2011-12 Events

  • Film Screening: The Other Town
    10 May 2012 at 17:30 in Annenberg Auditorium (Cummings Art Building, 435 Lasuen Mall)

    Film Screening with Director Nefin Dinç (State University of New York at Fredonia). Why do neighbors fight? Why do the world’s ethnic amd religious groups experience mutual hatred and suspicion? “The Other Town" (2011, 45 minutes, in Turkish & Greek with English Subtitles)” explores how the inhabitants in Dimitsana (Greece) and Birgi (Turkey) are caught in a web of stereotypes that impedes bilateral relationships between Turkey and Greece. Interviewing the inhabitants during the span of a year, directors Nefin Dinc and Hercules Millas illustrate the turbulent relations between the two countries exist not so much due to their contentious past, but also due to the influence of nationalist ideology on higher education system and everyday life. [Co-sponsored by the Europe Center]

  • Denis Cohen-Tannoudji: North African Jewry
    03 May 2012 at 16:00 in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall (424 Santa Teresa)

    As part of the 2012 event series on "Negotiating French, Maghreb-French and Jewish Identities Through Literature and History", Denis Cohen-Tannoudji (Société d'Histoire des Juifs de Tunisie) will present "The Cohen-Tanoudji Family: A Historical Itinerary Through North African Jewry." The series seeks to enhance a new dialogue between different plural voices writing about multiple Jewish identities originating from France and the Maghreb. It specially focuses on conflicting and co-existing identities and the ways in which they are presented in literature and history. The series aims to look beyond the much discussed hybrid identity of widely translated writers and scholars, and present a more inclusive, rich, and complex perspective on the unique interplay between Jewish, French and/or Maghreb identities.

  • Saskia Sassen: Expulsions
    02 May 2012 at 16:30 in Encina Hall Central, CISAC Conference Room(616 Serra Street)

    In the last two decades there has been a sharp growth in the numbers of people that have been “expelled,” numbers far larger than the newly “incorporated” middle classes of countries such as India and China. I use the term “expulsion” to describe a diversity of conditions: the growing numbers of the abjectly poor, of the displaced in poor countries who are warehoused in formal and informal refugee camps, of the minoritized and persecuted in rich countries who are warehoused in prisons, of workers whose bodies are destroyed on the job and rendered useless at far too young an age, able-bodied surplus populations warehoused in ghettoes and slums. One major trend is the repositioning of what had been framed as sovereign territory, a complex conditions, into land for sale on the global market – land in Sub-Saharan Africa, in Central Asia and in Latin America to be bought by rich investors and rich governments to grow food, to access underground water tables, and to access minerals and metals. My argument is that these diverse and many other kindred developments amount to a logic of expulsion, signaling a deeper systemic transformation in advanced capitalism, one documented in bits and pieces but not quite narrated as an overarching dynamic that is taking us into a new phase of global capitalism. [Co-sponsored by the Europe Center and the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies]

  • Pantelis Lekkas: The Greek War of Independence
    17 April 2012 at 16:30 in Encina Hall Central, CISAC Conference Room (616 Serra Street)

    This lecture aims to situate the Greek War of Independence in the wider context of the clash between Tradition and Modernity in the European periphery. Focusing on the emergence of nationalism as a movement and an ideology, I explore the Greek War of Independence in terms of both its political dimensions and also its contribution to a much broader societal change. I argue that the Greek struggle for independence may be interpreted as a ‘Greek exit’ from tradition. In this respect, on the one hand, it constitutes an undoubtedly unique event of momentous importance per se, and yet, on the other hand, another instance of a prolonged and very intricate process of societal transformation.

  • Sebouh Aslanian: From the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean
    16 April 2012 at 16:15 in Lane History Corner, Room 305 (450 Serra Mall)

    David Sebouh Aslanian (University of California, Los Angeles), “From the Indian Ocean to the Mediterranean: The Global Trade Networks of Armenian Merchants from New Julfa” [Co-sponsored by the Department of History, the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, and the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies]

  • Ioannis Grigoriadis: Greek-Turkish Relations
    09 April 2012 at 16:30 in Encina Hall Central, CISAC Conference Room (616 Serra Street)

    Ioannis Grigoriadis (Bilkent University), “The Unripe Fruits of Rapprochement: Greek-Turkish Relations and the Cyprus Question in the post-Helsinki Era.” This lecture will present an overview of Greek-Turkish rapprochement since December 1999. Despite significant improvements at the level of economic, energy cooperation and minority rights, no breakthrough has been achieved on high-political issues and the intractable Cyprus question has remained the biggest burden to any reconciliation attempt. Greece’s mounting economic and social crisis and Turkey’s new foreign policy activism can pose additional obstacles to the resolution of longstanding disputes, absent determined leadership on both sides.

