park_wallace_wu_moin12

Summary

Boundary layer turbulence in transitional and developed states. G.I. Park, J.M. Wallace, X. Wu and P. Moin. Physics of Fluids, 24(3), 2012. (URL)

Abstract

Using the recent direct numerical simulations by Wu and Moin [``Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer,'' Phys. Fluids 22, 85 (2010)] of a flat-plate boundary layer with a passively heated wall, statistical properties of the turbulence in transition at Re_theta ~ 300, from individual turbulent spots, and at Re_theta ~ 500, where the spots merge (distributions of the mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, kinetic energy production, and dissipation rates, enstrophy and its components) have been compared to these statistical properties for the developed boundary layer turbulence at Re_theta = 1840. When the distributions in the transitional regions are conditionally averaged so as to exclude locations and times when the flow is not turbulent, they closely resemble the distributions in the developed turbulent state at the higher Reynolds number, especially in the buffer layer. Skin friction coefficients, determined in this conditional manner at the two Reynolds numbers in the transitional flow are, of course, much larger than when their values are obtained by including both turbulent and non-turbulent information there, and the conditional averaged values are consistent with the 1/7-th power law approximation. An octant analysis based on the combinations of signs of the velocity and temperature fluctuations shows that the momentum and heat fluxes are predominantly of the mean gradient type in both the transitional and developed regions. The fluxes appear to be closely associated with vortices that transport momentum and heat toward and away from the wall in both regions of the flow. The results suggest that there may be little fundamental difference between the nonlinear processes involved in the formation of turbulent spots that appear in transition and those that sustain the turbulence when it is developed. They also support the view that the transport processes and the vortical structures that drive them in developed and transitional boundary layer turbulence are, in many dynamically important respects, similar.

Bibtex entry

@ARTICLE { park_wallace_wu_moin12,
    AUTHOR = { G.I. Park and J.M. Wallace and X. Wu and P. Moin },
    TITLE = { Boundary layer turbulence in transitional and developed states },
    JOURNAL = { Physics of Fluids },
    VOLUME = { 24 },
    NUMBER = { 3 },
    YEAR = { 2012 },
    ABSTRACT = { Using the recent direct numerical simulations by Wu and Moin [``Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer,'' Phys. Fluids 22, 85 (2010)] of a flat-plate boundary layer with a passively heated wall, statistical properties of the turbulence in transition at Re_theta ~ 300, from individual turbulent spots, and at Re_theta ~ 500, where the spots merge (distributions of the mean velocity, Reynolds stresses, kinetic energy production, and dissipation rates, enstrophy and its components) have been compared to these statistical properties for the developed boundary layer turbulence at Re_theta = 1840. When the distributions in the transitional regions are conditionally averaged so as to exclude locations and times when the flow is not turbulent, they closely resemble the distributions in the developed turbulent state at the higher Reynolds number, especially in the buffer layer. Skin friction coefficients, determined in this conditional manner at the two Reynolds numbers in the transitional flow are, of course, much larger than when their values are obtained by including both turbulent and non-turbulent information there, and the conditional averaged values are consistent with the 1/7-th power law approximation. An octant analysis based on the combinations of signs of the velocity and temperature fluctuations shows that the momentum and heat fluxes are predominantly of the mean gradient type in both the transitional and developed regions. The fluxes appear to be closely associated with vortices that transport momentum and heat toward and away from the wall in both regions of the flow. The results suggest that there may be little fundamental difference between the nonlinear processes involved in the formation of turbulent spots that appear in transition and those that sustain the turbulence when it is developed. They also support the view that the transport processes and the vortical structures that drive them in developed and transitional boundary layer turbulence are, in many dynamically important respects, similar. },
    URL = { http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3693146 },
}