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April 19, 2007

April 30, 2007: A Public Symposium--Censuses and Surveys: Still Useful for the Common Good?

A symposium, open to the public, will feature a conversation between noted survey and census scholars Kenneth Prewitt and Henry Brady on Monday, April 30, 2007 from 4-6pm. Prewitt is the Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs at Columbia University and a former director of the U.S. Census Bureau. Brady is the Class of 1941 Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Stanford Political Science Professor Douglas Rivers will serve as the moderator. Location is the Jonsson Social Sciences Reading Room in the Green Library. The symposium is co-sponsored by IRiSS and the Social Sciences Resource Center of the Stanford University Libraries.

The flyer for the symposium can be downloaded at:
IRiSS Symposium

To reserve a seat or get additional information, please contact
IRiSS-info@Stanford.edu
or call (650) 724-5221

Posted by cthomsen at 02:04 PM

Do Surveys and Censuses Still Serve the Common Good?

A symposium, open to the public, will feature a conversation between noted survey and census scholars Kenneth Prewitt and Henry Brady on Monday, April 30, 2007 from 4-6pm. Prewitt is the Carnegie Professor of Public Affairs at Columbia University and a former director of the U.S. Census Bureau. Brady is the Class of 1941 Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at UC Berkeley. Stanford Political Science Professor Douglas Rivers will serve as the moderator. Location is the Jonsson Social Sciences Reading Room in the Green Library. The symposium is co-sponsored by IRiSS and the Social Sciences Resource Center of the Stanford University Libraries.

The flyer for the symposium can be downloaded at:
IRiSS Symposium

To reserve a seat or get additional information, please contact
IRiSS-info@Stanford.edu
or call (650) 724-5221

Posted by cthomsen at 01:50 PM

April 18, 2007

PhD Fellowship Applications Invited by the PACS Center

The Stanford Center for Research on Philanthropy and Civil Society seeks to increase and enhance research on philanthropy and civil society. We also seek to apply analyses of these activities and institutions speak to core research questions in the social sciences, as well as the professional schools. To pursue these goals, the Center offers PhD fellowships, support for undergraduates writing honor’s theses, and supports PhD seminars and workshops. The Center is located administratively in the Institute for Research on the Social Sciences, and physically in the Haas Center for Public Service.

Eligibility: Second year PhD students and beyond, pre-or post-dissertation proposal stage, are eligible. Students will be expected to begin the year with a well-defined research project to carry out during their fellowship year. We welcome proposals from the social sciences, the humanities, and professional schools.

Research Topics: The Center encourages applications from students studying the leading institutions and activities that are defining civil society, particularly the interaction between funding sources, nonprofit and nongovernmental organizations. Students may explore a range of themes dealing with comparative institutional analysis (the assessment of alternative arrangements - be they public, private, and nonprofit – for the provision of a service or good); the effects of different forms of financial support on the ability of nonprofit or nongovernmental organizations to effectively work with communities; and the role of nongovernmental organizations in non-Western nations. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

• The efficacy of philanthropy - - in contrast to the market or the state - - in responding to crises, such as famine, natural disasters, or civil wars;
• The role of civil society organizations in political advocacy and policy making, and their consequences for democratic governance;
• The role of new technologies in facilitating forms of civic participation in either the developed or developing world;
• The effects of intermediary organizations (consulting firms, advocacy groups, international donors) on both funders and nonprofit organizations;
• The effects of funder priorities on the activities and direction of nonprofit and public institutions.

Funding and Expectations: The fellowship would provide up to a full year of support - - stipend and tuition, and health insurance - - for PhD students. We anticipate that we will offer three or four fellowships in 2007-08. Please note the fellowship does not support travel or data collection.

All recipients are expected to participate in a year-long research workshop that meets on Friday afternoons (2-4:30) every other week throughout the school year. The seminar will be open to PhD students from all over campus, in addition to fellowship recipients, undergraduate seniors writing honor’s theses, faculty, and visiting scholars. Fellowship recipients will be expected to complete a writing project during their fellowship year, and required to turn that work into scholarly articles for academic journals within two years of receipt of the fellowship.

Application Process: The application form may be downloaded at: http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/philancivilsociety/PACSFellowships.doc

The deadline for application is June 15, 2007. Notification will be made in mid-July.

Faculty Steering Committee of the Center:

• Steve Barley, Management Science and Engineering
• Larry Diamond, Institute for International Studies and Hoover Institute
• Doug McAdam, Sociology and Urban Studies
• Debra Meyerson, School of Education, and Graduate School of Business, co-director
• Milbrey McLaughlin, School of Education
• Leonard Ortolano, Civil Engineering
• Walter W. Powell, School of Education, and (by courtesy) Sociology, Graduate School of Business, School of Engineering, and Communication, co-director
• Rob Reich, Political Science
• Bruce Seivers, the Haas Center

Posted by cthomsen at 10:28 AM

April 10, 2007

Race, Inequality and Incarceration Summit

On Wednesday, April 11, IRiSS will co-host a summit addressing the causes, meanings, and effects of racial disproportion in the American criminal justice system with a focus on massive incarceration and racial disproportion in American prisons and jails.

Panelists include: Stanford Law Professor Robert Weisberg, director of the Criminal Justice Center; Stanford Professor of Sociology Lawrence Bobo; Stanford Associate Professor of Psychology Jennifer Eberhardt; and Theodore M. Shaw, director-counsel and president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

To see the full agenda and to register for the conference, go to:

http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/conferences/rii.html

Posted by cthomsen at 03:05 PM

April 11, 2007: Conference on Race, Inequality, and Incarceration

The Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, The Institute for Research in the Social Sciences,
The Stanford Criminal Justice Center, and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality present:

Race, Inequality, and Incarceration

An intellectual summit addressing the causes, meanings, and effects of racial disproportion in the American criminal justice system with a focus on massive incarceration and racial disproportion in American prisons and jails.

The Bechtel Conference Center, Stanford University
April 11, 2007

More information can be found at:
http://www.stanford.edu/group/iriss/conferences/rii.html

Posted by vijoy at 10:36 AM