  • Negotiating French, Maghreb-French and Jewish Identities
    21 March 2012 at 16:00 in Stanford Humanities Center, Levinthal Hall

    MAURICE SAMUELS (Yale University), “Fictions of Jewish Identity in Nineteenth-Century France” EMANUELA TREVISAN SEMI (Ca' Foscari University, Italy), “Do Moroccans Share Nostalgia of the Jews from Morocco for a Mystical Past?: Sharing and Unsharing Narratives about Jews-Muslims Relationships in Morocco” As part of the 2012 event series on "Negotiating French, Maghreb-French and Jewish Identities Through Literature and History", the discussion session seeks to enhance a new dialogue between different plural voices writing about multiple Jewish identities originating from France and the Maghreb. The series aims to look beyond the much discussed hybrid identity of widely translated writers and scholars, and present a more inclusive, rich, and complex perspective on the unique interplay between Jewish, French and/or Maghreb identities.

  • Ozgen Felek: The Making of Imperial Men in the Early-modern Ottoman Court
    08 March 2012 at 12:15

    Religious Studies Colloquium (Open only to Stanford Faculty, Researchers and Graduate Students. RSVP: toy@stanford.edu).Dr. Ozgen Felek is Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Religious Studies. She received her first Ph.D. from Firat University in Turkey, in classical Ottoman poetry with a focus on the Sebk-i Hindi (Indian Style) poetical movement (2007), and her second Ph.D. from the Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of Michigan with emphasis on Ottoman dream culture and Sufism (2010). She is the co-editor of Victoria R. Holbrook’a Armagan (KANAT, 2006), which is a collection of essays in honor of Victoria Rowe Holbrook. She is also the co-editor of forthcoming Dreams and Visions in Islamic Societies (SUNY, 2012). In addition to her academic pursuits, Özgen is a miniaturist and illuminationist.

  • Cemal Kafadar: Is There A New Ottoman History?
    28 February 2012 at 18:00 in Stanford Humanities Center

    The Ethnic Minorities, Religious Communities, Rights,and Democracy in the Modern Middle East and Central Asia Workshop Series (Open only to Stanford Affiliates. RSVP )Cemal Kafadar is Vehbi Koc Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. from the McGill University Institute of Islamic Studies and taught for two years in Princeton's Near Eastern studies department before coming to Harvard. His research focuses on social and cultural history of the Middle East and Southeastern Europe in the early modern era. Among his publications are "The Question of Ottoman Decline" (in Harvard Middle East and Islamic Review, 1999), Between Two Worlds: The Construction of the Ottoman State (1995), and Suleiman the Second and His Time (1993).

  • Cemal Kafadar: The Changing Measure of Leisure and Pleasure in Early Modern Istanbul
    27 February 2012 at 16:15 in Lane History Corner, Room 307

    The Byzantine and Ottoman Worlds Workshop Series Cemal Kafadar is Vehbi Koc Professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. from the McGill University Institute of Islamic Studies and taught for two years in Princeton's Near Eastern studies department before coming to Harvard. His research focuses on social and cultural history of the Middle East and Southeastern Europe in the early modern era. Among his publications are "The Question of Ottoman Decline" (in Harvard Middle East and Islamic Review, 1999), Between Two Worlds: The Construction of the Ottoman State (1995), and Suleiman the Second and His Time (1993).

  • Ilker Ayturk: Paradoxes of a Turkish Sufi Woman
    22 February 2012 at 12:00 in Encina Central, Philippines Room (616 Serra Street)

    Focusing on the influence of Sâmiha Ayverdi on the renaissance of right-wing politics in Turkey, this lecture aims to uncover the multiplicity and complexity of Islamic identities and also to reassess the concept of conservatism in contemporary Turkey. Specifically, how could a woman impose herself as an authority on a male-dominated, conservative, Muslim audience? How could a militantly Muslim woman play a leading role in a Muslim mystical brotherhood, while she was the living example of an emancipated, westernized and unveiled Turkish woman? How could she claim to speak from inside Turkish conservatism, which has a populist and egalitarian dimension that challenges elitism of the Kemalist establishment, while she constructs an elitism of her own?

  • Reşat Kasaba: Migration and State Formation in the Aftermath of the Ottoman Empire
    15 February 2012 at 16:45 in Encina Hall Central, CISAC Conference Room

    Reşat Kasaba will sign copies of his A Moveable Empire: Ottoman Nomads, Migrants, and Refugees (University of Washington Press, 2009) at 16:45 pm. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event. The lecture will commence at 17:15 pm. His lecture will focus on how the Ottoman Empire started and ended in migration. While the movements of people that shaped the empire and its boundaries in the early part of its history were, to a large extent, voluntary, those that marked the end of the Ottoman Empire were compulsory. Multi-ethnic and multi-religious communities of the empire all around the empire were torn apart and almost the entire non-Muslim population of the empire were deported, killed, or marginalized as minorities. My presentation compares the early and later types of migration, explains the forces that brought the shift from the first to the second, and describes how these developments affected the status of the Greek population of Anatolia in the early decades of the 20th century.

