural products. For my research, I am beginning with strains of E. coli and the actinomycete bacterium S. coelicolor that have been engineered to produce the antibiotic erythromycin. We can then study the overexpression or introduction of genes by using a genomic DNA plasmid library or study the loss of gene function by performing transposon mutagenesis. Both of these methods should produce identifiable mutations so that we can learn how to rationally engineer bacteria to overexpress similar natural products.                       Current Position:  Graduate Student

Eric Cocker: ecocker@stanford.edu-Biological Science (advisor- Mark Schnitzer)
Research: My current research is on the development of a miniature two-photon microscope for brain imaging in awake, freely moving mice. While similar research has been conducted on rats, mice are the standard models for disease and thus provide a much richer medium for study. With this device, we will be able to study small groups of neurons in their naturally occurring state and free from the effects of anesthesia currently required for in vivo Imaging. Current Position:  Graduate Student 

Marian Goebes: mdgoebes@stanford.edu-Civil and Environmental Engineering (advisor- Lynn Hildemann)
Research: Inhalation of airborne mold particles causes allergies and asthma in sensitive people. Species within the genus of mold called Aspergillus can also cause fatal pulmonary infections in patients with compromised immune systems (e.g., chemotherapy patients). In the first part of my research project, I developed a method for quantifying Aspergillus particulates which uses a DNA-based assay, making it more sensitive and reliable than culturing. The second part of the project involves using the method to investigate causes of high Aspergillus concentrations, including construction, and the operation of air conditioning or ventilation systems.  Current Position:  TBA

Julia Salas: jesalas@stanford.edu-Chemistry (advisor- Edward Solomon)
Research: I study the mechanism of oxygen activation by the noncoupled binuclear copper enzymes PHM and DBM. PHM is involved in activating neurotransmitters and DBM converts dopamine to norepinephrine. I use a variety of spectrocopic techniques including Absorption, CD, MCD, EPR, and Resonance Raman spectroscopy coupled to DFT calculations to characterize and study a variety of intermediates, model complexes, and enzyme complexes relevant to the mechanism of these enzymes.  Current Position:  Graduate Student

Jared Starman: jstarman@stanford.edu-Electrical Engineering (advisor- Rebecca Fahrig)
Research: My research is improving image quality for x-ray imaging. Specifically, the targeted modality is intervential, C-Arm computed tomography (CT). Currently I am working on ways to reduce image artifacts when incomplete datasets are acquired due to the x-ray detector being too small. In addition, I am also investigating ways to model and correct for the non-ideal temporal response functions of flat-panel x-ray detectors that are beginning to be used in CT.  Current Position:  Graduate Student

Isoken Airen : iairen@stanford.edu-Electrical Engineering (advisor- James Swartz)
Research: The objective of my current research project is to functionally express the complete Escherichia coli K-12 genome, with the aim of identifying proteins that influence the in vitro metabolism and the processes of transcription, translation, and protein folding. All of the open reading frames (ORFs) of E. coli have been identified, but only about 70% of them have known function. My goal is to determine the functions of the remaining ORFs, utilizing a novel in vitro genetics approach for the survey of the ~3800 genes. The genome characterization involves the following steps: (i) analyzing the influence of the gene products on the expression and activity of the indicator protein(s); (ii) investigating the biochemistry of the observed effects via metabolic analysis of the cell-free system (amino acid, nucleotide, organic acid concentrations; mRNA, DNA stability); and (iii) generating possible activity assays and mechanisms that explain the observations. With this information, I will then be able to engineer the cell extract in order to enhance the production efficiency of the cell-free protein synthesis system. Genes that negatively affect the production system will be deleted from the source cell chromosome, if they are not essential for cell growth and survival; whereas, those that encode the positive effects will be overexpressed by incorporating them into the source genome or by adding them to the extract.Current Position:  Graduate Student

 

 


To contact us:
Roosmery Yang - NIH Grant Administrator
Department of Chemical Engineering
Stauffer III, Mail Code 5025
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-5025
Tel: (650) 736-1807
Fax: (650) 725-7294
rwyang@stanford.edu

Link to Stanford University's Site

Professor James Swartz - Project DIrector
Department of Chemical Engineering
Stauffer III, Mail Code 5025
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-5025
Tel: (650) 723-5398
Fax: (650) 725-7294
jswartz@stanford.edu