kumar:123301

Summary

Measurements of the fluid and particle mobilities in strong electric fields. A. Kumar, E. Elele, M. Yeksel, B. Khusid, Z. Qiu and A. Acrivos. Physics of Fluids, 18(12):123301, 2006. (URL)

Abstract

We present a method for measuring both the fluid and particle velocities in strong electric fields and carefully analyze the repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements. The experiments were conducted in 50-micron capillaries containing dilute aqueous suspensions of 4-micron polystyrene spheres subjected to dc as well as ac (5-50 Hz) fields of strengths up to 1 and 0.6 kV/cm, respectively. These measurements indicate that the predictions of classical linear theories for electrokinetic phenomena apply well beyond the range of relatively weak electric fields for which these theories were developed. The results of our studies are critical for the quantification of microanalytical systems which make use of electrokinetic phenomena for the transport, control, and manipulation of fluids and particles

Bibtex entry

@ARTICLE { kumar:123301,
    AUTHOR = { A. Kumar and E. Elele and M. Yeksel and B. Khusid and Z. Qiu and A. Acrivos },
    TITLE = { Measurements of the fluid and particle mobilities in strong electric fields },
    YEAR = { 2006 },
    JOURNAL = { Physics of Fluids },
    VOLUME = { 18 },
    NUMBER = { 12 },
    PAGES = { 123301 },
    URL = { http://link.aip.org/link/?PHF/18/123301/1 },
    ABSTRACT = { We present a method for measuring both the fluid and particle velocities in strong electric fields and carefully analyze the repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements. The experiments were conducted in 50-micron capillaries containing dilute aqueous suspensions of 4-micron polystyrene spheres subjected to dc as well as ac (5-50 Hz) fields of strengths up to 1 and 0.6 kV/cm, respectively. These measurements indicate that the predictions of classical linear theories for electrokinetic phenomena apply well beyond the range of relatively weak electric fields for which these theories were developed. The results of our studies are critical for the quantification of microanalytical systems which make use of electrokinetic phenomena for the transport, control, and manipulation of fluids and particles },
}