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Reading, writing, and segregation : a century of Black women teachers in Nashville

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

Women in American history, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, p.182 (2008)

Call Number:

Cubb LC2731 .R36 2008

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/7513248

Keywords:

African American women teachers--Tennessee--Nashville--History, Discrimination in education--Tennessee--Nashville--History, Segregation in education--Tennessee--Nashville--History

Notes:

"Reading, Writing, and Segregation's great strength is its focus on black women teachers themselves, often by using interviews, and thus illuminating the culture of teaching and civic activism that these women forged over a century. An important addition to the controversy about how much (or how little) black teachers contributed to a narrowly defined civil rights movement and the debate about the 'failure' of Brown vs. Board of Education, this book is one of the few that tell us what it was actually like in segregated black schools. Without work like Ramsey's, debating the 'failure' of Brown is a circular debate based on nostalgia, and not on historical information."--Glenda Gilmore, Peter V. and C. Vann Woodward Professor of History, Yale University