Social Safety Net

Source and Methodological Information

List of Indicators

Unemployment Insurance Coverage Rate

Unemployment Insurance Recipiency Rate

Unemployment Insurance Exhaustion Rate

Number of Weeks Compensated by Unemployment Insurance

Number of First Unemployment Insurance Payments

Expenditures per Capita on Unemployment Insurance

Number of Households Receiving Housing Aid

Expenditures per Capita on Housing Aid

Number of People Receiving AFDC/TANF

Number of Families Receiving AFDC/TANF

Percent of Population Receiving AFDC/TANF

Expenditures per Capita on AFDC/TANF

Number of Children Enrolled in Head Start

Expenditures per Capita on Head Start

Number of People Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Number of Households Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Percent of Population Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Percent of Households Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Expenditures per Capita on Food Stamps/SNAP

Number of People Receiving WIC Benefits

Expenditures per Capita on the WIC Program

Number of Children Participating in the School Breakfast Program

Number of Children Participating in the School Lunch Program

Expenditures per Capita on School Food Programs

Number of Families Receiving Federal Earned Income Tax Credit

Federal Earned Income Tax Credit Average Benefits

Expenditures per Capita on the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit

Number of People Receiving Old-Age and Survivors Insurance

Expenditures per Capita on Old-Age and Survivors Insurance

Number of People Receiving Disability Insurance

Expenditures per Capita on Disability Insurance

Number of People Receiving Supplemental Security Income

Expenditures per Capita on Supplemental Security Income

Number of People Covered by Medicaid and CHIP

Number of People Receiving Medicaid Benefits

Expenditures per Capita on Medicaid and CHIP

Number of People Receiving Medicare

Expenditures per Capita on Medicare

Expenditures per Capita on Workers' Compensation

Expenditures per Capita on Means-Tested and Social Insurance Programs

Expenditures per Capita on Means-Tested Programs

Expenditures per Capita on Social Insurance Programs

Expenditures per Capita on Means-Tested Programs other than Medicaid

 


Unemployment Insurance Coverage Rate

Description

Percent of non-farm employment covered by unemployment insurance.

Source

Calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using data from the Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Employment and Training Administration Financial Handbook 394, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Employment Statistics.  

Methodological Notes

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own, and meet certain other eligibility requirements. 

The unemployment insurance coverage rate is calculated by dividing the average monthly covered employment by total nonfarm employment. 

Average monthly covered employment is the 12-month average of the number of covered employees reported to the states by employers. From 1938 to 1944, data were reported for the last payroll period of each month; from 1945 to 1962, data were reported for the payroll period ending nearest to the 15th day of each month; and for 1963 and after, data have been reported for the payroll period including the 12th day of each month. More details are available from the Department of Labor.

Total nonfarm employment is the total number of people employed in the non-farm business sector, as estimated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics with data from its Current Employment Statistics Survey. It excludes people who are self-employed. 

 


Unemployment Insurance Recipiency Rate

Description

Percent of unemployed people who file for unemployment insurance benefits.

Source

Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Unemployment Insurance Chartbook (Table A-12, “Regular Program Insured Unemployment as a Percent of Total Unemployment”). 

Methodological Notes

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own, and meet certain other eligibility requirements. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics classifies people as unemployed if they do not have a job, have actively looked for work in the prior four weeks, and are currently available for work. 

 


Unemployment Insurance Exhaustion Rate

Description

Unemployment insurance claimants who collect all of their insurance entitlement in a given year, as a percent of the number of first-time claimants in that same year.

Source

Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Unemployment Insurance Chartbook (Table A-9, “Exhaustion Rates vs. Total Unemployment Rate”). 

Methodological Notes

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own, and meet certain other eligibility requirements. 

The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality calculates annual averages of the monthly estimates provided by the Department of Labor. 

Claimants who exhaust their benefits in any year may have started receiving them in the previous year. 

 


Number of Weeks Compensated by Unemployment Insurance

Description

The number of weeks unemployment insurance was paid to each unemployed, summed across all the unemployed.

Source

Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Employment and Training Administration Financial Handbook 394.

