Main

October 12, 2009

Reflections on Video Conferencing and Best Practices for Communicating Ideas across Cultures

On October 13, 14, 15 and 16th, students from Stanford University and the University of Sydney participated in a video conferencing exchange to develop effective strategies for presenting ideas across cultures. The exchange involved over 125 students. Below, the globally-distributed student groups have posted their reflections about their experience and some best practices for effective intercultural communication.

screenshot10132009threeSMALL.jpg

May 11, 2009

Sydney-Stanford Video Conferences

During the week of May 11th, several classes from Stanford University and the University of Sydney met through video conferencing to practice their presentation skills and talk about their research topics -- within the framework of intercultural exchange. The students in Sydney were studying writing and presentation across cultures -- while the Stanford students were all enrolled in writing class, but with a variety of themes : The Rhetoric of Gaming, the Rhetoric of Global Leadership, and the Rhetoric of the Bicycle, to name just a few.

screenshot2b.jpg

Below you'll find the students' reflections on this experience.

Communicating ideas across cultures: some best practices

Below you'll find best practices for presenting ideas (whether that be an analysis of a visual text or a research topic) generated by globally distributed student groups comprised of students from Stanford University and the University of Sydney. The students developed these lists after presenting to each other during a video conference on the week of May 11th.

November 19, 2008

Megan, Benamy, Aidan, Stanford Group F Research Arguments

Megan, Benamy, and Aidan of Stanford Group F present their original research and arguments.

102928.jpg

From all of us:
We are three Stanford undergraduates writing for our Writing and Rhetoric class. We invite you to read and learn from our research. The topics we are writing on were all individually chosen, so they have special significance to each of us. It's our pleasure to share our work with you.

From Benamy:
My research concerns the campaign for clean coal in America. The campaign is led by the special interest group, the "American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity," which runs a slew of ads across the media, which have profound affects on public opinion of clean coal. This public opinion and active lobbying by ACCCE all have affects on energy policy in America. I argue that the ads mislead the American public with misinformation and by using empty rhetoric. The energy policy these strategies promote is wrong for America.

coal.jpg

From Megan:
My argument will discuss the current forms of exploitation of the Maori culture utilized by New Zealand advertisers. Domestic exploitation by ignorant and insensitive advertisers will be analyzed along with international exploitation by advertisers misusing the Maori culture for financial gain. The argument’s main purpose, however, will be to analyze exploitation so that recommendations can be made for solutions that will prevent and reduce it. Social advertising will be given as a concrete example of a successful solution. This example, along with other plans for change recommended by a New Zealand marketing authority, will provide the argument with the information necessary to extrapolate a proactive plan of action for the Maori.

MeganImage4Blog.jpg


From Aidan:
In 1980, more than 120,000 Cuban refugees came to the United States. Many of them were gay. No government or religious agency would assist them. The gay and lesbian community in the United States (gay church groups in particular) pulled together to resettle these refugees, and help them assimilate into U.S. culture. Much of the rhetoric they employed in recruiting sponsors for these refugees relied on the ideas of brotherhood and unity across culture. But things did not quite go as originally envisioned – language barriers, class differences, racial tensions, and different expectations on the part of refugees and sponsors all got in the way of making the initial utopian ideals a reality.

aidan image ccr blog.JPG

October 29, 2008

Page to Screen Meets The Rhetoric of Research

marratech.jpgToday the University of Sydney's Page to Screen class meets Stanford University's The Rhetoric of Research.

I'm trying to think of a catchy title for the experience, riffing on Rebecca Johinke's title for her course. Perhaps the videoconference is "From Classroom to Screen"? Or "Screen into Classroom"? Or "The Terministic Screen" (that's a rhetoric reference).

How about "In Marratech, No One Can Hear You Screen?" Let's hope not.

Both classes will be asked to document their reflections on the experience by commenting on this post.

Image: the Marratech interface, taken in Wallenberg Hall, Stanford, during the 2nd Annual Symposium on Cross-Cultural Rhetoric, June 9, 2008.

Continue reading "Page to Screen Meets The Rhetoric of Research" »

October 22, 2008

Lemon Face, Lion Face?

This blog entry is part of a Fall 2008 blogging exchange between University of Sydney and Stanford University. To read all the entries, follow this thread; be sure read the earliest entries first.

This satirical message about lemon and lion faces has been removed. We applaud the creativity and humor of the two Sydney University students who posted the message and hope that they will henceforth publicise their important research in another forum.

A Rhetorical Potpourri [group C]

This blog entry is part of a Fall 2008 blogging exchange between University of Sydney and Stanford University. To read all the entries, follow this thread; be sure read the earliest entries first.

