Stanford University
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Social Unrest Surrounding Chilean Aquaculture, 2000-2010
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Social Unrest Surrounding Chilean Aquaculture, 2000-2010

Authors: Anne Winslow and Andrew Gerhart

Popular portrayals of Patagonia in southern Chile have depicted it as a vast wilderness devoid of all human activity, but toward various ends. On the one hand, it has been heralded by conservationists for its wild purity. Indeed, northerners have raised the cry to protect it so effectively that it has become an icon for untouched wilderness the world over, capturing European and North American imaginations (and clothing their bodies in its labels). But for very different purposes, this same wilderness motif has often been extended from the land to the ocean to justify the rapid expansion of salmon farming to exploit vast seascapes left idle.

As flawed as such portrayals are of its landmass, those of the Patagonian coastlines and seascapes where salmon farming has historically occurred are completely unfounded. These areas have an old and rich cultural history of marine tenure in a variety of forms--such as kelp farming, oyster and mussel growing, urchin and loco collecting, and artisanal fishing. Thus, as industrial salmon farming grew in the region it inevitably ran into those who opposed its new forms of marine appropriation.

This visualization begins an effort to document this opposition in its various manifestations. It has been divided among three main forms of contestation to salmon farming coming from artisanal fishermen, indigenous people, and, most importantly, salmon workers themselves.

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Neoliberalism, Civic Participation and the Salmon Industry in Southern Chile
Neoliberalism, Civic Participation and the Salmon Industry in Southern Chile
Spatial History