Methodological Notes

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own, and meet certain other eligibility requirements. Recipients who work part-time can receive partial benefits. This indicator includes all weeks for which benefits were paid, including both total and partial unemployment.

 


Number of First Unemployment Insurance Payments

Description

The number of first unemployment insurance (UI) checks issued to claimants during their benefit year.

Source

Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Employment and Training Administration Financial Handbook 394.

Methodological Notes

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own, and meet certain other eligibility requirements.

A recipient’s benefit year is the one-year period during which she or he can claim benefits. In states with a variable benefit year (different beginning and ending dates across claimants), most claimants are issued only one first payment during a calendar year. In states with a uniform benefit year (the same beginning and ending dates for all claimants), it is possible for a relatively few claimants to be issued two first payments during a calendar year.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Unemployment Insurance

Description

Total outlays for unemployment compensation in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Office of Management and Budget Historical Tables and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides unemployment benefits to eligible workers who become unemployed through no fault of their own, and meet certain other eligibility requirements.

Outlays are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of Households Receiving Housing Aid

Description

Number of households benefited by any of the Department of Housing and Urban Development housing aid programs.

Source

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Performance and Accountability Reports; and 2000 Green Book, Table 15-30.

Methodological Notes

Housing aid includes public and other assisted rental housing, the Community Development Block Grant Program, the HOME Investment Partnerships Program, the Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program, Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS, Indian Housing Block Grants, Rural Housing & Economic Development, Native Hawaiian Homeland Block Grants, and the American Dream Downpayment Initiative.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Housing Aid

Description

Total outlays for housing aid in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Office of Management and Budget Historical Tables and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Outlays are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Receiving AFDC/TANF

Description

Average monthly number of people receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). 

Source

Administration for Children and Families, TANF Caseload Data

Methodological Notes

Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) is a federal program that gives cash assistance and other forms of aid to low-income families with children.  In 1997, TANF replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which had similar goals. 

 


Number of Families Receiving AFDC/TANF

Description

Average monthly number of families receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). 

Source

Administration for Children and Families.

Methodological Notes

Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) is a federal program that gives cash assistance and other forms of aid to low-income families with children.  In 1997, TANF replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which had similar goals. From 1997 to 1999, TANF was being phased in and AFDC was being phased out.  The data for the entire population includes people participating in either program. However, the breakdowns by family type only include TANF families. Data for families are reported for each fiscal year (October to September).

 


Percent of Population Receiving AFDC/TANF

Description

Average monthly number of families receiving Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), as a percent of the total population.    

Source

Calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using data from the Administration for Children and Families and the U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) is a federal program that gives cash assistance and other forms of aid to low-income families with children.  In 1997, TANF replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which had similar goals. 

 


Expenditures per Capita on AFDC/TANF 

Description

Total spending on AFDC/TANF in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using TANF financial data from the Administration for Children and Families and from the Indicators of Welfare Dependence reports, and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) is a federal program that gives cash assistance and other forms of aid to low-income families with children. In 1997, TANF replaced the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program, which had similar goals.

Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of Children Enrolled in Head Start

Description

Number of children enrolled in the Head Start program.

Source

Administration for Children and Families, Head Start Fact Sheets.

Methodological Notes

Head Start is a national program that promotes school readiness of children ages birth to 5 from low-income families. The program enhances the children’s social and cognitive development through the provision of educational, health, nutritional, social, and other services.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Head Start

Description

Total appropriations for Head Start in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Administration for Children and Families, Head Start Fact Sheets and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Head Start is a national program that promotes school readiness of children ages birth to 5 from low-income families. The program enhances the children’s social and cognitive development through the provision of educational, health, nutritional, social, and other services.

Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Description

Average monthly number of people participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the Food Stamp Program prior to 2008.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides low-income households with “electronic benefits” they can use like a debit card to purchase food at stores authorized by the Department of Agriculture. More information about the program is available from the Department of Agriculture

 


Number of Households Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Description

Average monthly number of households participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the Food Stamp Program prior to 2008.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides low-income households with “electronic benefits” they can use like a debit card to purchase food at stores authorized by the Department of Agriculture. More information about the program is available from the Department of Agriculture

 


Percent of Population Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Description

Average monthly number of people participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the Food Stamp Program prior to 2008, as a percent of the total population. 

