Link to Research
Renewables > Bioenergy

Capturing Electrical Current via Microbes to Produce Methane

Start Date: September 2011

Investigators

Alfred Spormann, Departments of Chemical Engineering, and of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University; and Bruce Logan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pennsylvania State University

Annual Reports

Publications

  • Siegert, M., Yates, M.D., Spormann, A.M. and Logan, B.E. Methanobacterium Dominates¬† Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 3:7, 1668-1676 (2015).
  • Siegert, M., Yates, M.D., Call, D.F., Zhu, X., Spormann, A. and Logan, B.E. Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, 2:4, 910-917 (2014).
  • Siegert, M., X.-F. Li, M.D. Yates, and B.E. Logan. 2015. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanohens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells. Frontiers Microbiol. 5:798(article)

Presentations

  • Yilmazel, Y.D. Enhanced Electromethanogenesis by enrichment and isolation of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Poster presentation. The 5th International Meeting on Microbial Electrochemistry and Technologies. International Society for Microbial Electrochemistry and Technologies (ISMET), Tempe, AZ, USA, October 2015.

  • Yilmazel, Y.D. Enrichment of electrothrophic microorganisms for enhanced electrosynthesis of acetate and methane in microbial electrolysis cells. Poster presentation. Association of Environmental Engineering & Science Professors (AEESP) Research and Education Conference, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA, June 2015.
  • Siegert M. Cathodes of microbial electrolysis cells (MEC) support preferential growth of methanogens. Oral presentation. 4th NA- International Society for Microbial Electrochemistry and Technologies (ISMET) Conference, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, May 2014.
  • Siegert M. Cathodes of microbial electrolysis cells (MEC) support preferential growth of methanogens. Oral presentation. Pittsburgh Bacterial Meeting, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, March 2014.
  • Logan, B. E. Introduction to MFCs and MECs, and using MECs to produce methane. Invited lecture. Stanford University, GCEP. October 2012.

Updated July 2016

Yilmazel, Y.D. Enhanced Electromethanogenesis by enrichment and isolation of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Poster presentation. The 5th International Meeting on Microbial Electrochemistry and Technologies. International Society for Microbial Electrochemistry and Technologies (ISMET), Tempe, AZ, USA, October 2015.

Yilmazel, Y.D. Enrichment of electrothrophic microorganisms for enhanced electrosynthesis of acetate and methane in microbial electrolysis cells. Poster presentation. Association of Environmental Engineering & Science Professors (AEESP) Research and Education Conference, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA, June 2015.

Siegert M. Cathodes of microbial electrolysis cells (MEC) support preferential growth of methanogens. Oral presentation. Pittsburgh Bacterial Meeting, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, March 2014.

Siegert M. Cathodes of microbial electrolysis cells (MEC) support preferential growth of methanogens. Oral presentation. 4th NA- International Society for Microbial Electrochemistry and Technologies (ISMET) Conference, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, May 2014.

Logan, B. E. Introduction to MFCs and MECs, and using MECs to produce methane. Invited lecture. Stanford University, GCEP. October 2012.