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Research References
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1. GNOME Documentation Style Guide.


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36. LaDuc, L., Infusing Practical Wisdom into Persuasive Performance:Hermeneutics and the Teaching of Sales Proposal Writing. J. Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(2): p. 155-164.


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44. Mayer, R.E. and R.B. Anderson, The instructive animation: Helping students build connections between words and pictures in multimedia learning. Journal of Educational Psychology, 1992. 84(4): p. 444-452.


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47. McDonald, D., Commentary: Writing Brand Names. J. Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(2): p. 127-131.


48. McLeod, D., Truth, Territory and the Coffee Break: experiences of multidisciplinary research in education and training. 2000, SOCINET, CSSE, University of Alberta. p. 1-23.


49. McLeod, D., Truth, Territory and the Coffee Break: experiences of mutidisciplinary research in education and training. 2000, University of British Columbia: Vancouver.


50. McNair, J.R., Ancient memory arts and modern graphics. Journal of Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(3): p. 259-269.
51. McNair, J.R., Ancient Memory Arts and Modern Graphics. J. Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(2): p. 259-269.


52. Meehan, S. and J.A. Valentine, Research Champions: Translating Research and Reinventing Government Health Care. Science Communication, 1994. 16(1): p. 90-101.


53. Nissani, M., Ten Cheers for Interdisciplinarity: The Case for Interdisciplinary Knowledge and Research. Social Science Journal, 1997. 34(2): p. 201-216.


54. Nyquist, J.D., et al., The Development of Graduate Students as Teaching Scholars: A Four-Year Longitudinal Study. 2001, University of Washington, Michigan State University, San Jose State University. p. 1-6.


55. Nyquist, J.D., et al., On the Road to Becoming a Professor: the Graduate Student Experience, in Change. 1999. p. 18-27.


56. Ragsdale, A.R.a.R.G., A Process Perspective on Participation in Scholarly Electronic Forums. Science Communication, 1997. 18(4): p. 320-341.


57. Reif, F. and J.H. Larkin, Cognition in scientific and everyday domains: Comparison and learning implications. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 1991. 28(9): p. 733-760.


58. Rensberger, B., Report: Image and meaning conference. Science Communication, 2002. 23(2): p. 342-347.


59. Riley, K., Passive voice and rhetorical role in scientific writing. Journal of Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(3): p. 239-257.


60. Rodman, L., Anticipatory it in scientific discourse. Journal of Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(1): p. 17-27.


61. Rogers, E.M., The Nature of Technology Transfer. Science Communication, 2002. 23(3): p. 323-341.


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64. Rowan, K.E., Goals, obstacles, and strategies in risk communication: A problem-solving approach to improving communication about risks. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 1991. November: p. 300-329.


65. Rowan, K.E., When simple language fails: Presenting difficult science to the public. Journal of Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(4): p. 369-382.


66. Rukavina, I. and M. Daneman, Integration and its effect on acquiring knowledge about competing scientific theories from text. Journal of Educational Psychology, 1996. 88(2): p. 272-287.


67. Silverman, R.J., Contexts of Knowing: Their Shape and Substance. Knowledge: Creation, Diffusion, Utilization, 1993. 14(4): p. 372-385.
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69. Stafford, A. Using boundary-work theories in professional accounting development- explaining the creation and development of the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants. in Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Accounting Conference. 1997. University of Central England in Birmingham.


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71. Stephens, I.E., Citation Indexes Improve Bibliography in Technical Communication. Journal of Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(2): p. 117-125.


72. Thompson, I., The Speech Community in Technical Communication. J. Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(1): p. 41-54.


73. Thralls, C., Bridging Visual and Verbal Communication: Training Videos and Written Instructional Texts. J. Technical Writing and Communication, 1991. 21(3): p. 285-306.


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75. Trower, C.A., A.E. Austin, and M.D. Sorcinelli, Paradise Lost: How the academy converts enthusiastic recruits into early-career doubters. AAHEBulletin, 2001. 53(9): p. 3-6.


76. Trower, C.A., A.E. Austin, and M.D. Sorcinelli, Paradise Lost: How the academy converts enthusiastic recruits into early-career doubters. AAHEBulletin, 2001. 53(9): p. 3-6.


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