  • Populations Exchanges in the Modern Era
    08 February 2012 at 17:00 in Levinthal Hall, Humanities Center

    Roundtable Discussion with Matthew Frank (Leeds University) and Catherine Gousseff (CNRS). The roundtable engages the causes, courses and consequences of the policy of mass population exchanges that have shaped the political and ethnographic boundaries of modern Eurasia. The session will be moderated by Norman Naimark (Stanford University) and Amir Weiner (Stanford University).

  • Hillel Cohen: Jerusalem in Palestinian-Arab and Israeli-Jewish Identities
    01 February 2012 at 12:00 in Building 360, Conference Room

    Hillel Cohen is Research Fellow in the Harry S. Truman Institute for the Advancement of Peace at Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research focuses on Jewish-Arab relations in Palestine/Israel with special respect to the Palestinian internal refugees and the 1948 War. He is the author of Good Arabs: The Israeli Security Services and the Israeli Arabs (University of California Press, 2010), Army of Shadows, Palestinian Collaboration with Zionism, 1917-1948 (University of California Press, 2008), and Present Absentees: Palestinian Refugees in Israel Since 1948 (The Institute for Palestine Studies, 2003).

  • Roundtable on Minorities in the Middle East
    31 January 2012 at 12:00 in Lane History Corner, Room 307 (450 Serra Mall)

    A Roundtable Discussion on Minorities in the Middle East with Hillel Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), “Israeli Arabs and the Quest for Equality” Ali Yaycioglu (Stanford University), “Inclusion, Exclusion and the Crisis of (Co-)existence: The End of Republicanism in Turkey.”

  • Seth Kimmel: The Legibility of Ritual
    08 December 2011 at 12:15 in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Seth Kimmel is Postdoctoral Fellow in Stanford University's Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities and the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures. He earned his B.A. in Comparative Literature and Religion from Columbia University and his Ph.D. from the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. His current book project, Erasing the Difference, argues that early modern Iberian debates about the narratives, rituals, and languages shared among Old Christians and religious minorities in the Hispanic World transformed the fields of theology and philology. His other research interests include the cultural and historical legacy of al-Andalus, Mediterranean Studies, the history of cartography, manuscript and early print culture, and Cervantes.

  • Thanos Veremis: Nationalism in Greece and Turkey
    26 October 2011 at 16:30 in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    Thanos Veremis is Professor Emeritus of Political History in the Department of European and International Studies at the University of Athens and Founding Member of the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP). He has held teaching and research positions at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (London), Harvard University’s Center for European Studies, Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, St. Antony's College (Oxford), the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and the Hellenic Observatory of the LSE. From 2004 to 2010, he served as President of Greece’s National Council for Education.

  • David Wacks: Ethnic Polemic in Medieval Spain
    13 October 2011 at 12:15 in Encina Hall West, Rm. 208

    David Wacks is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Oregon. His research focuses on the confluence of Romance, Hebrew, and Arabic literary cultures in Medieval Spain. His book, Framing Iberia: Maqamat and Frametale Narratives in Medieval Spain (Brill, 2007), is a study of the intersection of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism as reflected in story collections written in Castilian, Catalan, Latin, Hebrew, and Arabic. His current research project is Double Diaspora in Sephardic Literature (1200-1600), bridging pre- and post-1492 literary practice.

  • Burcu Karahan-Richardson: Turkish Film Screening
    12 October 2011 at 19:00 in Building 260, Rm. 113

    Screening of "Turkish Pop Cinema" (2005) and "Tarkan vs. the Vikings" (1971) and discussion with Burçu Karahan-Richardson (Stanford University). "Turkish Pop Cinema" is a documentary on popular Turkish films of the 1960s and 1970s, and "Tarkan vs. the Vikings" (1971), a cult classic and an adaptation of an extremely popular comic book series by Burak Sezgin.Screening is free and open to public.

  • Turkish Film Poster Art Exhibit
    03 October 2011 at

    This exhibit will showcase rare, yet highly sought-after, hand-drawn film posters from the collection of Stanford Libraries and Academic Information Resources. Dating back to the early 1950s, the posters highlight foreign adaptations and imitations, Western and Eastern influence, and representations of gender, minority, or majority. The exhibit is co-sponsored by the Mediterranean Studies Forum, the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, Stanford Institute for Creativity and the Arts, and Stanford Libraries and Academic Information Resources. Programming is partially made possible by the support of the Turkish Cultural Foundation, Stanford Division of Literatures, Cultures and Languages, and Stanford Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies.