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The unchosen me : race, gender, and identity among black women in college

Publication Type:

Book

Source:

Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., p.227 (2009)

Call Number:

Cubb LC2781 .W57 2009

URL:

http://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/8438902

Keywords:

Black--Education (Higher)--United States, Black--United States--Social conditions, Blacks--Education (Higher)--United States, College students, Group identity--United States, Sex discrimination in higher education--United States, Universities and colleges--United States--Sociological aspects, Women

Abstract:

Contents: The "problem" of race and gender -- The unchosen me : the intersection of opportunity, privilege, and choice -- Research across the color line : empowerment, mutual learning, and difficult decisions -- Walking in enemy territory : being black on campus -- Academic performances : between the spotlight and invisibility -- "Too white" or "too ghetto"? : the racial tug-of-war for black women -- Learning to be a "good woman" : interpreting womanhood through race -- The unchosen me and the interactions that create race and gender.

Notes:

"Racial and gender inequities persist among college students, despite ongoing efforts to combat them. Students of color face alienation, stereotyping, low expectations, and lingering racism even as they actively engage in the academic and social worlds of college life. The Unchosen Me examines the experiences of African American collegiate women and the identity-related pressures they encounter both on and off campus. Rachelle Winkle-Wagner finds that the predominantly white college environment often denies African American students the chance to determine their own sense of self. Even the very programs and policies developed to promote racial equality may effectively impose "unchosen" identities on underrepresented students. She offers clear evidence of this interactive process, showing how race, gender, and identity are created through interactions among one's self, others, and society. "