Source

Calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Statistical Abstract of the United States

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides low-income households with “electronic benefits” they can use like a debit card to purchase food at stores authorized by the Department of Agriculture. More information is available from the Department of Agriculture.

The average monthly number of people participating in the SNAP/Food Stamps Program is reported by the Department of Agriculture. The size of the total population is reported in the Statistical Abstract

 


Percent of Households Participating in Food Stamps/SNAP

Description

Average monthly number of households participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the Food Stamp Program prior to 2008, as a percent of the total number of households. 

Source

Calculated by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Statistical Abstract of the United States

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides low-income households with “electronic benefits” they can use like a debit card to purchase food at stores authorized by the Department of Agriculture. More information is available from the Department of Agriculture.

The average monthly number of households participating in the SNAP/Food Stamps Program is reported by the Department of Agriculture. The total number of households in the population is reported in the Statistical Abstract

 


Expenditures per Capita on Food Stamps/SNAP

Description

Total expenditures in constant dollars on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the Food Stamp Program prior to 2008, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides low-income households with “electronic benefits” they can use like a debit card to purchase food at stores authorized by the Department of Agriculture. More information about the program is available from the Department of Agriculture.

Total expenditures include benefits paid to program participants and other program costs, such as administrative expenses and the cost of nutrition education programs. Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Receiving WIC Benefits

Description

Average monthly number of people participating in the Women, Infants, and Children Program.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service.

Methodological Notes

The WIC program provides federal grants to states for supplemental foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education for low-income women who are pregnant or postpartum, and to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk.

 


Expenditures per Capita on the WIC Program

Description

Total expenditures on the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The WIC program provides federal grants to states for supplemental foods, health care referrals, and nutrition education for low-income women who are pregnant or postpartum, and to infants and children up to age five who are found to be at nutritional risk.

Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of Children Participating in the School Breakfast Program

Description

Monthly average number of children participating in the School Breakfast Program.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services.

Methodological Notes

The School Breakfast Program is a federal program that provides cash assistance to states to operate nonprofit breakfast programs in schools and residential childcare institutions. School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the program receive cash subsidies from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve breakfasts that meet federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price breakfasts to eligible children.

The monthly average number of children is computed with data from October through December of the previous year, plus January through May plus September of the current year.

 


Number of Children Participating in the School Lunch Program

Description

Monthly average number of children participating in the National School Lunch Program.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services.

Methodological Notes

The School Lunch Program is a federal program that provides cash assistance to states to operate nonprofit lunch programs in schools and residential childcare institutions. School districts and independent schools that choose to take part in the National School Lunch Program get cash subsidies and donated commodities from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for each meal they serve. In return, they must serve lunches that meet federal requirements, and they must offer free or reduced price lunches to eligible children.

The monthly average number of children is computed with data from October through December of the previous year, plus January through May plus September of the current year.

 


Expenditures per Capita on School Food Programs

Description

Total expenditures in constant dollars on the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, and the Special Milk Program, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of Families Receiving Federal Earned Income Tax Credit

Description

Number of families receiving the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). 

Source

Urban Institute and Brookings Institution, Tax Policy Center.

Methodological Notes

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable federal income tax credit for low to moderate income working individuals and families. More information about the EITC is available from the Internal Revenue Service

 


Federal Earned Income Tax Credit Average Benefits

Description

Average amount received by families claiming the federal Earned Income Tax Credit, in constant dollars

Source

Urban Institute and Brookings Institution, Tax Policy Center.

Methodological Notes

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable federal income tax credit for low to moderate income working individuals and families. More information about the EITC is available from the Internal Revenue Service

Data are adjusted for inflation by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality using the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers Research Series (CPI-U-RS)

 


Expenditures per Capita on the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit

Description

Total amount of federal Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC) claimed by taxpayers in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Urban Institute and Brookings Institution, Tax Policy Center and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable federal income tax credit for low to moderate income working individuals and families. More information about the EITC is available from the Internal Revenue Service.

