NEWS

September 22, 2016: Efficient genome engineering approaches for the short-lived African turquoise killifish
A central challenge in experimental aging research is the lack of short-lived vertebrate models for genetic studies. Here we present a comprehensive protocol for efficient genome engineering in the African turquoise killifish (Nothobranchius furzeri), which is the shortest-lived vertebrate in captivity.

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July 25, 2016: INTENSE A Scientist Might Have Found the Fountain of Youth
Tony Wyss-Coray studies the impact of aging on the human body and brain. In this eye-opening talk, he shares new research from his Stanford lab and other teams which shows that a solution for some of the less great aspects of old age might actually lie within us all.

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July 20, 2016: Live fast, die young
Research into ageing requires patience, but a small cadre of scientists is angling to speed up answers by developing the flamboyant, short-lived turquoise killifish as a new model.

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rando_2June 22, 2016: A Niche New Way to Stay a Stem Cell
A Stanford University research group led by Dr. Thomas A. Rando sought to create an enhanced culture system for studying the biology of quiescence.

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rando_2June 21, 2016: Creative Minds: A New Chemistry for Aging Research?
Basic scientists have long studied aging by looking inside of cells. While this research has produced many important leads, they are now starting to look outside the cell for the wealth of biochemical clues contained in the bloodstream.

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rando_2May 31, 2016: Helping stem cells sleep can boost their power to heal
We are often told that sleep is one of the most important elements of a healthy lifestyle, that it helps in the healing and repair of our heart and blood vessels – among other things. It turns out that sleep, or something very similar, is equally important for stem cells.

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rando_2May 30, 2016: Artificial muscle fibers help keep muscle stem cells potent in lab
Artificial collagen-based muscle fibers and a specialized broth developed by Stanford researchers help muscle stem cells stay primed and ready for transplant.

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wyss-corayMay 6, 2016: Plasma Proteomics Study Hints at New Player in Alzheimer’s
Sifting plasma for hundreds of proteins that foster cell-to-cell communication, scientists led by Tony Wyss-Coray at Stanford University School of Medicine, California, appear to have fished out a heretofore unknown signaling pathway linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

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April 20, 2016: Uncovering New Players in the Fight Against Alzheimer’s
Research on a key brain immune cell suggests it is a tantalizing but slippery target for new therapies.

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Wyss-Coray2March 2, 2016: Ageing: Restoration project
Future generations may have less to fear from cognitive decline thanks to microscopic insights into the ageing brain, and interventions from unexpected quarters.

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