Archive for the ‘powerpoint’ Category

Techie Tip of the Week: Place and Manipulate Objects in PowerPoint

Friday, April 19th, 2013
PowerPoint allows you great flexibility in terms of manipulating where objects (e.g., text boxes, pictures, and drawings) will appear on the screen. These tips will help you use the object and drawing functions more effectively.
  1. To align multiple objects so they line up precisely using the Drawing toolbar:
    1. Make sure that the Drawing toolbar is checked. Under View, select ToolbarsDrawing should have a check to the left.
    2. Hold down the shift key while selecting the objects you wish to align.
    3. In the Drawing toolbar, under Drawchoose Align/Distribute and select the desired Alignment/Distribution.
  2. To align objects using Snap To, Grids, andGuides:
    • In the Drawing toolbar, under Draw, selectGrid and Guidelines.
    • To display the grid, check the box Display grid on screen.
    • To snap objects to the grid, check the boxSnap objects to grid. Objects will now snap to the grid when they are moved around.
  3. To move an object very precisely, by “nudging” it:
    • Select the object you wish to “nudge”.
    • On your keyboard, use the arrow keys to move the object. Hold down the control key, if you want even more control. The object will move in increments of 0.02 inches!
  4. To connect two objects with a drawn line:

    • In the Drawing toolbar, underAutoShapes, select Connectors, and choose the desired connector.
    • Move the mouse to the first object until you see a blue dot. Click to create a connection point.
    • Drag the mouse to the second object to create a connecting line. Click when you see the blue dot on the second object. The two objects are now connected.
  5. To group multiple objects together:
    • Hold down the shift key while selecting the objects you wish to group.
    • In the Drawing toolbar, under Draw, choose Group. The objects are now grouped, and can be moved, resized, or otherwise manipulated together.
  6. To change the order of objects that are on top of one another:
    • Select the object whose order you want to change.
    • In the Drawing toolbar, under Draw, choose Order and then the desired order (e.g., Send Backward, or Bring to Front).
  7. To create a text box, under the Insert menu, choose Text Box.
  8. To modify an existing text box:
    1. To resize the text box, select the box and click and drag the dot in the middle of the border (sizing handles) to the desired size. Dragging the corner will resize both the height and width; holding down the Shift key while resizing will retain the ratio between the height and width.
    2. To modify the content of a text box, select the box’s border twice — the border will change from diagonal lines to dots. Once selected, you can modify the text box’s content:
      1. To change the font, under Format, choose Font. Select the desired font changes (font face, style, size, color, and/or effects) and click OK.
      2. To move a text box, click and drag the box to the desired location.
      3. To change text box’s format, double-click the border.
        • In the tab Color and Lines, you can change the text box’s Fill,Lines, and/or Arrows styles.
        • In the tab Size, you can change the text box’s size and rotation and scale (height and width).
        • In the tab Position, you can change the location of the text box in the slide.
        • In the tab Text Box, you can change the anchor point of the text (top/middle/bottom), as well as the internal margins of the text box.

Techie Tip of the Week: Fit Photos to Shapes in PowerPoint

Friday, January 18th, 2013

Last week, we talked about how to autofit a photo into a text box using Picture or Texture Fill.

Today’s tip will show how you can fit a photo into a particular shape (oval, arrow, triangle, etc.).

  1. Select the picture or pictures that you want to crop to a specific shapeNote: If you are cropping multiple pictures, you must crop to the same shape. To crop to different shapes, crop the pictures individually.
  1. In PowerPoint 2007/2010 (Windows), in Picture Tools, on the Format tab, in the Size group, click the arrow under Crop, and then click Crop to Shape.

    In PowerPoint 2011 (Mac), in Format Picture, in Adjust, click the arrow to the side of Crop, and then click Mask to Shape.

    List after click the Crop button
    Windows


    Macintosh

 

  1. Select the desired shape.


 

Techie Tip of the Week: AutoFit Photos in PowerPoint Boxes

Friday, January 11th, 2013

If you insert a photo into a PowerPoint presentation, by default the image will be inserted at the exact size it really is. That’s great if your photo matches the size of the slide and/or is already the desired size. But if the photo doesn’t match, you need to painstakingly manually drag the edges of the photo until it finally fits — a hugely time-consuming activity.

There’s a better way — instead of inserting a photo, create a text box. Then, format the text box to have as its content the desired photo as a picture fill.

Here’s how:

  1. In PowerPoint, create or select the desired text box.
  2. Right-click the box.
  3. Select Format Shape.
  4. In Fill, choose Picture or Texture Fill.
  5. In Insert from, click File.
  6. Locate the desired photo, and click Insert.
  7. Click Close.

The photo will match the size of your box. You can drag the box and resize, rotate, or otherwise manipulate as desired.

Techie Tip of the Week: LibreOffice and OpenOffice – Open Source Alternatives to MS Office

Friday, September 7th, 2012

Last summer, we talked about OpenOffice.org as a viable alternative to the Microsoft Office near-monopoly on office software.

This week, we’d thought we’d revisit OpenOffice.org and let you know about a particularly great version of OpenOffice – LibreOffice!

As they say on their website, LibreOffice is the power-packed free, libre and open source personal productivity suite for Windows, Macintosh and GNU/Linux, that gives you six feature-rich applications for all your document production and data processing needs.

Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Math and Base all look, feel, and work the same way that their Office 2003 equivalents did. And they can open, edit, and save all Office file formats, including the new 2007/2010 versions. You can save your documents in any office format, including PDF!

