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How students come to be, know, and do : a case for a broad view of learning

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

Learning in doing, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge England ; New York, p.215 (2010)

Call Number:

Cubb LB1060 .H47 2010

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/8831873

Keywords:

City children--Education (Elementary)--United States--Case studies, Group work in education--United States--Case studies, Interpersonal relations--Study and teaching (Elementary)--United States--Case studies, Learning--United States--Case studies, Science--Study and teaching (Elementary)--United States--Case studies

Abstract:

Summary: "Studies of learning are too frequently conceptualized only in terms of knowledge development. Yet it is vital to pay close attention to the social and emotional aspects of learning in order to understand why and how it occurs. How Students Come to Be, Know, and Do builds a theoretical argument for and a methodological approach to studying learning in a holistic way. The authors provide examples of urban fourth graders from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds studying science as a way to illustrate how this model contributes to a more complete and complex understanding of learning in school settings. What makes this book unique is its insistence that to fully understand human learning we have to consider the affective-volitional processes of learning along with the more familiar emphasis on knowledge and skills. Developing interest, persisting in the face of difficulty, actively listening to others' ideas, accepting and responding to feedback, and challenging ideas are crucial dimensions of students' experiences that are often ignored"--Provided by publisher.

Publication Language:

eng