International Islamic Peacekeeping Brigade

Formed1998
Disbanded2003
First AttackAugust 1999: The IIPB led forces into to Dagestan, a move that ultimately started the Second Chechen War. (Unknown killed) [1]
Last AttackOctober 26, 2002: IIPB collaborated with Riyadus-Salikhin and SPIR on an attack on Moscow's Dubrovka theatre. They held over 800 people hostage and threatening to kill them if the Russian Federation did not recognize Chechnya's independence. Russian security forces were able to release the hostages and SPIR's leader, Movsar Suleimanov Barayev, was killed. (130-140 killed, Unknown wounded) [2]
UpdatedFebruary 19, 2014

Narrative Summary

Chechen rebel Shamil Basayev and Ibn Al-Khattab, a Saudi Arabian mujahiden, founded the International Islamic Peacekeeping Brigade in 1998. IIPB worked closely with the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, the Special Purpose Islamic Regiment (SPIR), and Riyadus-Salikhin to wage war against the Russian Federation and the West. [3]

The group aimed to establish an independent Chechnya under Shariah and, eventually, to liberate other parts of the North Caucasus. Al Qaeda (AQ) financiers worked closely with IIPB because it served as a liaison between AQ and other terrorist groups in the region. [4]

IIn 2006, the armed forces of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria absorbed the group, along with SPIR. Throughout the group’s existence, the leaders of IIPB were of Arab origin. This helped to integrate foreign, mostly Arab fighters in the North Caucasus into a single organization. [5]

Leadership

  1. Ibn Al-Khattab (1998 to 2002): Saudi Arabian mujahiden and the founder and leader of IIPB until his death in 2002. Khattab worked alongside Chechen rebel Shamil Basayev to lead numerous attacks against the Russian Federation and Western forces.[6]
  2. Shamil Basayev (1998 to 2006): Chechen rebel and the founder and leader of IIPB, amongst other terrorist organizations. [7]
  3. Abu Al-Walid (2002 to 2004): A Saudi-born Arab who became the leader of IIPB after Khattab's death. He remained leader until his death at the hands of Russian security forces in 2004.[8]
  4. Abu Hafs Al-Urduni (2004 to 2006): Jordanian born leader of IIPB after Abu Al-Walid's death in 2004[9]

Ideology & Goals

The International Islamic Peacekeeping Brigade (IIPB) was an Islamic fundamentalist group which aimed to create an independent Chechnya under Shariah. Over time, IIPB widened the scope of its activities to include combat in other areas of the North Caucasus. The group advocated armed resistance against the West, namely the Russia Federation, and the creation of an Islamic emirate under Shariah. [10].

Size Estimates

Designated/Listed

The U.S. Secretary of State listed IIPB as a terrorist entity in February of 2003 under Executive Order 13224. [12] Soon after, the UN listed IIPB as a terrorist organization in March 2003. [13]. In December 2004, the U.S. Department of State included IIPB in the Terrorist Exclusion list. [14] 


United States of America: February  2003 to Present
United Nations: March 04, 2003 to Present


Resources

Members of Al Qaeda (AQ) founded and lead IIPB and AQ financiers worked closely with the group, which it served as a conduit to the other terrorist groups in the North Caucasus. [15]

External Influences

IIPB worked closely with other terrorist groups in the North Caucasus like Riyadus-Salikhin, Special Purpose Islamic Regiment (SPIR), the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria and Al Qaeda. These groups influenced and collaborated with IIPB because they shared both members and leaders, such as Shamil Basayev and Ibn al-Khattab, and because they were fighting for the same goals: independence from the Russian Federation under Shariah. [16] 

Targets & Tactics

Suicide bombings became one of IIPB's main tactics due to the strong influence of Al Qaeda, which trained members of IIPB to execute such attacks. They also used kidnappings for ransom and hostage-taking to fight the Russian Federation. [17]

Major Attacks

  1. August 1999: Dagestan: The IIPB led forces into to Dagestan, ultimately sparking the Second Chechen War. ((Casualties Unknown) ).[18]
  2. October 26, 2002: Moscow, Russia: IIPB conducted an attack on Moscow's Dubrovka theatre. It collaborated with other terrorist groups from the North Caucasus to hold over 800 people hostage. The terrorists demanded that Russia recognize the independence of Chechnya and remove all Russian security forces from the region. They threatened to kill the hostages if their demands were not met. ((130-140 killed, unknown wounded) ).[19]

Relationships with Other Groups

IIPB had a strong relationship with Al Qaeda. The group was originally founded by a member of Al Qaeda and all of the subsequent leaders were also members of Al Qaeda. 

