Immigration

Source and Methodological Information

List of Indicators

Percent of Population that is Foreign-Born

Percent of Population Born in Latin America

Percent of Workers that are Foreign-Born

Foreign-Born/Native Disparity in Unemployment Rate

Foreign-Born/Native Disparity in Poverty Status

Latin-America-Born/Native Disparity in Unemployment Rate

Latin-America-Born/Native Disparity in Poverty Status

Size of Unauthorized Immigrant Population

Size of Unauthorized Immigrant Population from Mexico

Total Incoming Passenger Crossings from Mexico

Number of U.S. Border Patrol Apprehensions Along the Southwest Border

 


Percent of Population that is Foreign-Born

Description

Percent of the civilian non-institutionalized population that is foreign-born. 

Source

Percentages are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Foreign-Born Population Data Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

“Foreign-born" includes both non-citizens and naturalized citizens.

 


Percent of Population Born in Latin America

Description

Percent of the civilian non-institutionalized population born in Latin America. 

Source

Percentages are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Foreign-Born Population Data Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

 


Percent of Workers that are Foreign-Born

Description

Percent of employed people age 16 and over who are foreign-born.  

Source

Percentages are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Foreign-Born Population Data Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

“Workers” includes people in the civilian non-institutionalized population who are employed full-time or part-time. “Foreign-born” includes both non-citizens and naturalized citizens.

 


Foreign-Born/Native Disparity in Unemployment Rate

Description

Unemployment rate of foreign-born population age 16 and over, divided by unemployment rate of native-born population age 16 and over.  

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Foreign-Born Population Data Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

“Foreign-born" includes both non-citizens and naturalized citizens.

The unemployment rate is the number of people who are unemployed as a percentage of the civilian labor force. People are classified as unemployed if they do not have a job, have actively looked for work in the prior four weeks, and are currently available for work. Persons who are not working and are waiting to be recalled to a job from which they have been temporarily laid off are also counted as unemployed. The civilian labor force includes people who are currently working and people who are unemployed according to the above definition. 

 


Foreign-Born/Native Disparity in Poverty Rate

Description

Poverty rate of foreign-born population divided by poverty rate of native-born population.  

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Poverty Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

To classify people as poor, the Census Bureau uses a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. If a family's total income is below the poverty threshold relevant to that family, then every individual in the family is classified as poor. The official poverty thresholds do not vary geographically, but they are updated for inflation using the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U). The official poverty definition uses money income before taxes as its measure of income, and does not include capital gains or the monetary value of noncash benefits such as public housing, Medicaid, and food stamps. For more information, see the Census Bureau's poverty definitions.

“Foreign-born" includes both non-citizens and naturalized citizens.

 


Latin-America-Born/Native Disparity in Unemployment Rate

Description

Unemployment rate of Latin-America-born population age 16 and over, divided by unemployment rate of native-born population age 16 and over.  

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Foreign-Born Population Data Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

The unemployment rate is the number of people who are unemployed as a percentage of the civilian labor force. People are classified as unemployed if they do not have a job, have actively looked for work in the prior four weeks, and are currently available for work. Persons who are not working and are waiting to be recalled to a job from which they have been temporarily laid off are also counted as unemployed. The civilian labor force includes people who are currently working and people who are unemployed according to the above definition. 

 


Latin-America-Born/Native Disparity in Poverty Rate

Description

Poverty rate of Latin-America-born population divided by poverty rate of native-born population.  

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Foreign-Born Population Data Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

To classify people as poor, the Census Bureau uses a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. If a family's total income is below the poverty threshold relevant to that family, then every individual in the family is classified as poor. The official poverty thresholds do not vary geographically, but they are updated for inflation using the Consumer Price Index (CPI-U). The official poverty definition uses money income before taxes as its measure of income, and does not include capital gains or the monetary value of noncash benefits such as public housing, Medicaid, and food stamps. For more information, see the Census Bureau's poverty definitions.

 


Size of Unauthorized Immigrant Population

Description

Estimated number of unauthorized immigrants living in the United States.

Source

Pew Hispanic Center

Methodological Notes

The Pew Hispanic Center uses an indirect multistage process to estimate the size of the unauthorized immigrant population. The methodology employed is described here.      

 


Size of Unauthorized Immigrant Population from Mexico

Description

Estimated number of unauthorized immigrants from Mexico living in the United States.

Source

Pew Hispanic Center

Methodological Notes

The Pew Hispanic Center uses an indirect multistage process to estimate the size of the unauthorized immigrant population. The methodology employed is described here.   

 


Total Incoming Passenger Crossings from Mexico

Description

Total number of people entering the United States from Mexico through U.S. border ports. 

Source

U.S. Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Border Crossing/Entry Data.

Methodological Notes

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics’ figures are based on data collected at border ports by U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The data includes train passengers, bus passengers, personal vehicle passengers, and pedestrians. 

 


Number of U.S. Border Patrol Apprehensions along Southwest Border

Description

Total number of people apprehended by the U.S. Border Patrol along the southwest border of the United States. 

Source

U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Border Patrol Apprehension Statistics

Methodological Notes

Counts represent the number of people apprehended by the Border Patrol during the fiscal year ending on September 30 of the reference year.