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Quantum transport for future nano-CMOS

Studying quantum transport for future nano-CMOS applications: a look at the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) and beyond

The NNIN/C at Stanford University hosted a presentation on "Studying quantum transport for future nano-CMOS applications: a look at the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) and beyond" by Dr. William Vandenberghe. The talk was also broadcasted live as a web based seminar.

The presentation slides are available to download .

 

Event Information:
Topic: Studying quantum transport for future nano-CMOS applications: a look at the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) and beyond
Date: October 25th, 2013
Time: 10:00 am – 11:00 pm PST.

Presenter: Dr. William Vandenberghe
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Texas at Dallas

Click here for the Webinar Flyer.

Abstract:

After decades of scientific and technological development to fabricate ever smaller, faster and more energy efficient MOSFETs, reducing MOSFET power consumption is becoming increasingly difficult. As a possible successor to the MOSFET, the tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) has been proposed. We study the working principle of the TFET and go beyond the semiclassical models towards a fully quantum mechanical modeling of the TFET, which has band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) as its working principle. Furthermore, we look at the potential use of topological insulators for nano-electronic applications.
Semiclassical analytical models describing the two different tunneling components in a TFETs: point tunneling and line tunneling will be discussed, as well as improvements of the BTBT modeling in direct semiconductors such as graphene, III-V semiconductors as well as germanium, which is found to behave as a direct semiconductor in TFETs. A general formalism to study BTBT in indirect semiconductors will be presented to demonstrate the impact of field-induced quantum confinement in TFETs, namely large shifts in onset voltages and deteriorated subthreshold slopes compared to semiclassical models. Furthermore, a model for optimal doping of the tunnel FET and a good figure of merit to asses the performance of TFETs will be discussed. We conclude with a novel promising 2D topological insulator consisting of a single layer of tin which we refer to as "stannanane" and discuss its properties and its possible use in future nano-electronics.

Bio:

William Vandenberghe received the M.Sc. degree (magna cum laude) in Electrical Engineering from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (K.U. Leuven), Belgium in 2007. In 2012 he obtained his Ph.D. degree at the Department of Electrical Engineering at the K.U. Leuven under the supervision of prof. Guido Groeseneken (K.U. Leuven) and prof. Wim Magnus (Universiteit Antwerpen). In 2010, he was a visiting researcher and from 2012 until present he is a research associate at the University of Texas at Dallas in the group of prof. Massimo Fischetti. From 2008 to 2012, he received a Ph.D. grant from the Institute for the Promotion of Innovation through Science and Technology in Flanders (IWT-Vlaanderen). He was awarded the AMI semiconductor thesis prize and received the second prize in the IEEE Region 8 Student Paper Contest. He was a laureate of the Flemish Chemistry, Physics and Mathematics Olympiad and was a member of the Belgian International Mathematical Olympiad team.

He has authored or co-authored over 30 publications in international journals and conference proceedings. His research interest lies in the modeling of nano-electronic devices. More specifically, he investigates the theory of electron transport starting from the laws of quantum mechanics, the numerical methods involved in modeling these devices and the study of realistic device structures using theoretical modeling. During his Ph.D., he focused on the study of electronic transport in tunnel field-effect transistors and is currently investigating the potential use of topological insulators for nano-electronic applications. Questions regarding this event or other NNIN activity?


Contact NNIN/C for this event or other activities:

Blanka Magyari-Kope at blankamk@stanford.edu