IIPB also collaborated with other groups in the North Caucasus like the Republic of Ichkeria, Riyadus-Salikhin, and Special Purpose Islamic Regiment (SPIR) to launch attacks against the Russian Federation. They also shared members with these other Chechen groups and were incorporated into the armed forces of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria in 2006. [20]


References

  1. ^ "Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism." Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism. University of Maryland
  2. ^ Leung, Rebecca. "Terror In Moscow." CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 11 Feb. 2009. Web. July 2012. <http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-18560_162-579840.html>.
  3. ^ "Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism." Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism. University of Maryland
  4. ^ Vidino, Lorenzo. "How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism." How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism. N.p., 2005. Web. June 2012. <http://www.investigativeproject.org/268/how-chechnya-became-a-breeding-ground-for-terror>.
  5. ^ Bhattacharji, Preeti. "Council on Foreign Relations." Council on Foreign Relations. Council on Foreign Relations, 08 Apr. 2010. Web. May 2012. <http://www.cfr.org/terrorism/chechen-terrorism-russia-chechnya-separatist/p9181>.
  6. ^ Vidino, Lorenzo. "How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism." How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism. N.p., 2005. Web. June 2012. <http://www.investigativ
  7. ^ Vidino, Lorenzo. "How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism." How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism. N.p., 2005. Web. June 2012.
  8. ^ Vidino, Lorenzo. "How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism." How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism. N.p., 2005. Web. June 2012.
  9. ^ "Homeland Security." Abu Hafs Al-Urduni. Global Security, n.d. Web. June 2012. .
  10. ^ "Appendix C: Background Information on Terrorist Groups." US State Department. US Department of State, 2003. Web. <www.state.gov/documents/organization/31947.pdf>.
  11. ^ "Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism." Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism. University of Marylan
  12. ^ "Appendix C: Background Information on Terrorist Groups." US State Department. US Department of State, 2003. Web. <www.state.gov/documents/organization/31947.pdf>.
  13. ^ "SECURITY COUNCIL COMMITTEE ADDS NAMES OF THREE ENTITIES TO CONSOLIDATED LIST." UN News Center. UN, 03 Apr. 2003. Web. June 2012. <http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs/2003/sc7676.doc.htm>..
  14. ^ "Terrorist Exclusion List." U.S. Department of State. U.S. Department of State, 29 Dec. 2004. Web. July 2012. <http://www.state.gov/j/ct/rls/other/des/123086.htm>.
  15. ^ Vidino, Lorenzo. "How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism." How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism. N.p., 2005. Web. June 2012. <http://www.investigativeproject.org/268/how-chechnya-became-a-breeding-ground-for-terror>.
  16. ^ Bhattacharji, Preeti. "Council on Foreign Relations." Council on Foreign Relations. Council on Foreign Relations, 08 Apr. 2010. Web. May 2012. <http://www.cfr.org/terrorism/chechen-terrorism-russia-chechnya-separatist/p9181>.
  17. ^ Vidino, Lorenzo. "How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism." How Chechnya Became a Breeding Ground for Terror :: The Investigative Project on Terrorism. N.p., 2005. Web. June 2012. <http://www.investigativeproject.org/268/how-chechnya-became-a-breeding-ground-for-terror>.
  18. ^ "Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism." Terrorist Organization Profile - START - National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism. University of Marylan
  19. ^ Leung, Rebecca. "Terror In Moscow." CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 11 Feb. 2009. Web. July 2012. .
  20. ^ Moore, Cerwyn. "The Radicalisation of the Chechen Separatist Movement: Myth or Reality?" WebCite Query Result. Prague Watchdog, 16 May 2007. Web. July 2012. <http://www.webcitation.org/5zi2iyMcD>.

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