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STANFORD UNIVERSITY

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES


BEFORE YOU START: The "Spires machine" is now one of the corn-cluster AFS machines accessed at "corn.stanford.edu".  If you intend to access some other machines at Stanford via your terminal (not via a browser), then you may need to run a VPN Client.


The following instructions are to be done after launching SecureCRT.

One of the first things you'll want to do when setting up SecureCRT for access to a spires host-machine is to define a Session.  This is done from the "File -> Connect..." choice.  It is probably easiest to copy an existing session to make a clone you can safely alter.  The Connect picture shows that a copy has been made of the slac session.  This was done with the Copy / Paste buttons along the top of the tool bar, to the right of the scissors.  You Copy an existing session selection, and Paste to get another with (1) appended.

Connect window

Connect window

You then alter this cloned session.  Select it (single click), and then click the Properties button on the tool bar.  That's the icon that looks like a scroll with a hand pointing to it.  Properties opens a new window that shows all the session options.  The first is Connection, which has a Name that is the cloned session's name with the (1) appendage.  Change the entire name to whatever Name you want to call this session.
 
When you all done making changes, you'll click the "OK" button to save your changes, but don't do that until completely done.

Session Settings

Session Settings

Now, click on the SSH2 choice under Connection in the Category side bar.  This gives you the SSH2 picture where you'll enter the Hostname and Username.  The picture shows Hostname as "target.stanford.edu", but you'll probably want to substitute "corn08.stanford.edu" or some other full-qualified hostname.  The Username is shown as "sunetid", and you'll want to enter your SunetID as the Username.  The rest of the choices are what should be used to make this connection.  SPECIAL NOTE: The Kerberose options should NOT be checked under Key exchange.

SSH2 Settings

SSH2 Settings

The next three pictures show the session's Name, which is usually the Hostname.  These are the Emulation, Advanced, and Appearance pictures.  Click on the Terminal Emulation choice to get the Emulation window.  Set the Terminal to VT100, and click on the ANSI color choice.  We'll cover colors later.  The rest of the options are up to you, but what is shown in the picture is recommended.
 
You may NOT wish to "Select an alternate keyboard emulation" if you want your key-pad to work as a number-pad.  The "Enter" key on the right corner of your number-pad sometimes works as an "attention" key (Ctrl-C).  In that case, you should ALWAYS use the Enter/return key over the Shift key when entering data.

Terminal Emulation Settings

Terminal Emulation Settings

Click on the Terminal Advanced choice to get the Advanced window.  The Advanced picture shows two important things.  The "Terminal type" is set to "vt100s" (all lower case).  And the "Shift forces local mouse operations" choice is checked.  That's because Spires/Prism and Wylbur all respond to mouse clicks to reposition the input cursor to the mouse cursor's position.  You cannot "press, drag, and release" to highlight text to be copied to the Clipboard unless you hold down a Shift key when you press the mouse's button (any button).

Terminal Advanced Settings

Terminal Advanced Settings

There is a "Mapped Keys" section that allows you to define certain keys to have a meaningful function.  For example, the "Insert" key on many keyboards doesn't send a useful code.  You can change such a key using "Mapped Keys".  For example, you could define the "Insert" key to send ESC-I (Escape-eye), which in Spires, Prism and Wylbur acts as a toggle to enter/leave Insert mode.  ESC is indicated by "\e", so you'd enter "\eI" to specify ESC-I.  Basically, the steps are something like this:


    Choose "Mapped Keys"
    1 Click the "Map a Key" button.  A Map Key dialog box will appear with instructions.
    2 Using your keyboard, press the key (e.g., F9), that you would like to map.  The Map Selected Key window will appear.
    3 From the Function menu, select Send String from the drop-down list.
    4 In the Send String field, enter the string to which you would like the key to map (e.g., \e9 for F9).
    5 Repeat steps 1-4 for other keys, as needed.
    6 Check "Delete sends backspace" if not already checked.

A complete table of key combinations that can be mapped are
contained in Full Screen Key Sequences.

Terminal Mapped Keys

Terminal Mapped Keys

Next, click on the Terminal Appearance choice to get the Appearance window.  The Appearance picture shows the recommended settings.  In particular, the cursor should "Use color", and you should select a DARK color by pressing the Color button and making a selection.  Remember to click OK for all operations to save them, including the Appearance window.  Then "Close" the Connect window.

Terminal Appearance Settings

Terminal Appearance Settings

You're almost finished!.  Under the Options drop-down menu you'll find "Global Options".  Click that to get the Global Options window, and then click the ANSI Color choice to get the final window.  For Normal colors, choose WHITE on the left and BLACK on the right.  For Bold colors, choose a light color on the left and a dark color on the right.  This will make SecureCRT come closest to emulating a Samson session:  WHITE background and BLACK foreground text.  The other colors are probably good enough, although you're welcome to experiment.  If you want a typical XTERM display (BLACK background, WHITE text), then click the Default buttons.  That is SecureCRT's default...to emulate an XTERM terminal.

ANSI Color Settings

ANSI Color Settings.

Click OK to save everything.  You're done setting up SecureCRT!  However, you may have to make changes in your .login or .cshrc or .bash_login files on Unix/Linux/Darwin, and your .wylbur_logon file.  Your terminal type (vt100s) must be allowed to pass through to Spires/Prism and Wylbur.  So be sure your login script allows vt100s to pass through. The environment variable is called TERM, and can be referenced in your login script by $TERM.  Likewise, .wylbur_logon must allow terminal type (TTYPE) of vt100s.  In Spires/Prism, the $TTYPE variable contains the terminal type name.


You may also need to setup TERMINFO if it isn't already defined in your scripts.

Use "setenv TERMINFO ~guertin/terminfo" on Unix/Linux.


Now, from the File menu of SecureCRT, click on the "Connect..." choice to get your Connect window again.  Select the session you want and click the "Connect" button.    Have fun with Spires/Prism and Wylbur.


IMPORTANT  INFORMATION

If you have trouble seeing your input, such as black-on-black or white-on-white, don't panic.  Just click on the Properties button on your Session's menu bar, and go to the Terminal Emulation category.  Uncheck the "ANSI Color" check box, then click OK to complete the actions.  This should make your screen black and white, and your text should be visible.  Report this to your Spires/Prism consultants so they can help you alter your .login and .wylbur_logon files.  If necessary, file a HelpSU ticket under Administrative Applications -> UnixSPIRES  (see service bar below).


If you do see your input, but is has the wrong colors, your version of SecureCRT may be out-of-date.  Go to the ess.stanford.edu web site for Windows and download the latest SecureCRT.  You may be given the choice to just "Run" instead of download.  That's OK.  Select the "repair" option during the installation.  That's usually enough to correct your color display.  Many people have troubles with yellow background showing white letters.  Back in the Global Options for ANSI, change the yellow color to something darker, like the orange at the bottom of the list that contains the choice for yellow.


Last modified Thursday, 15-May-2014 09:17:42 PM

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