Some of the newest features:

 

LibreOffice /OpenOffice Equivalent Microsoft Office Equivalent
Writer Word
Calc Excel
Impress PowerPoint
Base Access
Draw An All-Purpose Diagramming and Charting Tool (no real MS Office Equivalent – similar to the drawing tools in PowerPoint)
Math MS Equation Editor

Watch a Tech Briefing video Open Source Tools, including OpenOffice and LibreOffice.

Techie Tip of the Week: Apply a New Slide Master to a PowerPoint Presentation

Friday, July 27th, 2012

Tired of the same-old PowerPoint templates that Microsoft offers? You can create your own, and then apply that new template to future presentations. Today’s tip will show you how to apply a new theme/design to your presentation.

  1. First, create (or find) a PowerPoint slide deck that looks the way you want all future slide decks to look.
  2. Next, create (or open, if it already exists) the PowerPoint slide deck you wish to change.
  3. If you are using PowerPoint 2003, on the Format menu, click Slide Design.
    If you are using PowerPoint 2007/2010, on the Ribbon, click Design.
  4. If you are using PowerPoint 2003, click the Browse button at the bottom of the task pane.
    If you are using PowerPoint 2007/2010, click the More button found in the lower-right corner of the default designs, and then click Browse for Themes.
  5. Locate the PowerPoint file you wish to use as the template.
  6. Click Apply.

Your new theme/design template is now applied to your presentation.

Mac Users: MS Office Interactive Command Reference Guides – 2008 to the new interface!

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

A few weeks ago we spotlighted the Interactive Command Reference Guides for Windows users. Mac users, have no fear! Here are the links to the Interactive Command Reference Guides for you!

Finally making the leap from Office 2004 or 2008 to 2011? Wondering where your favorite commands are located in the new interface? Or just want to explore the new interface with a little guidance?

Techie Tip of the Week: Saving a PowerPoint Presentation as a Movie

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Macintosh users have been able to convert PowerPoint Presentations to a movie format for years. But until Office 2010, on the Windows side, if you wanted to convert a PowerPoint into a movie, you had to install 3rd party software like Captivate, Jing, or Camtasia. With the advent of PowerPoint 2010, however, Windows users can now save their PowerPoint files into the WMV movie format, which can be then uploaded to YouTube or other video hosting services.

To save your PowerPoint into a movie format:

  • PowerPoint 2010 (Windows) — WMV file format
    1. Create your PowerPoint Presentation.
    2. Click the File button, and then click Save & Send.
    3. In the File Types section, click Create a Video. Select the desired options, and then click Create Video.
    4. In the File name field, enter the name of the presentation/video.
    5. Click Save. Your presentation is now a WMV movie!
  • PowerPoint 2004/2008/2011 (Macintosh) — MOV file format
    1. Create your PowerPoint Presentation.
    2. On the File menu, click Make Movie.
    3. In the Save As box, enter the name of the presentation/video.
    4. Click Save. Your presentation is now a MOV movie!

Use AutoCorrect in MS Office to Save Typing Time!

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Here’s a great time-saving technique in Microsoft Office — use AutoCorrect to automatically enter text that you often use. Most people realize that AutoCorrect automatically corrects misspelled words — for example, the misspelled word abbout is automatically corrected to about.

But did you know that you can create your own set of keyboard shortcuts to automatically write phrases or words you often use? For example, if you often type Stanford University in a document, you can set the letters su to automatically be replaced with the phrase Stanford University.

Here’s how to add phrases and words in the AutoCorrect options:

Office 2003/2004/2008/2011

  1. On the Tools menu, click AutoCorrect.
  2. In the Replace text as you type section, in the Replace field, enter the shortcut text (e.g., su).
  3. In the With field, enter the text you wish it to be replaced by (e.g., Stanford University).
  4. Click Add, and then click OK.

Office 2007/2010

  1. Click the Office Button (2007) or the File button (2010).
  2. Click Options.
  3. Click Proofing.
  4. Click AutoCorrect Options.
  5. In the Replace text as you type section, in the Replace field, enter the shortcut text (e.g., su).
  6. In the With field, enter the text you wish it to be replaced by (e.g., Stanford University).
  7. Click Add, and then click OK.

MS Office Interactive Command Reference Guides – 2003 to the new interface!

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

Finally making the leap from Office 2003 to 2007 or 2010? Wondering where your favorite 2003 commands are located in the new interface? Or just want to explore the new interface with a little guidance?

Microsoft has put together a handful of interactive web applications that will help ease the transition. Check them out!

Techie Tip of the Week: Inserting Images in Microsoft Office – Layout Status

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Original blog posting: http://bit.ly/q0Fx3v

Have you ever noticed that when you insert a photo or other image in a Microsoft Office application (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) that it sometimes “floats” around the document, but sometimes it stays inline with the rest of the document?

That’s because in MS Office, there are 5 layout statuses you can use when inserting an image, some that keep the image inline with the rest of the document, and others that allow the image to float.

Here’s how to change the Layout status of an image:

  1. Insert the image.
  2. Right-click the image and select Format Picture.
  3. Click Layout, and then click the desired Wrapping Style:

    1. In line with text – puts the image in the same line as the text (as if it were another character in the document)
    2. Square – floats the image, and places the surrounding text in a square shape around the image
    3. Tight – floats the image and puts the surrounding text as close as possible to the image
    4. Behind text – floats the image behind the text (as in a watermark)
    5. In front of text – floats the image on top of the text (without moving the text around it)
  4. Then, click OK.

Here are examples of the 5 wrapping styles:

  1. In line with text:
  2. Square:
  3. Tight:
  4. Behind text:
  5. In front of text: