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No choirboy: Murder, violence, and teenagers on death row

Publication Type:

Book

Authors:

Kuklin,Susan

Source:

Henry Holt and Co., Volume 1st, New York, p.212 (2008)

Call Number:

Cubb Curr HV8699 .U5 K84 2008

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/8380672

Keywords:

Administration of--United States--Juvenile literature, American Library Association Best Books for YA 2009, Capital punishment--United States, Capital punishment--United States--Juvenile literature, Death row inmates--United States--Interviews, Death row inmates--United States--Interviews--Juvenile literature, etc.--United States--Juvenile literature, Juvenile delinquents--Legal status, Juvenile delinquents--Legal status, laws, etc.--United States, Juvenile justice, Juvenile justice, Administration of--United States, laws, Notable Children's Trade Book/Social Studies 2009, School Library Journal Best Books 2008

Abstract:

Contents: I was a teenager on death row chapter -- The fourteen-year-old adult -- Look at me -- Hate is a killer, dialogue I -- Private with our grief, dialogue II -- Dying for legal assistance : Roy's and Mark's lawyer.; Summary: In their own voices--raw and uncensored--inmates sentenced to death as teenagers talk about their lives in prison, and share their thoughts and feelings about how they ended up there. Susan Kuklin also gets inside the system, exploring capital punishment itself and the intricacies and inequities of criminal justice in the United States.

Notes:

"Until recently, only eight countries in the world still sentenced people younger than eighteen to death for their crimes -- Iran, China, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Pakistan, and the United States of America. No Choirboy takes readers into American prisons and allows inmates sentenced to death as teenagers to speak for themselves. In their own voices - raw and uncensored - they talk about their lives in prison and share their thoughts and feelings about how they ended up there. Susan Kuklin also gets inside the system, exploring capital punishment itself and the intricacies and inequities of criminal justice in the United States. This is a searing, unforgettable read, one that could change the way we think about crime and punishment." Lexile measure 690; ages 14-up; book level 5.2; nonfiction