helmer_campo_eaton12

Summary

Three-dimensional features of a Mach 2.1 shock/boundary layer interaction. D. Helmer, L.M. Campo and J.K. Eaton. Experiments in Fluids, 53(5):1347-1368, 2012. (URL)

Abstract

2D particle image velocimetry was used to study the three-dimensionality of the shock-boundary layer interaction generated by a small 20 deg. compression ramp in a low aspect ratio continuously operated wind tunnel. High-resolution data were taken in four streamwise-wallnormal planes: three planes located in the sidewall boundary layer and one near the tunnel centerline. The incoming boundary layer was found to show three-dimensionality, with significant overshoot in the velocity profiles observed near the sidewall. The size of the wedge influenced the interaction, which was weaker than that observed in the case of a large compression wedge. The flow turning angle was 8 deg. near the tunnel centerline and changed significantly across the span. Measurements behind the compression wedge in the centerline plane showed that both velocity and turbulence properties were nearly fully recovered $14\delta$ behind the compression corner. The shock angle varied with spanwise position, and a multi-shock structure was observed in the sidewall planes. The size of the interaction decreased in the sidewall boundary layer. Non-monotonic variations in both velocity and turbulence profiles across the sidewall planes suggest the presence of significant spanwise flows, possibly corner vortices.

Bibtex entry

@ARTICLE { helmer_campo_eaton12,
    AUTHOR = { D. Helmer and L.M. Campo and J.K. Eaton },
    TITLE = { Three-dimensional features of a Mach 2.1 shock/boundary layer interaction },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    JOURNAL = { Experiments in Fluids },
    VOLUME = { 53 },
    NUMBER = { 5 },
    PAGES = { 1347--1368 },
    ABSTRACT = { 2D particle image velocimetry was used to study the three-dimensionality of the shock-boundary layer interaction generated by a small 20 deg. compression ramp in a low aspect ratio continuously operated wind tunnel. High-resolution data were taken in four streamwise-wallnormal planes: three planes located in the sidewall boundary layer and one near the tunnel centerline. The incoming boundary layer was found to show three-dimensionality, with significant overshoot in the velocity profiles observed near the sidewall. The size of the wedge influenced the interaction, which was weaker than that observed in the case of a large compression wedge. The flow turning angle was 8 deg. near the tunnel centerline and changed significantly across the span. Measurements behind the compression wedge in the centerline plane showed that both velocity and turbulence properties were nearly fully recovered $14\delta$ behind the compression corner. The shock angle varied with spanwise position, and a multi-shock structure was observed in the sidewall planes. The size of the interaction decreased in the sidewall boundary layer. Non-monotonic variations in both velocity and turbulence profiles across the sidewall planes suggest the presence of significant spanwise flows, possibly corner vortices. },
    URL = { http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00348-012-1363-8 },
}