Dollars are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Receiving Old-Age and Survivors Insurance

Description

Number of people receiving Old Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) benefits as of December 31 of each year.

Source

Social Security Administration, Statistical Tables.

Methodological Notes

Old-Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) benefits are paid monthly to retired-worker (old-age) beneficiaries and their spouses and children and to survivors of deceased insured workers. For more information, see the Social Security Administration’s publications on Retirement Benefits and Survivor’s Benefits.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Old-Age and Survivors Insurance

Description

Total annual benefits paid from the Old Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) Trust Fund in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population

Source

Social Security Administration, Statistical Tables and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The OASI Trust Fund is a separate account in the United States Treasury. The trust fund provides automatic spending authority to the Social Security Administration (SSA) to pay monthly benefits to retired-worker (old-age) beneficiaries and their spouses and children and to survivors of deceased insured workers. With such spending authority the SSA does not need to periodically request money from Congress to pay benefits. For more information, see the Social Security Administration’s publications on Retirement Benefits and Survivor’s Benefits.

Benefits are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Receiving Disability Insurance

Description

Number of people receiving Disability Insurance (DI) benefits as of December 31 of each year.

Source

Social Security Administration, Statistical Tables.

Methodological Notes

Disability Insurance (DI) benefits are paid monthly to disabled workers and their spouses and children. For more information, see the Social Security Administration’s publication on Disability Benefits.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Disability Insurance

Description

Total annual benefits paid from the Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population

Source

Social Security Administration, Statistical Tables and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The DI Trust Fund is a separate account in the United States Treasury. The trust fund provides automatic spending authority to the Social Security Administration (SSA) to pay monthly benefits to disabled-worker beneficiaries and their spouses and children. With such spending authority, the SSA does not need to periodically request money from Congress to pay benefits. For more information, see the Social Security Administration’s publication on Disability Benefits.

Benefits are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Receiving Supplemental Security Income

Description

Number of people receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments in December of each year.

Source

Social Security Administration, Annual Statistical Supplement.

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program provides income support to persons aged 65 or older, blind or disabled adults, and blind or disabled children.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Supplemental Security Income

Description

Total Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population

Source

Social Security Administration, Annual Statistical Supplement; the 1998 Green Book Table 3-24 ; and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program provides income support to persons aged 65 or older, blind or disabled adults, and blind or disabled children.

Benefits are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Covered by Medicaid and CHIP

Description

Total number of people of all ages covered by Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Source

U.S. Census Bureau, Historical Health Insurance Tables. The Census Bureau’s estimates are based on data from the Current Population Survey.

Methodological Notes

Medicaid is a public program administered at the state level, which provides medical assistance to the needy. Families with dependent children, the aged, blind, and disabled who are in financial need are eligible for Medicaid. The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), formerly called the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), is a program administered at the state level that provides health care for low- and moderate-income children who do not qualify for Medicaid (in many states the income and age thresholds for ineligibility are higher for CHIP than for Medicaid).

 


Number of People Receiving Medicaid Benefits

Description

Number of people receiving medical services covered by Medicaid.

Source

Social Security Administration, Annual Statistical Supplement; and 2000 Green Book, Table 15-14.

Methodological Notes

Medicaid is a public program administered at the state level, which provides medical assistance to the needy. Families with dependent children, the aged, blind, and disabled who are in financial need are eligible for the program.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Medicaid and CHIP

Description

Total expenditures on Medicare and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, National Health Expenditure Accounts (Historical Data) and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Medicaid is a public program administered at the state level, which provides medical assistance to the needy. Families with dependent children, the aged, blind, and disabled who are in financial need are eligible for the program. The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), formerly called the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), is a program administered at the state level that provides health care for low- and moderate-income children who do not qualify for Medicaid (in many states the income and age thresholds for ineligibility are higher for CHIP than for Medicaid).

Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Number of People Receiving Medicare

Description

Number of people enrolled in Medicare as or July 31 of each year.

Source

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Medicare Enrollment Reports.

