Ummah Tamir-e-Nau

FormedJune 2000
Disbanded2002
UpdatedJuly 19, 2012

Narrative Summary

Ummah Tameer-e-Nau (UTN) referred to itself "an organisation engaged in relief, rehabilitation and reconstruction activities".[1][2] Founded in June 2000 by retired Pakistani nuclear scientist, Sultan Bashiruddin Mahmood of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), UTN's declared objective was to bring foreign investment, especially from Muslim countries, to Afghanistan.

After its formation, UTN carried out relief and reconstruction activities in Afghanistan.[3] Some of its projects included rebuilding schools, hospitals, providing medical supplies, land development, education reforms, provision of mobile health units and primary school course books.[4]

While at PAEC, Mahmood publicly voiced the view that Pakistan's nuclear capability was property of the global Muslim community and thus needed to be shared.[5] He also openly differed with Pakistan's arms control policy, calling for proliferation of nuclear technology to other Muslim countries. His ties to Islamist organizations had been known while he served at the PAEC, leading to his demotion and eventual resignation from the organization in 1998. 

In October 2001, U.S. intelligence found that Mahmood and Chaudry Abdul Majeed, a senior UTN member and former scientist at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, had been meeting with Al Qaeda leaders in Afghanistan to discuss nuclear weapons technology.[6][7] According to reports, the two former scientists met with Osama bin Laden, his Egyptian deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri and other Al Qaeda members. 

UTN also sought to provide nuclear technology to other Muslim countries. According to Libyan Intelligence, UTN approached Libya with an offer of help "build a nuclear bomb."[8] 

These activities were cut short in October 2001, when under U.S. pressure, ISI arrested Mahmood, Majeed, and several other members of the UTN.[9] Subsequently the Government of Pakistan banned the group in 2002.[10] UTN was also listed as a foreign terrorist organization by the United States and the United Nations in December 2001.[11]

Leadership

Before forming UTN in June 2000, Mahmood served as a Director General at the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC), a position from which he resigned in 1998 after being demoted for his fundamentalist views. Mahmood was arrested by the ISI in Islamabad on October 23, 2001, along with his associate Chaudry Abdul Majeed for links to Al Qaeda.

  1. Sultan Bashiruddin Mahmood (March 2000 to October 2001): Mahmood was the founder and head of UTN.[12]

Ideology & Goals

UTN's stated goal was to attract foreign investment, particularly from Muslim countries, to Afghanistan to rebuild thr country's infrastructure and develop Taliban-held areas of Afghanistan.[13] 

UTN also sought to provide assistance for the development of nuclear, biological, and chemichal weapons to the Taliban and other Muslim countries.[14]

Designated/Listed

UTN has been listed as a foreign terrorist organization by the United States and the United Nations since late December 2001.[15][16]

Resources

UTN funded operations with donations by its members.[17]  Its founder, Bashiruddin Mahmood, and his associate, Abdul Majeed, reportedly donated their retirement funds of about 1 million rupees or $14,000 to finance the group initially. [18]  The two also used their personal power and prestige to solicit the aforementioned donations.  The group has been linked with Al Rashid Trust, a charity group, which is also on the U.S. terrorist watch list. [19]  Affiliates of the group may have traded stock to finance the group as well. [20]

External Influences

The Taliban government supported and facilitated UTN's operations in Afghanistan, and allegedly sponsored visas for UTN members to Afghanistan.[21]  

UTN was also influenced by Al Qaeda's transnational jihad agenda.[22] The groups' relationship was made evident by UTN's attempt to provide Al Qaeda with assistance in the development of nuclear technology.

Geographical Locations

Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Targets & Tactics

UTN aimed to assist in the development and provision of nuclear technology and other high tech weapons to the Taliban, Al Qaeda, and other Muslim countries.  In October 2001, Mahmood along with another senior UTN member, Chaudry Abdul Majeed, had been meeting with Al Qaeda leaders in Afghanistan to discuss nuclear weapons technology.[23]  According to reports, the two former scientists met with Osama bin Laden, his Egyptian deputy Ayman al-Zawahiri and other Al Qaeda members.  According to Libyan Intelligence, UTN approached Libya with an offer of help "build a nuclear bomb."'[24]

Relationships with Other Groups

UTN was affiliated with the now-proscribed Al Rashid Trust.[25] 

UTN had a strategic affiliation with Al Qaeda, working to support the group in developing nuclear and other high tech weapons.[26] 

UTN reportedly had the personal support of Mullah Omar and close ties to the Taliban regime.[27][28] Founder Mahmood supported the Taliban regime, describing it as "the ideal Islamic state."[29]

The former director of Pakistan's intelligence services, Hamid Gul, admits to being a member of the group. [30]

Community Relationships

UTN's membership base consisted of educated, middle class Pakistanis who worked as engineers, physicists, chemists, former military and intelligence officials.[31]


