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Schooling the freed people: Teaching, learning, and the struggle for black freedom, 1861-1876

Schooling the Freed People

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, p.314 (2010)

Call Number:

Cubb LC2802 .S9 B874 2010

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/8785566

Keywords:

1865-1877), African American teachers--Southern States--History--19th century, Education--Southern States--History--19th century, Freedmen--Education--Southern States, Reconstruction (U.S. history

Abstract:

Contents: At the dawn of freedom -- To serve my own people: black teachers in the Southern black schools -- It will result in a better understanding of their duties: Southern white teachers and the limits of emancipation -- A desire to labor in the missionary cause: Northern white teachers and the ambiguities of emancipation -- You will, of course, wish to know all about our school: learning and teaching in the freed people's schools -- Race, reconstruction, and redemption: the fate of emancipation and education, 1861-1876 -- Appendix A: teachers in the freed people's schools, 1861-1876 -- Appendix B: estimating the number of black and southern white teachers, 1869-1876.

Publication Language:

eng

Notes:

"Conventional wisdom holds that freedmen's education was largely the work of privileged, single white northern women motivated by evangelical beliefs and abolitionism. Schooling the Freed People shattered this notion entirely."