• Awarded Scholars:
    • Gabriel R. Sanchez, University of New Mexico
    • Jillian Medeiros, University of New Mexico
    • Kimberly R. Huyser, University of New Mexico

    The Great Recession's economic impact on minorities and immigrants has been especially devastating. Between 2005 and 2009, Hispanic households lost 66 percent of their wealth and black households lost 53 percent, while white households lost only 16 percent. By 2010, when the overall unemployment rate was around 10 percent, it was 16 percent for blacks and 13 percent for Latinos.

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  • Awarded Scholars:
    • Brian Cadena, University of Colorado-Boulder
    • Brian Kovak, Carnegie Mellon University

    When the U.S. housing bubble peaked in mid-2006 and finally burst in 2007, it precipitated the onset of the largest economic downturn since the Great Depression with severe consequences for the housing market. A record 2.9 million foreclosure notices were filed in 2010, 1.2 million were reported in the first half of 2011, and recent reports indicate that foreclosures are on the rise again.

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  • Awarded Scholars:
    • Gary Painter, University of Southern California
    • Zhou Yu, University of Utah

    Beginning in the 1990s immigrants to the United States have increasingly moved away from the traditional gateway cities and begun settling in new destinations.

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