Arches. Photo by Daniel Chia
HOPES: Huntington's Outreach Project for Education, at Stanford
Jun
29
2010

Arginine

Arginine and Huntington’s Disease: Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins . In humans, they are either made in the body or they must be taken in from the proteins found in food. Recently, scientists have found that ingesting large amounts of the amino acid arginine has a marked effect on human brain chemistry. They hope that through investigating the way arginine interacts with the brain, they will find similarities in, and solutions to, the mental decline associated with age-related dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease.

Jun
26
2010

Dietary Restriction

Judging from common phrases like “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”, “people should eat whenever they are hungry”, and the recently popular “eat five small meals per day instead of three large ones,” public opinion seems to run against going hungry even for short periods of time. However, current research suggests that moderate hunger may actually be healthy. Scientists studying rats and mice on so-called “dietary restriction” have found that these rodents rank significantly better on various measures of health than their counterparts who are fed a more abundant diet.

Jun
26
2010

Stem Cells

In the last few years, stem cell research has become the latest buzz in the popular media as well as the scientific world. It was the subject of President George W. Bush’s first prime-time television address. It is continuously on the cover of popular news magazines. So what is all the fuss about? Stem cells [...]

Jun
26
2010

The Scientific Approach

When it comes to scientific research, the public wants results and we want them fast. This is especially true of research on chronic or fatal human diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson’s, which affect millions of people in the United States alone. Because the public loves good news, the media is quick to report [...]