References

  1. ^ "Ummah Tamir-e-Nau." SATP (n.d.). http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/UTN.htm.
  2. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  3. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  4. ^ "Ummah Tamir-e-Nau." SATP (n.d.). http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/UTN.htm.
  5. ^ "International Institute for Strategic Studies Pakistan's nuclear oversight reforms", n.d. http://www.iiss.org/publications/strategic-dossiers/nbm/nuclear-black-market-dossier-a-net-assesment/pakistans-nuclear-oversight-reforms/.
  6. ^ "Security Council Committee established pursuant to Resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and Associated Individuals and Entities", n.d. http://www.un.org/sc/committees/1267/NSQE06801E.shtml.
  7. ^ "International Institute for Strategic Studies Pakistan's nuclear oversight reforms", n.d. http://www.iiss.org/publications/strategic-dossiers/nbm/nuclear-black-market-dossier-a-net-assesment/pakistans-nuclear-oversight-reforms/.
  8. ^ "International Institute for Strategic Studies Pakistan's nuclear oversight reforms", n.d. http://www.iiss.org/publications/strategic-dossiers/nbm/nuclear-black-market-dossier-a-net-assesment/pakistans-nuclear-oversight-reforms/.
  9. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  10. ^ "Security Council Committee established pursuant to Resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and Associated Individuals and Entities", n.d. http://www.un.org/sc/committees/1267/NSQE06801E.shtml.
  11. ^ "Ummah Tameer E-Nau (UTN)." US Department of the Treasury, n.d. http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/terrorist-illicit-finance/Pages/protecting-charities_execorder_13224-p.aspx#u.
  12. ^ Rohde, Douglas Frantz With David. "A NATION CHALLENGED: BIOLOGICAL TERROR; 2 Pakistanis Linked to Papers on Anthrax Weapons." The New York Times, November 28, 2001, sec. World. http://www.nytimes.com/2001/11/28/world/nation-challenged-biological-terror-2-
  13. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  14. ^ "Security Council Committee established pursuant to Resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and Associated Individuals and Entities
  15. ^ "Security Council Committee established pursuant to Resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and Associated Individuals and Entities", n.d. http://www.un.org/sc/committees/1267/NSQE06801E.shtml.
  16. ^ "Ummah Tameer E-Nau (UTN)." US Department of the Treasury, n.d. http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/terrorist-illicit-finance/Pages/protecting-charities_execorder_13224-p.aspx#u.
  17. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  18. ^ "Ummah Tamir-e-Nau." SATP (n.d.). http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/UTN.htm.
  19. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  20. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  21. ^ "Ummah Tamir-e-Nau." SATP (n.d.). http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/UTN.htm.
  22. ^ "Security Council Committee established pursuant to Resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and Associated Individuals and Entities", n.d. http://www.un.org/sc/committees/1267/NSQE06801E.shtml.
  23. ^ "Ummah Tamir-e-Nau." SATP (n.d.). http://www.satp.org/satporgtp/countries/pakistan/terroristoutfits/UTN.htm.
  24. ^ "International Institute for Strategic Studies Pakistan's nuclear oversight reforms", n.d. http://www.iiss.org/publications/strategic-dossiers/nbm/nuclear-black-market-dossier-a-net-assesment/pakistans-nuclear-oversight-reforms/.
  25. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  26. ^ Albright, David, and Holly Higgins. "How Much Nuclear Assistance to Al Qaeda?" Institute for Science and International Security (n.d.). http://www.exportcontrols.org/pakscientists.html.
  27. ^ "Security Council Committee established pursuant to Resolution 1267 (1999) concerning Al-Qaida and the Taliban and Associated Individuals and Entities", n.d. http://www.un.org/sc/committees/1267/NSQE06801E.shtml.
  28. ^ "Ummah Tameer E-Nau (UTN)." US Department of the Treasury, n.d. http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/terrorist-illicit-finance/Pages/protecting-charities_execorder_13224-p.aspx#u.
  29. ^ Tempest, Ron. "Pakistan Nuclear Expert Recalls Detention." LA Times, November 12, 2001. http://articles.latimes.com/2001/nov/12/news/mn-3248.
  30. ^ Rondeaux, Candace. "Former Pakistani Intelligence Official Denies Aiding Group Tied to Mumbai Siege." Washington Post, 2008. Available at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/08/AR2008120803612.html
  31. ^ Rohde, Douglas Frantz With David. "A NATION CHALLENGED: BIOLOGICAL TERROR; 2 Pakistanis Linked to Papers on Anthrax Weapons." The New York Times, November 28, 2001, sec. World. http://www.nytimes.com/2001/11/28/world/nation-challenged-biological-terror-2-pakistanis-linked-papers-anthrax-weapons.html.

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