ORGANISATION THEORY IN EDUCATION: HOW DOES IT INFORM SCHOOL LEADERSHIP?

TONY BUSH

Abstract


This paper aims to provide an overview of organisation theory and to connect it to theoretical literature and empirical research on school leadership. The paper draws mainly on UK school leadership literature but also includes US and international sources, when appropriate. The paper builds on previous work by the author (e.g. Bush, 2011; Bush & Glover, 2014).

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References


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