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Branner Blog » Maps
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Japanese Imperial Maps article

November 22nd, 2011

The recent issue of ReMix contains an article summarizing the symposium on Japanese maps, in which Branner Library participated last October.

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Japanese Imperial Maps as Sources for East Asian History: A Symposium on the History and Future of the Gaihozu

Please join us for a talk by Professor Kobayashi Shigeru!

Stanford University owns a large but uncatalogued set of Japanese colonial surveys (gaihōzu), mostly from the 1930s and 40s, including detailed topographical maps of the entire empire as well as thematic maps for Manchuria. While similar materials also exist in other collections (the Library of Congress, as well as more than a dozen other institutions in the US, Taiwan, & Japan), these maps have mostly lain outside of the purview of colonial historians until now. This symposium will examine the utility of these colonial maps as tools for historical research. Our presenters represent a diverse, international group of scholars who are interested in reconstructing past landscapes—whether urban or rural—and analyzing colonial development priorities and practices by using cartographic documents as a resource.

When:
Friday, October 7, 2011. 05:00 PM.
Approximate duration of 1.5 hour(s).
Where:
Building 200 - Room 307, History Corner, Main Quad (Map)
Admission:
Free and open to the public. RSVP requested by October 5 to Sayoko Sakakibara at sakakibara@stanford.edu. Please include name, affiliation
and field of study.
For more information, visit: http://events.stanford.edu/events/290/29043

Branner Library’s new exhibit features two vastly different atlases, one designed specifically for “the masses” and the other to be so exclusive that only “1 in 3.3 million people” on the planet will own it.

The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge in England was formed in 1826 specifically to create works about a variety of subject matter, written in a plain manner and published at a reasonable price allowing for mass readership. The atlas on display is one of the last printed by the group from 1844.

Millennium House published “Earth” in 2008 and issued two editions: two thousand copies of the Royal Blue and one thousand copies of the Imperial Gold. The atlas is truly spectacular with 355 maps and over 800 photographs many of them taken by National Geographic photographers. Designed to impress, it certainly fulfills its mission.

Come by and take a look for yourself!

Fall 2009 Newsletter

September 29th, 2009

Welcome to the 2009-2010 school year.  Information about new materials, changes in access and interfaces, and budget cuts appears in the

Fall 2009 Newsletter

Geographic Visualization

September 30th, 2008

Geographic Visualization

We got an interesting new book in just the other day. It’s called “Geographic Visualization: Concepts, Tools and Applications.” The book has contributed chapters by people doing very creative things with spatial information. For example, there is a discussion about Google Earth and its use in social science research - problems found with georectification of imagery, differences in resolution in the tiling, and oddities in mapping census information. Other chapters deal with map animation, a discussion of the WorldMapper project’s innovative use of cartograms, and a critical evaluation of 3-D geographical visualization. The book includes plenty of good illustrations and references. Well worth looking at if you’re embarking on a mapping project and want to use new technology.

Welcome back!

September 22nd, 2008

Welcome to the 2008/2009 school year! We’ve been busy at the library over the summer working on access to new digital content, loading digital book content into Socrates, and expanding the map and GIS collections. You can find out more about these changes by reading the fall newsletter.

Stanford affiliates now have access to the California Sanborn Fire Insurance maps from 1867-1970. These maps provide a unique view of the history of California’s cities and towns show urban growth, changes in ownership, building use, and materials.

NASA and Antarctica

November 28th, 2007

In honor of the International Polar Year, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), created LIMA, the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica.

From the site: “As the first major scientific outcome of the IPY, LIMA truly fulfills the IPY goals. LIMA is an international effort, supports current scientific polar research, encourages new projects, and helps the general public visualize Antarctica and changes happening to this southernmost environment. Researchers and the general public can download LIMA and all of the component Landsat scenes at no charge.”

Take a look.

[via] Climate Feedback.

Festival of Maps

November 16th, 2007

Are you going to be in or around Chicago between now and March 2008? If you love cartography, you will not want to miss the Festival of Maps. Over 30 organizations are joining in this city-wide celebration by hosting exhibits, talks, and meetings devoted to cartography. The Field Museum has mounted an exhibit entitled “Maps: Finding Our Place in the World” featuring a stone Inca map, a landscape vessel from Peru, a eucalyptus bark map from Australia, as well as more conventional maps from the 1200s to the present. The University of Chicago is hosting an exhibit featuring the spectacular Roman “Speculum Romanae Magnificentiae dating from the mid-1570’s. The Art Institute of Chicago has mounted an exhibit of historical maps of Paris. Other events can be found at the Festival of Maps Web site.

Wildfire imagery

October 24th, 2007

NASA Fire image, October 24, 2007

Satellite imagery and digital mapping has changed the way we interact with and know about large-scale disasters. A case in point are the Southern California wildfires.

The San Diego Office Of Emergency Services is releasing maps each day of the burn areas, the perimeters of the fires, and the evacuation areas.

NASA has a series of satellite images showing the spread of the fires over the past few days over all of Southern California, one taken from the Space Shuttle Discovery as it rose into orbit on Tuesday.

Google is offering content from KPBS, which can be loaded into Google Earth.

The US Forest Service has released infrared imagery showing the locations and intensity of the fires in San Diego. I have yet to be able to access this imagery. My guess is the traffic has been so heavy that the site is down. Keep trying to get in over the next few days.