Income, Wealth, and Debt

Source and Methodological Information

List of Indicators

Upper Limit of Bottom Family Income Quintile

Upper Limit of Second Family Income Quintile

Upper Limit of Middle Family Income Quintile

Upper Limit of Fourth Family Income Quintile

95th Percentile of Family Income

Median Family Income

Asian/White Non-Hispanic Ratio of Median Family Income

Black/White Non-Hispanic Ratio of Median Family Income

Hispanic/White Non-Hispanic Ratio of Median Family Income

Gini Coefficient of Family Income

Ratio of Average Family Income, Middle to Bottom Quintile

Ratio of Average Family Income, Top to Bottom Quintile

Ratio of Average Family Income, Top to Middle Quintile

Ratio of Average Family Income, Top Five Percent to Bottom Quintile

Ratio of Average Family Income, Top Five Percent to Middle Quintile

Household Debt Service Obligations as a Percent of Disposable Personal Income

Household Financial Obligations as a Percent of Disposable Personal Income

Mean Net Worth of the Forbes 400 Richest People in America

Total Number of Bankruptcy Filings  

 


Upper Limit of Bottom Family Income Quintile

Description

The upper limit of the bottom income quintile, in constant dollars. This is the value that separates the bottom 20 percent of the family income distribution from the top 80 percent.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS)

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both racial classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Upper Limit of Second Family Income Quintile

Description

The upper limit of the second income quintile, in constant dollars. This is the value that separates the bottom 40 percent of the family income distribution from the top 60 percent.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS)

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Upper Limit of Middle Family Income Quintile

Description

The upper limit of the middle income quintile, in constant dollars. This is the value that separates the bottom 60 percent of the family income distribution from the top 40 percent.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS)

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Upper Limit of Fourth Family Income Quintile

Description

The upper limit of the fourth income quintile, in constant dollars. This is the value that separates the bottom 80 percent of the family income distribution from the top 20 percent.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS)

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


95th Percentile of Family Income

Description

Amount of family income, in constant dollars, that separates the top 5 percent of families in the income distribution from the bottom 95 percent.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. 

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS).

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.   

 


Median Family Income

Description

Median family income from all sources, in constant dollars.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. 

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS). If the median income is larger than $100,000 (before adjusting for inflation), the Census Bureau reported it as $100,000; these values have been replaced by missing values in the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality database.

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Breakdowns by education only include families where the head of family is 25 years old or over. The category “high school graduates” includes people who received a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Asian/White Non-Hispanic Ratio of Median Family Income

Description

The median income of families with an Asian head of family divided by the median income of families with a white non-Hispanic head of family. 

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement. 

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. Income is adjusted for inflation using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS).

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Black/White Non-Hispanic Ratio of Median Family Income

Description

The median income of families with a black head of family, divided by the median income of families with a white non-Hispanic head of family. 

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. 

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income.

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Hispanic/White Non-Hispanic Ratio of Median Family Income

Description

The median income of families with a Hispanic head of family (of any race), divided by the median income of families with a white non-Hispanic head of family. 

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families.The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. 

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Gini Coefficient of Family Income

Description

A measure of family income inequality ranging from 0 to 1. A value of 1 indicates perfect inequality and a value of 0 indicates perfect equality.

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members. 

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income. 

In 2002, there were substantial changes in the racial categories used by the Census Bureau. Time series by race that include data from both classifications should be interpreted with care. More details on the changes in racial categories. 

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau herehere, and here.

 


Ratio of Average Family Income, Middle Quintile to Bottom Quintile

Description

Average income of families in the middle quintile of the family income distribution, divided by the average income of families in the bottom quintile.

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Ratio of Average Family Income, Top Quintile to Bottom Quintile

Description

Average income of families in the top quintile of the family income distribution, divided by the average income of families in the bottom quintile.

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Ratio of Average Family Income, Top Quintile to Middle Quintile

Description

Average income of families in the top quintile of the family income distribution, divided by the average income of families in the middle quintile.

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Ratio of Average Family Income, Top Five Percent to Bottom Quintile

Description

Average income of families in the top five percent of the family income distribution, divided by the average income of families in the bottom quintile.

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Ratio of Average Family Income, Top Five Percent to Middle Quintile

Description

Average income of families in the top five percent of the family income distribution, divided by the average income of families in the middle quintile.

Source

Ratios are calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the U.S. Census Bureau Historical Income Tables for Families. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Current Population Survey defines a family as a group of two people or more (one of whom is the householder) related by birth, marriage, or adoption and residing together; all such people (including related subfamily members) are considered as members of one family. Beginning with the 1980 Current Population Survey, unrelated subfamilies (referred to in the past as secondary families) are no longer included in the count of families, nor are the members of unrelated subfamilies included in the count of family members.

In the Annual Social and Economic Supplement, respondents report income from the previous calendar year, but they report family and household composition as of the date of the survey. The measure of family income used by the Census Bureau is the sum of the income obtained by all family members 15 years old and over. Income refers to the amount of money income received from each of the following sources: earnings; unemployment compensation; workers’ compensation; social security; supplemental security income; public assistance; veterans’ payments; survivor benefits; disability benefits; pension or retirement income; interest; dividends; rents, royalties, and estates and trusts; educational assistance; alimony; child support; financial assistance from outside of the household; and other income.

Additional methodological information is available from the Census Bureau here and here.

 


Household Debt Service Obligations as a Percent of Disposable Personal Income

Description

Household debt service obligations as a percent of disposable personal income. 

Source

The Federal Reserve Board, Economic Research and Data.

Methodological Notes

Household debt service obligations consist of estimated required payments on outstanding mortgage and consumer debt. Disposable personal income is total household income net of taxes. Annual estimates are an average of quarterly estimates. 

 


Household Financial Obligations as a Percent of Disposable Personal Income

Description

Household financial obligations as a percent of disposable personal income. 

Source

The Federal Reserve Board, Economic Research and Data.

Methodological Notes

Household financial obligations consist of estimated required payments on outstanding mortgage and consumer debt, automobile lease payments, rental payments on tenant-occupied property, homeowners’ insurance, and property tax payments. Disposable personal income is total household income after taxes. Annual estimates are an average of quarterly estimates. 

 


Mean Net Worth of the Forbes 400 Richest People in America

Description

Mean net worth in constant dollars of the 400 richest people in America, as reported by Forbes magazine.

Source

Forbes 400 Richest People in America

Methodological Notes

Detailed methodological notes are available at the Forbes website. 

Data are adjusted for inflation by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS).

 


Total Number of Bankruptcy Filings

Description

Total number of business and non-business bankruptcy cases commenced in the 12-month period ending June 30.

Source

United States Courts Bankruptcy Statistics.