At a world class research university like Stanford, the diversity of academic pursuits is overwhelming. Every day on campus there are countless events and speakers representing the entire academic spectrum. Our PWR2 oral communications class mimics this campus-wide diversity but on a smaller scale. Here are some of the projects we are working on this quarter analyzing rhetoric in a variety of settings.

Continue reading "A Rhetorical Potpourri [group C]" »

Those Things You Cannot Say (Group A)

This blog entry is part of a Fall 2008 blogging exchange between University of Sydney and Stanford University. To read all the entries, follow this thread; be sure read the earliest entries first.


By The Rocketeer

We walked into our PWR2 class this fine Monday afternoon to find the whiteboards littered with comments written on students’ papers in peer review. They ranged from “okay” to “weak” to “oh for f---’s sake,” spanning perhaps the gambit of human emotion that can be expressed about Research Based Arguments.

Our group is divided on the effectiveness of peer review in a classroom setting. We all agree that in theory it can be rewarding, but some of us feel that in practice, social norms prevent us from expressing our true feelings. It’s in no one’s best interest to hold back constructive criticism, yet somehow the cat of culture has got our tongue.

Peer review represents a very narrow forum--it’s one person conversing with another person about one project. In real life, however, hundreds upon thousands of people may read a single document. Being politically correct has become a nationwide concern, and in our environment of Stanford University, the student body is quite conscious of what can and should be said in a public setting.

ENGL3611-Emma, Victoria & Carissa.jpg

More on this PLUS a video, after the break.

Continue reading "Those Things You Cannot Say (Group A)" »

Let Sleeping Dogs Lie [Group B]

This blog entry is part of a Fall 2008 blogging exchange between University of Sydney and Stanford University. To read all the entries, follow this thread; be sure read the earliest entries first.

It is better to be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt....

˙uʍop-ǝpısdn sɯǝǝs ƃuıɥʇʎɹǝʌǝ puɐ ʎdool ǝlʇʇıl ɐ ǝɹɐ ǝʍ :uoısɹǝʌuı ǝɥʇ uopɹɐd ˙ʎʇısɹǝʌıun pɹoɟuɐʇs ɯoɹɟ ɐılɐɹʇsnɐ uı spuǝıɹɟ ɹno oʇ ollǝɥ

Hello,

The three of us are very excited to meet you. Unfortunately, we’re sleepy. You probably are too. Actually, because of time zones, you may be sleeping right now. If that is the case, we’re jealous. We believe that this may be having a detrimental effect on our powers of creativity and cognition. Furthermore, while we know that we are supposed to introduce ourselves as well as discussion topics based on our research experience, we’re still at a bit of a loss as to exactly what to write. We’ll attempt some individual introductions, we guess.

Continue reading "Let Sleeping Dogs Lie [Group B] " »

October 20, 2008

Productive Procrastination (Group E)

This blog entry is part of a Fall 2008 blogging exchange between University of Sydney and Stanford University. To read all the entries, follow this thread; be sure read the earliest entries first.

We are writing for the Program in Writing and Rhetoric class The Rhetoric of Research.

Our eight page essay on rhetoric and research was due today. We all wrote it yesterday. As a result of our procrastination, we are writing this on a substantial amount of sleep debt. While writing this, we are procrastinating. It took us at least 20 minutes to decide on a suitable title and topic for this blog post.

Shoes Desk.jpg


In the process of sharing experiences, we discovered remarkable similarities in our methods of procrastination. Foremost among our discoveries was that research is a prominent and vital part of the procrastination toolkit of the Stanford student. Some of us use the web, some the library, but the motivation is the same. We are never satisfied with the amount of information we have. As we research, we change our interests and our ideas about our research topic. Because of this constant change, we put off the actual writing of the paper until the very last possible moment.

ENGL3611-Group E.jpg

Continue reading "Productive Procrastination (Group E)" »

The Editor's Safety Net [Group D]

This blog entry is part of a Fall 2008 blogging exchange between University of Sydney and Stanford University. To read all the entries, follow this thread; be sure read the earliest entries first.

300px-Talk-icon.svg.png

We are Carlos Shimizu, Yong Liang Tan, and Nathaniel Shar, and we're studying the "rhetoric of research" -- analyzing the ways people talk to each other about academic topics. Carlos' current research project aims to illustrate how various genres of music utilize rhetoric for a specific agenda, and to show how their use of rhetoric may or may not differ with the 5 traditional canons of rhetoric. Yong's project compares the rhetoric of Western and Chinese perspectives of female infanticide in China in the late 20th century. Nathaniel's research investigates the relationship between the rhetoric of mathematics teaching and the prevalence of innumeracy in American society.

Despite our diverse interests, all our papers will have one thing in common: they will all be revised, perhaps multiple times. Peer editing is an integral part of this process. This year, we will be conducting our peer edits online rather than in person.

ENGL3611-3 groups at work.jpg

Continue reading "The Editor's Safety Net [Group D]" »