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"Neoliberalization" as betrayal : state, feminism, and a women's education program in India

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

Comparative feminist studies series, Palgrave Macmillan, Volume 1st, New York, p.274 (2011)

Call Number:

Cubb LB1727 .I4 S42 2011

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/9315576

Keywords:

Education and state--India, Educational equalization--India, Mahila Samakhya Program, Neoliberalism--India, Women in development--India, Women teachers--Training of--India

Abstract:

Contents: Machine generated contents note: One."Education for Women's Equality and Empowerment": The Manila Samakhya Program (MS) (1989) -- Two."Getting There, Being There": Using Ethnography, Investigating Ethnography in Chitrakoot and Delhi -- Three."When I Say We, I Don't Mean Me": Neoliberal Bureaucracy and Techniques of National Governance -- Four."We Have to Move from Conceptualization to Operationalization": (Un)Easy Relationships between State and Feminism -- Five."Empowerment Was Never Conceptualized as Entitlement": Problems in Operationalizing a "Feminist" Program -- Six."Empowerment Should Be Collective": Four "Truth-Tales".; Summary: Using_initiatives by_non-governmental organizations to promote women's empowerment in rural India, this book draws new conclusions about the three-way relationship between neoliberalism, women's education, and spatialization of the state. Sharma_gets to the heart of the assumptions and blindspots inherent in these programs and makes an important contribution to the debate about the_institutionalization of women's education.

Publication Language:

eng

Notes:

"Using initiatives by non-governmental organizations to promote women's empowerment in rural India, this book draws new conclusions about the three-way relationship between neoliberalism, women's education, and spatialization of the state. Sharma gets to the heart of the assumptions and blindspots inherent in these programs and makes an important contribution to the debate about the institutionalization of women's education."