Methodological Notes

Medicare is a public health insurance program for people age 65 or older, people under the age of 65 with certain disabilities, and people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Medicare

Description

Total expenditures on Medicare in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, National Health Expenditure Accounts (Historical Data) and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Medicare is a public health insurance program for people age 65 or older, people under the age of 65 with certain disabilities, and people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease.

Expenditures are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Workers’ Compensation

Description

Total workers’ compensation benefits in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

National Academy of Social Insurance, Workers’ Compensation: Benefits, Coverage, and Costs, 2009 and U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates.

Methodological Notes

Workers’ compensation provides medical care, rehabilitation, and cash benefits for workers who are injured on the job or who contract work-related illnesses. It also pays benefits to families of workers who die of work-related causes. This measure includes benefits paid from the federal government, state governments, private insurance carriers, and self-insuring employers.

Outlays are adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Economic Analysis price index for Gross Domestic Product. See National Income and Product Accounts.

 


Expenditures per Capita on Means-Tested and Social Insurance Programs

Description

Total expenditures on means-tested and social insurance public programs in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the data underlying each of the indicators listed in the methodological notes.

Methodological Notes

“Means-tested programs" are public programs for which only people with income or assets below some threshold are eligible. “Social insurance programs" are public programs in which people receive benefits or services in recognition of contributions made by them or on their behalf, and are typically associated to a history of work and earnings. The measure is constructed by summing the following indicators:

Means-Tested Programs:
Expenditures per Capita on Medicaid
Expenditures per Capita on Supplemental Security Income
Expenditures per Capita on AFDC/TANF
Expenditures per Capita on the Federal EITC
Expenditures per Capita on Food Stamps/SNAP
Expenditures per Capita on Housing Aid
Expenditures per Capita on School Food Programs
Expenditures per Capita on the WIC Program
Expenditures per Capita on Head Start

Social Insurance Programs:
Expenditures per Capita on Medicare
Expenditures per Capita on Old-Age and Survivors Insurance
Expenditures per Capita on Unemployment Insurance
Expenditures per Capita on Workers’ Compensation
Expenditures per Capita on Disability Insurance

 


Expenditures per Capita on Means-Tested Programs

Description

Total expenditures on means-tested public programs in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the data underlying each of the indicators listed in the methodological notes.

Methodological Notes

“Means-tested programs" are public programs for which only people with income or assets below some threshold are eligible. The measure is constructed by summing the following indicators:

Expenditures per Capita on Medicaid
Expenditures per Capita on Supplemental Security Income
Expenditures per Capita on AFDC/TANF
Expenditures per Capita on the Federal EITC
Expenditures per Capita on Food Stamps/SNAP
Expenditures per Capita on Housing Aid
Expenditures per Capita on School Food Programs
Expenditures per Capita on the WIC Program
Expenditures per Capita on Head Start

 


 

Expenditures per Capita on Social Insurance Programs

Description

Total expenditures on social insurance public programs in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the data underlying each of the indicators listed in the methodological notes.

Methodological Notes

“Social insurance programs" are public programs in which people receive benefits or services in recognition of contributions made by them or on their behalf, and are typically associated to a history of work and earnings. The measure is constructed by summing the following indicators:

Expenditures per Capita on Medicare
Expenditures per Capita on Old-Age and Survivors Insurance
Expenditures per Capita on Unemployment Insurance
Expenditures per Capita on Workers’ Compensation
Expenditures per Capita on Disability Insurance

 


Expenditures per Capita on Means-Tested Programs other than Medicaid

Description

Total expenditures on means-tested public programs other than Medicaid in constant dollars, divided by the country’s total population.

Source

Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, using the data underlying each of the indicators listed in the methodological notes.

Methodological Notes

“Means-tested programs" are public programs for which only people with income or assets below some threshold are eligible. The measure is constructed by summing the following indicators:

Expenditures per Capita on Supplemental Security Income
Expenditures per Capita on AFDC/TANF
Expenditures per Capita on the Federal EITC
Expenditures per Capita on Food Stamps/SNAP
Expenditures per Capita on Housing Aid
Expenditures per Capita on School Food Programs
Expenditures per Capita on the WIC Program
Expenditures per Capita on Head Start