Posts Tagged ‘MS Office’

Techie Tip of the Week: Adding Dummy Text in Word

Friday, November 16th, 2012

Ever find yourself wanting to test out a new layout for a brochure, poster, or article but don’t want to use actual content? The typesetting industry has for centuries used latin text to do exactly this (generally starting with “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit”).

Microsoft Word makes it easy to add this dummy text, and the newer versions of Word give you greater choice in the type of fake content you can add.

Here’s how to add dummy text using MS Word:

All Macintosh versions of MS Word and all versions of Word from 2003 and earlier:

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences with the sentence “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”, use this command:

=rand(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 1 paragraph with 5 sentences of “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”, use the command =rand(1,5):

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

 


 

Word 2007 and 2010 – “Quick brown fox”

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences with the sentence “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”, use this command:

=rand.old(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 1 paragraph with 5 sentences of “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”, use the command =rand.old(1,5):

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

 


 

Word 2007 and 2010 – Random text from the help sections

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences from the help section, use this command:

=rand(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 1 paragraph with 5 sentences from the help section, use the command =rand(1,5):

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

 


 

Word 2007 and 2010 – Lorem Ipsum

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences using the classic Lorem Ipsum text, use this command:

=lorem(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 3 paragraphs with 2 sentences of Lorem Ipsum, use the command =lorem(3,2):

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa.

Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna. Nunc viverra imperdiet enim.

Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

 

Techie Tip of the Week: Apply a New Slide Master to a PowerPoint Presentation

Friday, July 27th, 2012

Tired of the same-old PowerPoint templates that Microsoft offers? You can create your own, and then apply that new template to future presentations. Today’s tip will show you how to apply a new theme/design to your presentation.

  1. First, create (or find) a PowerPoint slide deck that looks the way you want all future slide decks to look.
  2. Next, create (or open, if it already exists) the PowerPoint slide deck you wish to change.
  3. If you are using PowerPoint 2003, on the Format menu, click Slide Design.
    If you are using PowerPoint 2007/2010, on the Ribbon, click Design.
  4. If you are using PowerPoint 2003, click the Browse button at the bottom of the task pane.
    If you are using PowerPoint 2007/2010, click the More button found in the lower-right corner of the default designs, and then click Browse for Themes.
  5. Locate the PowerPoint file you wish to use as the template.
  6. Click Apply.

Your new theme/design template is now applied to your presentation.

Use AutoCorrect in MS Office to Save Typing Time!

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Here’s a great time-saving technique in Microsoft Office — use AutoCorrect to automatically enter text that you often use. Most people realize that AutoCorrect automatically corrects misspelled words — for example, the misspelled word abbout is automatically corrected to about.

But did you know that you can create your own set of keyboard shortcuts to automatically write phrases or words you often use? For example, if you often type Stanford University in a document, you can set the letters su to automatically be replaced with the phrase Stanford University.

Here’s how to add phrases and words in the AutoCorrect options:

Office 2003/2004/2008/2011

  1. On the Tools menu, click AutoCorrect.
  2. In the Replace text as you type section, in the Replace field, enter the shortcut text (e.g., su).
  3. In the With field, enter the text you wish it to be replaced by (e.g., Stanford University).
  4. Click Add, and then click OK.

Office 2007/2010

  1. Click the Office Button (2007) or the File button (2010).
  2. Click Options.
  3. Click Proofing.
  4. Click AutoCorrect Options.
  5. In the Replace text as you type section, in the Replace field, enter the shortcut text (e.g., su).
  6. In the With field, enter the text you wish it to be replaced by (e.g., Stanford University).
  7. Click Add, and then click OK.

Techie Tip of the Week: Inserting Images in Microsoft Office – Layout Status

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Original blog posting: http://bit.ly/q0Fx3v

Have you ever noticed that when you insert a photo or other image in a Microsoft Office application (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) that it sometimes “floats” around the document, but sometimes it stays inline with the rest of the document?

That’s because in MS Office, there are 5 layout statuses you can use when inserting an image, some that keep the image inline with the rest of the document, and others that allow the image to float.

Here’s how to change the Layout status of an image:

  1. Insert the image.
  2. Right-click the image and select Format Picture.
  3. Click Layout, and then click the desired Wrapping Style:

    1. In line with text – puts the image in the same line as the text (as if it were another character in the document)
    2. Square – floats the image, and places the surrounding text in a square shape around the image
    3. Tight – floats the image and puts the surrounding text as close as possible to the image
    4. Behind text – floats the image behind the text (as in a watermark)
    5. In front of text – floats the image on top of the text (without moving the text around it)
  4. Then, click OK.

Here are examples of the 5 wrapping styles:

  1. In line with text:
  2. Square:
  3. Tight:
  4. Behind text:
  5. In front of text:

Techie Tip of the Week — Minimizing the Ribbon

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Ever work in an office document and need more screen real estate to see all of your large document? Want to hide the Ribbon in one of the Office 2007/2010/2011 programs (Word/Excel/PowerPoint/Access)? Have you ever accidentally hidden it and didn’t know how you did it?

To minimize the Ribbon, you can do one of the following:

1) In Office 2007, click the Customize Access Toolbar button and then click Minimize the Ribbon.

Click the Quick Access Toolbar, and then click Minimize Ribbon

2) In Office 2010, click the Minimize the Ribbon button (the upwards-pointing button located in the upper-right corner). To restore, click the Expand the Ribbon button (the same location, but now the button is pointing downwards).

Hide Ribbon:
Minimize Ribbon button - 2010

Expand Ribbon:

3) Right-click the Ribbon, and click Minimize the Ribbon.

Right-click and select Minimize Ribbon

4) Use the keyboard shortcut CTRL+F1.